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View SubjectArc's profile

Can I get some opinions on Dust Collection system design? All opinions welcome

by SubjectArc
posted 11-03-2018 05:29 PM


14 replies so far

View EarlS's profile

EarlS

3299 posts in 2908 days


#1 posted 11-03-2018 06:25 PM

First of all, try to center your DC so you don’t have overly long runs, where the multi-function table is. I also suggest that you flip your table saw and assembly table so the saw is closer to the DC. Cluster all of the machines that need DC as close to the unit as you can.

Since you are a one-man shop you don’t need 5” or 6” ducts (certainly not 8”) since you can only run one tool at a time. 4” or 5” should be fine. You will need blast gates if you are going with PVC runs. Running over head doesn’t really add much pressure loss and it gets your runs out from underfoot. Your DC should be able to handle it.

You could use overhead PVC (I don’t recommend sheet metal since PVC sewer pipe is inexpensive and much easier to assemble/install) and a drop hose to the table saw, but I would use a 4” flex hose for the rest of the machines and simply move it to whatever piece of equipment you are going to use.

Honestly, though, the best approach might be to buy some flex hose, some PVC pipe, and a couple of good blast gates and try out different configurations until you come up with a layout that really works. I’ve reconfigured my equipment layout and DC several times as I worked out the best arrangement.

-- Earl "I'm a pessamist - generally that increases the chance that things will turn out better than expected"

View EarlS's profile

EarlS

3299 posts in 2908 days


#2 posted 11-03-2018 06:26 PM

Duplicate post

-- Earl "I'm a pessamist - generally that increases the chance that things will turn out better than expected"

View Holbs's profile

Holbs

2254 posts in 2589 days


#3 posted 11-03-2018 07:41 PM

As Earl above says…8” is excessive and probably not a great idea. Go 6” for all ducting. Pricing and unsure if even 1900 CFM would support 8” or even 7” diameter. I would assume 8”+ is in the realm of 5HP machines.
I too, went hip/chest level for ducting. Don’t do it. Sure, might work now but you’ll regret it in the future when you need that wall space. I have since moved to ceiling.
I originally used HVAC 6” ducting for the sole reason of price tag since I could get all 26 gauge items at cost, not retail due to friend at HVAC distribution center. If I had to go full retail for either HVAC or PVC, I would go PVC. Much easier to work with and edit for future needs.

-- The Carpenter Bee is derived from the Ancient Greek word wood-cutter "xylokopos/ξυλοκὀπος"

View Fred Hargis's profile

Fred Hargis

5834 posts in 3053 days


#4 posted 11-03-2018 07:53 PM

I’ll echo the points made above. Go overhead, You can probably make that central drop only 1 pipe with 3 feeds off the bottom…each with it’s own blast gate. I have mine set up that way. I also agree the 6” should be the best balance of cost/performance. 6” thinwall PVC can be hard to find, and the real money might be to get the fittings. So consider both and go with the one that’s doable.

-- Our village hasn't lost it's idiot, he was elected to congress.

View Redoak49's profile

Redoak49

4272 posts in 2548 days


#5 posted 11-03-2018 09:55 PM

The Grizzly spec of 1941 cfm is a bit optimistic for a 3 HP DC.

View WoodenDreams's profile

WoodenDreams

830 posts in 471 days


#6 posted 11-04-2018 01:15 AM

This is good for saw dust and shavings. But have you considered a Air Filtration Unit for all the wading dust. Since your girl friend doesn’t like a dusty car, a Air Filtration Unit will help with that, and also benefit your lungs from the dust.

View SubjectArc's profile

SubjectArc

8 posts in 401 days


#7 posted 11-04-2018 02:05 AM



First of all, try to center your DC so you don t have overly long runs, where the multi-function table is. I also suggest that you flip your table saw and assembly table so the saw is closer to the DC. Cluster all of the machines that need DC as close to the unit as you can.

Since you are a one-man shop you don t need 5” or 6” ducts (certainly not 8”) since you can only run one tool at a time. 4” or 5” should be fine. You will need blast gates if you are going with PVC runs. Running over head doesn t really add much pressure loss and it gets your runs out from underfoot. Your DC should be able to handle it.

You could use overhead PVC (I don t recommend sheet metal since PVC sewer pipe is inexpensive and much easier to assemble/install) and a drop hose to the table saw, but I would use a 4” flex hose for the rest of the machines and simply move it to whatever piece of equipment you are going to use.

Honestly, though, the best approach might be to buy some flex hose, some PVC pipe, and a couple of good blast gates and try out different configurations until you come up with a layout that really works. I ve reconfigured my equipment layout and DC several times as I worked out the best arrangement.

- EarlS

Earl, this is great advice. I think I will be moving my DC to the northeast corner (swapping spots with the tool chest) as well as flipping the TS and AT 180* as you specified. I have plenty of space south of their position to slide them for when ripping large sections of sheet goods, if needed.

Regarding the vertical drops of plumbing, would you recommend I stick with PVC for as long as possible? I’m envisioning a “Tower of suck” that goes all the way to floor, with one or multiple wyes branching off in the appropriate tool direction. This way I can be very minimal with flex hose usage.

