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View Dtronc's profile

1st Jointer help

by Dtronc
posted 11-01-2018 09:33 PM


24 replies so far

View BattleRidge's profile

BattleRidge

120 posts in 752 days


#1 posted 11-01-2018 10:55 PM

My first Grizzly tool was a G0490 jointer and I like it really well – it did much toward turning me into a fan of Grizzly equipment. I usually like to see things in person and to go through it physically before buying, which is one of the reasons I hadn’t really done much in the Grizzly aspect before (the lack of machines to view in my area), but after having a chance to use it and experience the overall quality and build, I am quite satisfied.

I also found the G0490 on Facebook Marketplace for $750 and have since purchased a Grizzly G0548Z Dust Collector for $200 there, and while I generally prefer to purchase new, these two buys have given me a favorable of buying new when the machine and the price are right.

My only Ridgid tool is their oscillating spindle / belt sander and I have been satisfied with its design, build and quality.

I don’t have any experience with Delta but they seem to be a staple in woodworking that goes back a ways.

With a quick look through each of the three machines you have listed, I would give the edge to the Grizzly, but that is just my opinion and I don’t have any actual direct experience with any of the three jointers.

View Aj2's profile

Aj2

2529 posts in 2334 days


#2 posted 11-01-2018 11:21 PM

I’d go after the Dj 15.

-- Aj

View Phil32's profile

Phil32

687 posts in 440 days


#3 posted 11-01-2018 11:32 PM

There is not much that can go wrong on a jointer, so I have usually chosen to look for used. But I’m not intimidated by the prospect of having to rework the set-up of a machine. My little 4-inch Rockwell works fine for the glue-ups I do for woodcarving:

-- Phil Allin - There are mountain climbers and people who talk about climbing mountains. The climbers have "selfies" at the summit!

View Holbs's profile

Holbs

2249 posts in 2565 days


#4 posted 11-02-2018 12:26 AM

Since first jointer… I would skip all 3 and look elsewhere for a $150-$200 Craigslist jointer. You will eventually go for a 8” after a number of years. Or maybe not. But 6” jointers are dime a dozen and I can find good ones locally for $200, not $500 used.
Or maybe you simply want a brand new jointer, like that Grizzly

-- The Carpenter Bee is derived from the Ancient Greek word wood-cutter "xylokopos/ξυλοκὀπος"

View Bob5103's profile

Bob5103

147 posts in 1370 days


#5 posted 11-02-2018 12:31 AM

I have had Grizzly tools since 1988, and have never had a major problem. I don’t know anything about the Rigid but a lot of people use them. Unless you are willing to spend some quality time with Delta, which would make it a fine machine, you should stay away from that one.

View firefighterontheside's profile

firefighterontheside

20628 posts in 2393 days


#6 posted 11-02-2018 12:43 AM

I just bought a 6” jointer with 66” bed, because my grizzly became too short for jointing long boards. I would lean toward that delta if it indeed has 5’ table. See if they will “let it go” for more like $400.

-- Bill M. "People change, walnut doesn't" by Gene.

View Sludgeguy's profile

Sludgeguy

57 posts in 659 days


#7 posted 11-02-2018 12:43 AM

If you’re going to flatten rough lumber you’ll be happier with an 8” machine. You can pick up a nice used 8” jointer for about $500. Just saw an older 8” Powermatic for $500 on Orlando Craigslist.

View Aj2's profile

Aj2

2529 posts in 2334 days


#8 posted 11-02-2018 12:50 AM



There is not much that can go wrong on a jointer, so I have usually chosen to look for used. But I m not intimidated by the prospect of having to rework the set-up of a machine. My little 4-inch Rockwell works fine for the glue-ups I do for woodcarving:

- Phil32

Just curious Phil what does your photo represent.

