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View SharkeysEnd's profile

The tapered-legs-on-a-jointer method actually works (lol)

by SharkeysEnd
posted 11-05-2018 12:38 PM


21 replies so far

View jutsFL's profile

jutsFL

167 posts in 230 days


#1 posted 11-06-2018 02:40 AM

Nice. Ive watched a few videos on this but hadnt given it a shot yet. Good to hear of its relative ease, but I’ll surely foul it up the first try or two :D

-- I've quickly learned that being a woodworker isn't about making flawless work, rather it's fixing all the mistakes you made so that it appears flawless to others! Jay - FL

View jmos's profile

jmos

913 posts in 2758 days


#2 posted 11-06-2018 12:34 PM

Yes, it does work well. I used it on my last project. I thought it might be dicey, but everything was well controlled.

-- John

View LazarusDB's profile

LazarusDB

36 posts in 554 days


#3 posted 11-06-2018 02:54 PM

I’ve used the method as well after watching a Popular Woodworking video on the technique. Don’t know that I’ll ever use another method it was so easy and produced such good results.

-- Aaron - Aspiring Craftsman

View SharkeysEnd's profile

SharkeysEnd

61 posts in 306 days


#4 posted 11-06-2018 03:08 PM


... I ll surely foul it up the first try or two :D

That’s what scrap is for! Try it – you’ll like it! ;-)

Don’t know that I’ll ever use another method it was so easy and produced such good results.

Same here

-- "Many folk like to know beforehand what is to be set on the table; but those who have laboured to prepare the feast like to keep their secret; for wonder makes the words of praise louder." -Gandalf

View WoodenDreams's profile

WoodenDreams

603 posts in 300 days


#5 posted 11-06-2018 05:07 PM

Without watching the video, You mark a pencil line the angle, then joint to the line. simple. I’ve also tapered legs with a edge sander, mark the pencil line and sand.

View Phil32's profile

Phil32

540 posts in 292 days


#6 posted 11-06-2018 05:13 PM

This is a straightforward task on a jointer – one I learned in Junior High Wood Shop class 75 years ago. The tapered legs were in maple and attached to the table rails with mortise & tenon joints.

-- Phil Allin - There are mountain climbers and people who talk about climbing mountains. The climbers have "selfies" at the summit!

View CWWoodworking's profile

CWWoodworking

484 posts in 568 days


#7 posted 11-06-2018 05:15 PM

Why would you do this? It seems it would be incredibly slow compared to table saw/jig.

View SharkeysEnd's profile

SharkeysEnd

61 posts in 306 days


#8 posted 11-06-2018 05:25 PM



Why would you do this? It seems it would be incredibly slow compared to table saw/jig.
- CWWoodworking

I don’t consider it a slow process at all. I was done in about 10 minutes. Now that I’ve done it and trust the results I could probably do it in 5. A few measurements and away you go…

-- "Many folk like to know beforehand what is to be set on the table; but those who have laboured to prepare the feast like to keep their secret; for wonder makes the words of praise louder." -Gandalf

View WoodenDreams's profile

WoodenDreams

603 posts in 300 days


#9 posted 11-06-2018 06:03 PM

We all seem to use a method that seems to be easy or quicker for us.

View LazarusDB's profile

LazarusDB

36 posts in 554 days


#10 posted 11-06-2018 06:23 PM


I don t consider it a slow process at all. I was done in about 10 minutes. Now that I ve done it and trust the results I could probably do it in 5. A few measurements and away you go…

- SharkeysEnd

Completely agree.

-- Aaron - Aspiring Craftsman

View jmos's profile

jmos

913 posts in 2758 days


#11 posted 11-06-2018 06:48 PM

Folks that haven’t seen the technique should watch the video, you’re not just jointing to a line. That would be slow and not terribly accurate.

The quick version: set your jointer to take 1/2 the total amount of taper you want per face. Run the bottom of the leg through the jointer to cut that depth half the total distance of the taper. Flip the leg so the top is facing the blades, using a push block, press the bottom of the leg against the table, so the top is sticking up, and run the leg all the way through the jointer. This takes off the full taper amount.

Total of 2 passes per face, unless you’r jointer can’t take the depth you need.

It really is quick and accurate. It seems questionable having the leg pointing up in the air, but as soon as you start cutting, the outfeed table gives you plenty of support. I think it’s faster, more accurate, and easier to set up than using a table saw.

-- John

View Phil32's profile

Phil32

540 posts in 292 days


#12 posted 11-06-2018 06:59 PM

I would suggest that the taper begin below the portion of the leg where the rails will be joined. This requires starting the jointer pass below that point. So you drop the leg onto the outfeed table and continue to jointer pass.

-- Phil Allin - There are mountain climbers and people who talk about climbing mountains. The climbers have "selfies" at the summit!

View CWWoodworking's profile

CWWoodworking

484 posts in 568 days


#13 posted 11-06-2018 08:13 PM

I just made 24 tapered legs this morning so this is fresh on my mind. 2 different types. Im sorry I just don’t get it. You have to mark every leg?why not just mark one piece(jig)? Set up on table saw is about 30 seconds. You make one pass vs two with jointer.

I guess if you didn’t have scrap to make a jig it’s ok. Other than that it’s just an inefficient way to make a taper.

But if you guys like it, who really cares.