Thanks again!!

View SubjectArc's profile

SubjectArc

8 posts in 401 days


#8 posted 11-04-2018 02:06 AM


As Earl above says…8” is excessive and probably not a great idea. Go 6” for all ducting. Pricing and unsure if even 1900 CFM would support 8” or even 7” diameter. I would assume 8”+ is in the realm of 5HP machines.
I too, went hip/chest level for ducting. Don t do it. Sure, might work now but you ll regret it in the future when you need that wall space. I have since moved to ceiling.
I originally used HVAC 6” ducting for the sole reason of price tag since I could get all 26 gauge items at cost, not retail due to friend at HVAC distribution center. If I had to go full retail for either HVAC or PVC, I would go PVC. Much easier to work with and edit for future needs.

- Holbs

Thanks Holbs, the 6” suggestions from everyone is really helpful in that there’s so much more PVC options at a reasonable price. Jay Bates has a great video of using a pretty similar infrastructure, so I’ll definitely be cheating off his (and your all’s advice) Thank you!!

View SubjectArc's profile

SubjectArc

8 posts in 401 days


#9 posted 11-04-2018 02:10 AM



I ll echo the points made above. Go overhead, You can probably make that central drop only 1 pipe with 3 feeds off the bottom…each with it s own blast gate. I have mine set up that way. I also agree the 6” should be the best balance of cost/performance. 6” thinwall PVC can be hard to find, and the real money might be to get the fittings. So consider both and go with the one that s doable.

- Fred Hargis

Thanks Fred, I think this is exactly what I am going to attempt. Did you go all the way to the floor with your PVC drop, for support? I can probably find a way to block off the last bit of PVC pipe that wouldn’t be contributing to dust transport. Lowe’s seems to have a decent-ish selection of sewer PVC piping that is MUCH more budget friendly than the 8” monsters I see on supplier websites.

View SubjectArc's profile

SubjectArc

8 posts in 401 days


#10 posted 11-04-2018 02:14 AM



The Grizzly spec of 1941 cfm is a bit optimistic for a 3 HP DC.

- Redoak49

I tend to agree, that’s the exact reason I wanted to reach out to you experienced ones! I want to make sure that I’m being as efficient as possible with ducting, in case the real world performance doesn’t come close to the spec sheet.

I’m hopeful that these units (made in Taiwan) might be of a higher quality than some of their chinese factory offerings. I wonder if Harbor Freight has one of those handheld suction sensors I’ve seen on youtube to test DC systems. hmmmm…

View SubjectArc's profile

SubjectArc

8 posts in 401 days


#11 posted 11-04-2018 02:18 AM



This is good for saw dust and shavings. But have you considered a Air Filtration Unit for all the wading dust. Since your girl friend doesn t like a dusty car, a Air Filtration Unit will help with that, and also benefit your lungs from the dust.

- WoodenDreams

WD, this is an great idea. An AFU is definitely something that I want to deploy. I was on another woodworking forum and a guy suggested a pretty cool DIY rig involving a used furnace blower motor and some HEPA filters. It sounds like a pretty fun project. For right now I’m getting by with a 3M P100 respirator, but boy would it be nice to have something to lessen my current PPE requirements.

View Brawler's profile

Brawler

90 posts in 390 days


#12 posted 11-14-2018 06:23 PM


This is good for saw dust and shavings. But have you considered a Air Filtration Unit for all the wading dust. Since your girl friend doesn t like a dusty car, a Air Filtration Unit will help with that, and also benefit your lungs from the dust.

- WoodenDreams

WD, this is an great idea. An AFU is definitely something that I want to deploy. I was on another woodworking forum and a guy suggested a pretty cool DIY rig involving a used furnace blower motor and some HEPA filters. It sounds like a pretty fun project. For right now I m getting by with a 3M P100 respirator, but boy would it be nice to have something to lessen my current PPE requirements.

- SubjectArc


I’m about to build one of those, but I’m thinking about making it as a planer stand too. Dual purpose to save room.

-- Daniel

View Fred Hargis's profile

Fred Hargis

5834 posts in 3053 days


#13 posted 11-14-2018 07:37 PM


Thanks Fred, I think this is exactly what I am going to attempt. Did you go all the way to the floor with your PVC drop, for support?

- SubjectArc

My center drop goes down to within 6” of the floor. The bottom of the center drop is an elbow that pulls from the cabinet on the table saw. The floor support is from a pair of plywood legs that support the blast gate. The pipe is all held together with screws on the vertical runs, so it all holds up very well.

-- Our village hasn't lost it's idiot, he was elected to congress.

View TungOil's profile

TungOil

1354 posts in 1055 days


#14 posted 11-15-2018 04:11 AM

You have started at the end of the DC system design process. You need to first design the ductwork based on your machinery requirements, proper duct velocities and pressure drops. Only then can you size the Dust collector to match your needs and ductwork.

Start here: https://airhand.com/designing/

-- The optimist says "the glass is half full". The pessimist says "the glass is half empty". The engineer says "the glass is twice as big as it needs to be"

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