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View cpbuck's profile

Laminating Boards for a Table Top

by cpbuck
posted 11-02-2018 01:14 PM


11 replies so far

View Stan Shields's profile

Stan Shields

16 posts in 279 days


#1 posted 11-02-2018 01:22 PM

If your gonna put edging on all four sides seems kinda silly to laminate the top with hardwood. Make the edging any height you like, it can underhand the top by a bit or add filler strips behind the edging foe 2” or so.

-- Built guitars in my basement for many years, mistakes went into the wood stove, was rarely cold.

View Aj2's profile

Aj2

2263 posts in 2184 days


#2 posted 11-02-2018 01:55 PM

Trying to cut corners in woodworking sounds like a recipe for disaster.

-- Aj

View ocean's profile

ocean

159 posts in 1219 days


#3 posted 11-02-2018 02:02 PM

Unless your sister wants a solid maple top I would forego the bottom piece (you can’t see it unless your on the floor) for a good quality ply. This will solve / mitigate the warping problem. Edge band the sides with maple that is at least 1/4” wider than table is thick and use a sliding dove tails for both ends. The material cost saving – good sales point to your sister.

-- Bob, FL Keys

View bilyo's profile

bilyo

691 posts in 1489 days


#4 posted 11-02-2018 02:13 PM

I agree with Stancin. Thicken just the edges. It will save wood, save weight, and eliminate the potential problems with wood movement you mention (even though I think they would be minimal).
In order to hide the joint line at the thickened edge, you might consider using a miter cut. That way the joint will be masked by the corner.

View Dustin's profile

Dustin

689 posts in 1127 days


#5 posted 11-02-2018 02:31 PM

https://www.woodworkingnetwork.com/custom-woodworking/gluing-pressing-adhesives/How-To-Make-A-Thick-Countertop-Out-Of-Thin-Wood--249194161.html

I used this approach (I believe what bilyo is referencing above) to make a seemingly thicker table top for a welcome desk at my church. It worked great, and is still holding up terrifically after a year of use.

-- "Ladies, if your husband says he'll get to it, he'll get to it. No need to remind him about it every 6 months."

View Bill_Steele's profile

Bill_Steele

515 posts in 2118 days


#6 posted 11-02-2018 02:34 PM

I don’t think there is any problem gluing up 1” thick stock to other 1” thick stock to make 2” thick stock—as long as it’s the same species (similar expansion/contraction rates) and NOT glued cross grain.

View bilyo's profile

bilyo

691 posts in 1489 days


#7 posted 11-02-2018 05:10 PM


https://www.woodworkingnetwork.com/custom-woodworking/gluing-pressing-adhesives/How-To-Make-A-Thick-Countertop-Out-Of-Thin-Wood--249194161.html

I used this approach (I believe what bilyo is referencing above) to make a seemingly thicker table top for a welcome desk at my church. It worked great, and is still holding up terrifically after a year of use.

- Dustin

Actually, I was think more in terms of a square edge like this:

But, the one you linked is nice and does a good job of hiding the glue line.

View Tony_S's profile

Tony_S

970 posts in 3469 days


#8 posted 11-02-2018 11:23 PM



Trying to cut corners in woodworking sounds like a recipe for disaster.

- Aj2


I must have missed the ‘cutting corners’ part of the post…where was that?

-- It is the mark of an educated mind to be able to entertain a thought without accepting it. Aristotle

View lumbering_on's profile

lumbering_on

578 posts in 876 days


#9 posted 11-02-2018 11:52 PM

Maybe I’m reading this wrong, but this seems like a train wreck coming. I’ve seen too many instances where family and friends ask for a ‘favour’, but then refuse to accept the fact that you aren’t just there to make them happy. If she’s just thinking she can get a superior table for half the price then there’s a good chance that one of you, likely both are going to have some hard feelings afterwards. That’s something that usually drags a whole bunch of people into the situation on both sides.

I’d make sure you really want to do this. It may be easier to ask them to get something at the nearest furniture store.

View Aj2's profile

Aj2

2263 posts in 2184 days


#10 posted 11-03-2018 12:49 AM

Keep thinking about it Tony you’ll figure it out.

-- Aj

View bilyo's profile

bilyo

691 posts in 1489 days


#11 posted 11-03-2018 03:36 AM


The table will have bread board ends so I can hide the end grain. I have a few good 8/4 boards that I would use as the edge boards so as far as I know, nobody would ever know that the interior boards were laminated.

- cpbuck

Nobody would ever know that the interior boards were 4/4 either. Use your 8/4 pieces for edges and breadboards. Leave the interior 4/4. Saves weight, saves lumber, saves dollars, and still gives your sister the look she wants.

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