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View mzimmers's profile

need advice for home repiar

by mzimmers
posted 11-04-2018 04:01 PM


24 replies so far

View lumbering_on's profile

lumbering_on

578 posts in 966 days


#1 posted 11-04-2018 04:05 PM

Use Bondo on it. It sounds strange, but I’ve used it to repair holes in wood that size or larger.

View mzimmers's profile

mzimmers

216 posts in 4391 days


#2 posted 11-04-2018 04:08 PM

Well…OK. I’m willing to give that a try. I’m also interested in what prep work is recommended before I start patching something in. Obviously I want to get as much of the rotted wood out as possible, but I’m wondering whether I should treat it with Coppergreen or something similar before applying the Bondo.

-- M. Zimmers

View JCamp's profile

JCamp

997 posts in 1026 days


#3 posted 11-04-2018 07:06 PM

Not meaning to step on any toes but I wouldn’t do bondo unless u want a fast/cheap fix that won’t last long. Your wood will still be rotted and continue to do so. Personnally I’d suggest cutting mayb 3-4 inches above the rot and removing the entire damaged section. Then replace with a new piece of board (preferably treated). You could then use bondo or putty to blend the seam between the old and new frame and paint. That should look as good as new and last for many years without being termite bait

-- Whatsoever thy hand findeth to do, do it with all thy might

View Ripper70's profile

Ripper70

1308 posts in 1384 days


#4 posted 11-04-2018 07:18 PM

I have to agree with JCamp. Replace the rotted wood with new. One and done.

-- "You know, I'm such a great driver, it's incomprehensible that they took my license away." --Vince Ricardo

View woodbutcherbynight's profile

woodbutcherbynight

5974 posts in 2885 days


#5 posted 11-04-2018 07:34 PM

Quick fix is bondo, it will work but this is a band aid on a finger of a cut off arm. What JC suggested would be best long term fix.

-- Live to tell the stories, they sound better that way.

View lumbering_on's profile

lumbering_on

578 posts in 966 days


#6 posted 11-04-2018 08:56 PM

I won’t argue that replacing the wood would be the best fix. However, I fixed two window sills and some deck boards at my parent’s cottage 15 years ago with Bondo. All of it was still good up until two years ago when they sold it. If that’s temporary, then I guess I’m ok with that.

View northwoodsman's profile

northwoodsman

245 posts in 4222 days


#7 posted 11-04-2018 08:56 PM

I had the same issue a few years back. I cut the rotted jamb off at about 16” from the bottom. I replaced that section with a piece of PVC jamb. I had to machine it to size. Then I used something similar to Bondo as described above but it was made for wood. It adheres to wood like you wouldn’t believe. Anyways, I used that to cover the seam. After it hardened I sanded it smooth. You can tell it is spliced and the PVS will last forever, even if sitting in water. I purchased an oscillating saw for this project and have found dozens of uses for it since. The oscillating saw was the perfect way to cut out just what i needed to, including nails.

-- NorthWoodsMan

View mzimmers's profile

mzimmers

216 posts in 4391 days


#8 posted 11-04-2018 09:03 PM

This is all good information, guys. So, I did a little more demolition:

I’ve never done much work with door carpentry, so I’m not sure what I’m looking at here. The jamb (if I’m using the term right) appears to be made of 4.5” wide, 1” thick basswood of some kind. But it has a rebate on on the inside. At first, I thought it would be two pieces of wood, but it looks like it’s just one (surprising).

So, do I correctly understand that to do this right, I have to remove the door, rip out a 84” long piece of wood (hoping I don’t damage the trim in the process), replace it, mortise for the hinges, then put it all back together?

Homeownship sucks sometimes…

-- M. Zimmers

View lumbering_on's profile

lumbering_on

578 posts in 966 days


#9 posted 11-04-2018 09:07 PM

There is some dark ‘shadow’ at the bottom of your photo, is that more damage?

As for ripping out the entire door jam, that shouldn’t be necessary unless there is some more damage the photo isn’t showing. You should just be able to remove the damaged wood, plus a few inches.

View mzimmers's profile

mzimmers

216 posts in 4391 days


#10 posted 11-04-2018 09:51 PM

No, it isn’t. (Sorry about the terrible image quality; the sun was backlighting the hell out of the scene.) It’s some rubbery stuff that ended right there (I didn’t remove any). The jamb also seems to be set off from the stud by about 1/4”—not sure how that is done, as I didn’t see any spacers in the lower area.

Here’s a somewhat improved pic:

-- M. Zimmers

View lumbering_on's profile

lumbering_on

578 posts in 966 days


#11 posted 11-04-2018 10:04 PM



No, it isn t. (Sorry about the terrible image quality; the sun was backlighting the hell out of the scene.) It s some rubbery stuff that ended right there (I didn t remove any). The jamb also seems to be set off from the stud by about 1/4”—not sure how that is done, as I didn t see any spacers in the lower area.

Here s a somewhat improved pic:

- mzimmers

I’m not in construction, but it could have been a prehung door that they installed with a space for insulation. What I’d do right now is close the door and spray it with a hose for a few minutes, and then see if the inside is getting moisture inside it. You really need to know if moisture is getting in when it rains or this isn’t going to be the last time you’re fixing this.