-- Aj

View Holbs's profile

Holbs

2249 posts in 2565 days


#9 posted 11-02-2018 03:58 AM

AJ… looks like 4” boards (done via his 4” jointer) glued together to make a panel

-- The Carpenter Bee is derived from the Ancient Greek word wood-cutter "xylokopos/ξυλοκὀπος"

View jutsFL's profile

jutsFL

191 posts in 377 days


#10 posted 11-02-2018 04:38 AM

I own the same Rigid jointer (albeit the older model). I am also a new woodworker, and I love the machine. Prefoms very well, set up is pretty intuitive, but knife changes are MUCH easier witha jig – although that’s most any jointer I’ve found with the exception of the spiral heads. Surely any would suit you well. Only reason I ended up with mine was a good deal on the FB marketplace.

-- I've quickly learned that being a woodworker isn't about making flawless work, rather it's fixing all the mistakes you made so that it appears flawless to others! Jay - FL

View Aj2's profile

Aj2

2529 posts in 2334 days


#11 posted 11-02-2018 04:50 AM



AJ… looks like 4” boards (done via his 4” jointer) glued together to make a panel

- Holbs

I think your right . Why are there strips of wood going across the grain? Is this some kind of jointer sorcery
The plot thickens

-- Aj

View WoodenDreams's profile

WoodenDreams

791 posts in 447 days


#12 posted 11-02-2018 07:26 AM

The longer table does make a difference. I’m saving my money for the Grizzly G0656, 8”x72” with the 5” fence. If you can get the Delta for $400, if it’s a 5’ table. You can always upgrade it later. Most of the time somebody selling a used item will set a higher starter price knowing they’ll most likely be negotiated down.

View Dtronc's profile

Dtronc

13 posts in 377 days


#13 posted 11-02-2018 11:00 AM



My first Grizzly tool was a G0490 jointer and I like it really well – it did much toward turning me into a fan of Grizzly equipment. I usually like to see things in person and to go through it physically before buying, which is one of the reasons I hadn t really done much in the Grizzly aspect before (the lack of machines to view in my area), but after having a chance to use it and experience the overall quality and build, I am quite satisfied.

I also found the G0490 on Facebook Marketplace for $750 and have since purchased a Grizzly G0548Z Dust Collector for $200 there, and while I generally prefer to purchase new, these two buys have given me a favorable of buying new when the machine and the price are right.

My only Ridgid tool is their oscillating spindle / belt sander and I have been satisfied with its design, build and quality.

I don t have any experience with Delta but they seem to be a staple in woodworking that goes back a ways.

With a quick look through each of the three machines you have listed, I would give the edge to the Grizzly, but that is just my opinion and I don t have any actual direct experience with any of the three jointers.

- BattleRidge

Thanks for the very informative reply! I was leaning towards the Grizzly. I like that it comes with casters to roll it around. I am with you, I need to be able to see it in person before I buy.

View Dtronc's profile

Dtronc

13 posts in 377 days


#14 posted 11-02-2018 11:07 AM



I’d go after the Dj 15.

- Aj2

Might check it out today. He said the blades are excellent and runs fine. Only thing is that its 2+ hours from me and its a 30 year old machine. I have a small hatchback, so I would have to take it apart and tray to get it in there haha

View Dtronc's profile

Dtronc

13 posts in 377 days


#15 posted 11-02-2018 11:14 AM



There is not much that can go wrong on a jointer, so I have usually chosen to look for used. But I m not intimidated by the prospect of having to rework the set-up of a machine. My little 4-inch Rockwell works fine for the glue-ups I do for woodcarving:

- Phil32

Technically I did have a jointer for a 1 1/2 weeks. It was an old Reilant 6” craigslist find. It fell and cracked while moving haha

Do you carve on the other side? What it looks like to me are battens or cradles to prevent wood movement. I am actually making something similar for oil painting! Thats the traditional way of making panels and the battens help prevent cupping.

