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All Replies on Possible to stain weathered Oak dark without it looking rustic?

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View Mark's profile

Possible to stain weathered Oak dark without it looking rustic?

by Mark
posted 11-05-2018 11:22 PM


12 replies so far

View JCamp's profile

JCamp

1008 posts in 1087 days


#1 posted 11-05-2018 11:26 PM

Personally the bug holes worry me. I have no advice on how to do the stain since I personnally like the rustic look but I’d be hesitant to use THEIR lumber that might be infested with bugs.
“They want the grain hidden more and more” it sounds to me lik they don’t really want wood then. Wood has grain…...go figure

-- Whatsoever thy hand findeth to do, do it with all thy might

View Mark's profile

Mark

57 posts in 813 days


#2 posted 11-05-2018 11:30 PM

I’ve fumigated the lumber and it has been drying in a solar kiln for about 6 weeks now. I agree with everything else, but simply need to brainstorm options. This commission is the largest I’ve had so far and could lead to big things, so I need to exhaust every option before I start sending them emails asking them to adjust their expectations.

View lumbering_on's profile

lumbering_on

578 posts in 1027 days


#3 posted 11-06-2018 12:31 AM

Medium brown doesn’t sound like a good way to hide the grain, short of painting. Maybe, they would prefer something like espresso? Or maybe, you could break a few laws of physics so you could make the grain invisible?

View cracknpop's profile

cracknpop

356 posts in 2886 days


#4 posted 11-06-2018 12:52 AM

If “They want the grain hidden more and more”, probably should choose a different wood than oak, can’t get much more grain than that.
I’ve not used a grain filler before (my wife likes the grain) but probably going to be necessary to conceal the grain. Stain and seal. Then perhaps using a spray toner will ‘hide the grain’.

-- Rick - I know I am not perfect, but I will keep pressing on toward the goal of becoming all I am called to be.

View Mark's profile

Mark

57 posts in 813 days


#5 posted 11-06-2018 12:59 AM

What about filling the grain and bug holes with a light grain filler, then mixing stain with the finish and applying many many coats, gradually building up the color?

View JCamp's profile

JCamp

1008 posts in 1087 days


#6 posted 11-06-2018 01:06 AM

Most guitars have their grain filled. You might investigate that and see if you can get any ideas

-- Whatsoever thy hand findeth to do, do it with all thy might

View bilyo's profile

bilyo

872 posts in 1639 days


#7 posted 11-06-2018 01:32 AM

Can you clarify what you mean by “hide the grain”. I’m assuming they just want it filled so the finished surface is smooth. Color is another matter and can be anything they want.
Since this is a very important contract that may lead to future work, if you think the wood they have provided can’t be made to give satisfactory results, you need to either explain that to them and have them provide better lumber or get better lumber on your own dime and not tell them. The latter might be worth it to you in the long run.
I have found that oak is difficult to get dark with a stain, especially if it is sanded real smooth. Probably a dye would work better. I don’t have much experience with clear fillers, but it sounds like this is the route to go. After the dye color is right, apply as many coats of filler (sanding in between) as necessary to get the grain filled. Even after that, it may be necessary to sand back each coat of finish until you get it glass smooth.
Hope this helps. Good luck.

View Jared_S's profile

Jared_S

228 posts in 496 days


#8 posted 11-06-2018 02:02 AM

I’d fill all the holes and cracks with tinted epoxy. Color it with dye, then finish it off with a toner under the topcoat.

If they want the typical plastic veneer conference table look you will need to fill the grain as well.

View OSU55's profile

OSU55

2439 posts in 2526 days


#9 posted 11-06-2018 12:38 PM

You should be able to tint the grain filler to very close to the same color as the stain. Not sure what to think of your comment about holes and negative grain going pitch black. Stain or dye, then use toner coats to increase color intensity and even out color.

View Jared_S's profile

Jared_S

228 posts in 496 days


#10 posted 11-06-2018 02:21 PM

Are you spraying the dye? If not you should be.

View Mark's profile

Mark

57 posts in 813 days


#11 posted 11-06-2018 02:37 PM



Not sure what to think of your comment about holes and negative grain going pitch black.
- OSU55

I was referring to how the grain will become significantly darker when a dark stain is applied, but I know that can be mitigated by using dyes and grain filler.

I appreciate all the responses so far. My last question is this: seeing as I’m going to have some holes that require filling with epoxy, and then I’ll be needing to fill the grain also, can anyone recommend a brand (for the filler) and the order in which I should go about this? My assumption is that I should tint the epoxy, fill the holes, sand, then tint the filler similarly and apply. Then finish. How does that sound?

View OSU55's profile

OSU55

2439 posts in 2526 days


#12 posted 11-06-2018 02:42 PM

Timbermate can fill holes and be thinned for grain filling. Available in tints and can be tinted with wb dyes or stains.

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