View JCamp's profile

JCamp

997 posts in 1026 days


#12 posted 11-04-2018 11:17 PM

Looks like u just need to remove that one little side piece that was connected to the bad stuff (looks to be mayb 14 inches long and a inch or two wide) and then replace it with a full board.
The door was a Prehung door so they just shimmed it to fit the opening. Nothing wrong with that at all. You’ll just cut a few shim pieces to put behind it for your new board to set out on. OR you might be able to take a treated 2×6 and trim and thin it down to fit
Something that you can do if you are worried about the stud behind the door getting wet over time is u can paint it with some oil base paint or something like that to seal it.

-- Whatsoever thy hand findeth to do, do it with all thy might

View mzimmers's profile

mzimmers

216 posts in 4391 days


#13 posted 11-05-2018 01:33 AM

There isn’t a side piece, though—it’s all one piece (at least it sure seems like it is). But I can probably replace it with two pieces. The hard part will be making square cuts in the wood I’m removing.

-- M. Zimmers

View mzimmers's profile

mzimmers

216 posts in 4391 days


#14 posted 11-06-2018 05:08 PM

One thing I forgot to ask: what kind of tool does one use to remove this stuff, so that there are nice clean right angles for the new wood to butt up against?

-- M. Zimmers

View JCamp's profile

JCamp

997 posts in 1026 days


#15 posted 11-06-2018 05:23 PM

Oscillating tool is the best

-- Whatsoever thy hand findeth to do, do it with all thy might

View JCamp's profile

JCamp

997 posts in 1026 days


#16 posted 11-06-2018 05:26 PM

Don’t worry to much if there is small gaps and it’s not a perfect fit. The main thing is that it’s out from the wall the same as the other piece. Any small errors at that point u can take some culk or putty and put on it to blend it then just paint and it’ll look as good as new…... or definitely better than it did. Lol

-- Whatsoever thy hand findeth to do, do it with all thy might

View Brawler's profile

Brawler

47 posts in 306 days


#17 posted 11-15-2018 02:08 PM

I agree with JCamp, cut it out using an oscillating tool, it works really well in this application. I just did this same job on both sides of the door to my shop.

-- Daniel

View MrRon's profile

MrRon

5659 posts in 3719 days


#18 posted 11-15-2018 05:03 PM

Do it right. Replace the wood or the entire frame. In the long run, it will be cheaper. It won’t have to be done again a year or two later.

View ArtMann's profile

ArtMann

1422 posts in 1292 days


#19 posted 11-15-2018 05:43 PM

I agree with MrRon. Just replace the whole door. If the opening is a standard size, the job will be a lot easier than trying to make a patch look good and you won’t be fixing it again in a couple of years.

View mzimmers's profile

mzimmers

216 posts in 4391 days


#20 posted 11-15-2018 05:43 PM

Thanks for the input, guys. I borrowed an oscillating tool and cut out two rectangles, which I replace with some cumaru that I had left over from a deck project (turned out to be the right thickness). I then got some poplar from Home Despot, ripped it to the needed length, routed a rabbet on one corner to accept the weatherstripping, and fastened that to the cumaru underneath. Sanded it, put on a good coat of Zinssler (sp?) and it’s now waiting for the color coat.

I’m fairly sure it’ll last, because I primed twice: once after putting in the cumaru, then again after putting on the poplar. Anyway, I don’t really like this door, so I may tear it out someday and replace it; I’m quite sure it’ll last until that happens.

This forum never fails me…I really appreciate all the suggestions.

-- M. Zimmers

View mzimmers's profile

mzimmers

216 posts in 4391 days


#21 posted 11-16-2018 03:41 PM

I can’t afford to replace the entire door right now…the ones I priced at Home Despot were like $3K…this will have to do until later. But, as a temporary fix, I think this will turn out fairly well. Going to paint this weekend.

-- M. Zimmers

View waho6o9's profile

waho6o9

8742 posts in 3053 days


#22 posted 11-16-2018 03:46 PM

Good job on the double primer! Your repair should last a long time.

View recon49's profile

recon49

16 posts in 481 days


#23 posted 11-21-2018 01:55 AM



Hi guys -

I realize this isn t exactly what most of us think of when we think of woodworking, but I ve always gotten good advice here, so I figured I d ask.

I moved into a home about a year ago, and have been doing all the obligatory fix-ups. Next on the list is fixing some minor rot at the bottom of an exterior door jamb.

Does this look fixable with some of that wood epoxy, or am I faced with replacing the board?

Thanks…

- mzimmers

Geez, that reminds me of the parts I need to repair at the ceiling and wall at the upper rooms. Got to finish installing the new rack, promaxx tonneau and brake kit on the truck. How’s your process installing the insulation?

View JCamp's profile

JCamp

997 posts in 1026 days


#24 posted 11-21-2018 02:24 AM

Man what kind of doors are you pricing for $3k. You can pretty much have a custom one made for that price

-- Whatsoever thy hand findeth to do, do it with all thy might

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