View Dtronc's profile

Dtronc

13 posts in 377 days


#16 posted 11-02-2018 11:21 AM



Since first jointer… I would skip all 3 and look elsewhere for a $150-$200 Craigslist jointer. You will eventually go for a 8” after a number of years. Or maybe not. But 6” jointers are dime a dozen and I can find good ones locally for $200, not $500 used.
Or maybe you simply want a brand new jointer, like that Grizzly

- Holbs

I managed to find an old Reliant 6” but it was dropped while moving. Cracked on the front and back base iron. I JB welded it and it seems sturdy enough but I wont dare turn it on! Everyone in my area is selling for 90% of a new jointer. I wish I could have a larger jointer but I move around a lot. I also don’t have access to the power needed for an 8”. Definitely down the road when I settle…then I’ll be dreaming of a 12”! haha

View Dtronc's profile

Dtronc

13 posts in 377 days


#17 posted 11-02-2018 11:24 AM



I have had Grizzly tools since 1988, and have never had a major problem. I don t know anything about the Rigid but a lot of people use them. Unless you are willing to spend some quality time with Delta, which would make it a fine machine, you should stay away from that one.

- Bob5103

I do like the Grizzly! The Delta is 30 yrs old, about as old as I am haha. I know older machines are often made better but my concern is that the motor will go and then I will be on the hunt for a new motor.

View Dtronc's profile

Dtronc

13 posts in 377 days


#18 posted 11-02-2018 11:31 AM



The longer table does make a difference. I m saving my money for the Grizzly G0656, 8”x72” with the 5” fence. If you can get the Delta for $400, if it s a 5 table. You can always upgrade it later. Most of the time somebody selling a used item will set a higher starter price knowing they ll most likely be negotiated down.

- WoodenDreams

I will talk with him and see what he says. He thinks its worth 700, so he may be firm. Concerned I wont be able to jointer longer stock.

View Dtronc's profile

Dtronc

13 posts in 377 days


#19 posted 11-02-2018 11:50 AM


AJ… looks like 4” boards (done via his 4” jointer) glued together to make a panel

- Holbs

I think your right . Why are there strips of wood going across the grain? Is this some kind of jointer sorcery
The plot thickens

- Aj2

Historically, artists would paint or carve on panels like these. The battens on the back are usually dovetailed in or nailed into a groove. It helps to prevent warping of the flat face. Not to take sides or anything like that, just sparked my interest :) , art conservators studying the deterioration of wood panels have found that if you want to make a large panel (anything bigger, like a table size) its best to use smaller strips of wood for the glue up. Whats even stranger/cooler is that they say you should replace the center panel of the glue up with 3 or 4 even smaller squared strips ( if the wood is 2” thick, make the strips 2” wide x whatever length) I don’t have any experience with that technique so i cant back it up hahaha

View Dtronc's profile

Dtronc

13 posts in 377 days


#20 posted 11-02-2018 12:15 PM



I own the same Rigid jointer (albeit the older model). I am also a new woodworker, and I love the machine. Prefoms very well, set up is pretty intuitive, but knife changes are MUCH easier witha jig – although that s most any jointer I ve found with the exception of the spiral heads. Surely any would suit you well. Only reason I ended up with mine was a good deal on the FB marketplace.

- jutsFL

Just saw the same one pop up, maybe I will check it out it! Thanks!


View Holbs's profile

Holbs

2249 posts in 2565 days


#21 posted 11-03-2018 12:46 AM

Here is a picture of my now gone Rockwell 6” jointer vs my current GeeTec 8” long bed jointer. You can see why I have a much easier time jointing long boards with the long bed jointer. Though, with the Rockwell, I learned alot. Such as how to use a jointer, setting knives, etc. A great beginner jointer that I would never of paid $150+ for.

-- The Carpenter Bee is derived from the Ancient Greek word wood-cutter "xylokopos/ξυλοκὀπος"

View Dtronc's profile

Dtronc

13 posts in 377 days


#22 posted 11-05-2018 07:38 PM



Here is a picture of my now gone Rockwell 6” jointer vs my current GeeTec 8” long bed jointer. You can see why I have a much easier time jointing long boards with the long bed jointer. Though, with the Rockwell, I learned alot. Such as how to use a jointer, setting knives, etc. A great beginner jointer that I would never of paid $150+ for.

- Holbs

OOOO That thing is a beast!