View bandit571's profile

bandit571

22952 posts in 3072 days


#14 posted 11-06-2018 08:26 PM

Usually…since I do not have a powered Jointer….rough sawn at the bandsaw , leaving the lines…hand planes to smooth the saw marks…last pass, and no sanding required. Have used the tablesaw for tapers…and having to spend TIME removing the saw marks.

A #5 jack plane can do 95% of the taper….then a pass or two with either a longer jointer (#7 size) or just a #4 sized plane. Rotate, repeat…..

A tad messy….

A bundle of 4 tapered legs….doesn’t take all that long to do….
YMMV

-- A Planer? I'M the planer, this is what I use

View Tony_S's profile

Tony_S

970 posts in 3472 days


#15 posted 11-06-2018 08:58 PM

I would definitely do it this way….................If my table saw was broken!! lol!
It’s always good to know more than one technique though. Never stop learning.

Pisses me off when I see anyone using push sticks like the ones in the vid jmos posted. They’re dangerous as hell, especially on a table saw. A push ‘shoe’ is by FAR the safer tool to use.

Popular wood working should know better, they’re the teachers.

-- It is the mark of an educated mind to be able to entertain a thought without accepting it. Aristotle

View SharkeysEnd's profile

SharkeysEnd

61 posts in 306 days


#16 posted 11-07-2018 03:07 PM


Why would you do this? It seems it would be incredibly slow compared to table saw/jig.
I just made 24 tapered legs this morning so this is fresh on my mind. 2 different types. Im sorry I just don’t get it.

You’re looking at it from your perspective. I’m a complete novice, not a lumber jock. I won’t even call myself a woodworker yet. This is the first piece of furniture I’ve ever attempted – it’s been cutting boards and shop benches until now. It’s the first time I’ve tried to make a tapered leg. I had exactly four to make, and I don’t know when I will be doing it again. Maybe there will come a day where I’ll have 24 legs to taper, and at that time it will make complete sense to make a jig. But for now, I expect it would have taken me several hours to watch a few videos and make a jig that I might or might not be satisfied with. I’m just really slow at stuff like that. It took three attempts to make a table saw sled I was happy with.

Is that so mysterious and incomprehensible?

Regardless, I didn’t start this thread to argue the merits of the jointer method against other methods. I was pleasantly surprised at how well it worked, and chose to share my experience. I guess that was silly.

-- "Many folk like to know beforehand what is to be set on the table; but those who have laboured to prepare the feast like to keep their secret; for wonder makes the words of praise louder." -Gandalf

View bandit571's profile

bandit571

22952 posts in 3072 days


#17 posted 11-07-2018 03:20 PM

I used to do these on the jointer…..but I no longer have one in my shop. Tablesaw jig? Tried Norm Abram’s version for a set…..took too long to remove the black saw marks from the Oak legs.

IF one has a jointer…this is the way to taper legs….and the last pass would mean no sanding to do. And, no burn marks to clean up.

-- A Planer? I'M the planer, this is what I use

View BroncoBrian's profile

BroncoBrian

875 posts in 2347 days


#18 posted 11-07-2018 03:29 PM

You don’t get snipe issues like that?

A single table saw jig and you will have perfect legs every time. I feel like this is the difference between a chainsaw cutting a tree down or asking a beaver to chew it up.

-- A severed foot is the ultimate stocking stuffer.

View bandit571's profile

bandit571

22952 posts in 3072 days


#19 posted 11-07-2018 03:43 PM

Hmmm…some assume the OP even has the tablesaw to use…..some are too concerned about…”TIME”....

One could spend more time building the jigs, and setting up the saw….than it would take to just use the Jointer…

Snipe? It is JOINTER…..and a snipe is the starting point of tapering a leg.

More about what is the easiest way for what one has in their shop, IF this works great for the OP….fine. Everyone has their own ways of getting things done….and..I doubt IF the OP is even on a “Timeclock” while in the shop.

Time in a shop….any time spent in the shop is to be enjoyed. How it is enjoyed is totally up to the shop’s owner…
At no point in the OP’s post, did I read about being a “Production Shop”......more of a learning woodworking shop….not every poster here does woodworking for a living…..some just “putter around”, learning as they go. Not a bloody thing wrong with that.

So…any tips for using the Jointer for this sort of task? OP’s looks like he has it under control…..

-- A Planer? I'M the planer, this is what I use

View 000's profile

000

2859 posts in 1288 days


#20 posted 11-07-2018 04:30 PM

”Hmmm…some assume the OP even has the tablesaw to use”
That’s an easy assumption seeing that his first picture has his legs sitting on a table saw. :)

MYSELF, I use a, simple to make, jig.

Many different ways to do it. Band Saw is another.
Shoot, I could make them with my drum sander if I had to.
What I like about woodworking is that there aren’t rules about how you must do something.
Just do what works for you, and make sure you’re safe doing it.

View CWWoodworking's profile

CWWoodworking

484 posts in 568 days


#21 posted 11-07-2018 04:47 PM

Hey guys you can make them however. Like is said, who really cares. I wasn’t referring to production. I wouldn’t use that method for 4 legs, but to each their own.

I think some of you are over thinking the jig. If you know the dimesions of the leg, just transfer them onto some scrap. Attached a couple fences with screws and your done. Toggle clamp is recommended but not needed.

jbay has a decent looking jig too.

Happy sawing everyone.

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