View CaptainKlutz's profile

CaptainKlutz

1945 posts in 2030 days


#23 posted 11-06-2018 07:11 AM

+1 Owned a Ridgid jointer for several years. Picked mine up on closeout for $320 brand new, when BORG stopped selling the jointer in stores. Solid tool, not much that can go wrong, works as well as my old bench top 6” Rockwell, but was better for longer boards due longer tables. Only sold it as I replaced it with a used 8” GeeTec unit.

+1 Count me as another who thinks buying a 6” model can be waste of time/money, as larger mass and longer tables on 8”, make working with boards over 4’ easier, and working with larger 8/4+ lumber much safer. It takes some practice to learn how to joint long boards on short jointer bed.

+1 Unless you desire the smell of new tools, buying a used jointer is really easy. Not many parts, and they last for decades as long as no rough abuse that breaks cast iron. Blades are cheap, and easy to adjust. Even a new machine will need to have blades checked and adjusted before use.
I wouldn’t pay more than $250-$300 for used 6 inch jointer, maybe $400 for Delta Dj-10 if it is prefect shape. Should be able to find an 8” jointer for $500-600 used, as they were less than $1000-$1200 brand new. A new Delta DJ-20 (8”) sold for up to $2000, so might need to pay up to $750 for used Delta. I can tell you that at these use prices (at/below 50 percent of list), that good machines sell quick- especially an 8” version. It might seem like they are not available, but in reality the issue is they sell in a few hours, or same day as they are listed.

Frankly, Not sure part time home shop needs a jointer? Many times question if I even need one laying around? About only time I use it, is when I have a large pile of rough cut boards to process. If I only need to joint a couple boards, I use hand planes instead.

They were two keys that idled many uses of my jointer:
: I made a work bench that would easily clamp 8’ long boards on edge, and learned how to use #7 & #8 hand planes. I can joint 2 boards to create an edge joint at same time, faster than using power jointer. Requires less than 5 minutes to joint 4-6 boards to make a panel.

: Other problem I face is lack of space in my garage. So my jointer as not conveniently set up, so to run any boards over 2 ft long, requires moving it away from storage wall and hooking up dust collector. Even with mobile bases, and ‘Dust Right’ quick connects on dust collection; it takes time and space. I can clamp and joint 2-3 boards at my bench, faster than I can move and hook up the silly power jointer.

Don’t get me wrong: If I needed to joint more than 15-20 boards in a day (making panels, cutting boards, etc), I find using power jointer faster and am happy I have one. But in last 4 years since I got my 8” jointer, have only set up jointer for a few hours of work a couple times each year.
So you might want to consider if spending $80-100 on used Stanley #6/#7 from fleabay & $80 on Veritas PM-11 blade; is a more versatile investment than another large power tool you seldom use?

Best Luck with your decision. :)

-- I'm an engineer not a woodworker, but I can randomly find useful tools and furniture inside a pile of lumber!

View SharkeysEnd's profile

SharkeysEnd

61 posts in 453 days


#24 posted 11-06-2018 12:24 PM

I’m a weekend and evening woodworker, and I use my jointer almost every day. But that’s because I have a friend who is a cabinet maker, and he gave me access to his scrap hard wood pile. It’s all rough cut stuff.

I had been making myself crazy trying to find a decent jointer, and then I finally got fed up and bought a 6-1/8” craftsman for $75. Despite the fact that the infeed table is slightly cupped, I get by with it. But it offered me the opportunity to be patient and pick up an 8 inch jointer when I can find one.

Someone above replied that they saw an old Powermatic jointer for 500 bucks. I just saw a posting for an old green one and they were looking for $1000. The last DJ-20 I saw was listed at $1195. Sheesh

I know a lot of people advise the last tool first approach, and I do try to do that. But with the jointer, I did want to wait because projects were being held up. I didn’t mind dropping $75 just to get started. I have definitely gotten more than my moneys worth out of it in the last three months or so. Hunting for an 8 inch one has been proving a challenge. I check every day, several times a day, and usually they are 3 to 5 hours away. A couple of reasonably priced ones have popped up, but were sold by the time I heard back from the seller.

-- "Many folk like to know beforehand what is to be set on the table; but those who have laboured to prepare the feast like to keep their secret; for wonder makes the words of praise louder." -Gandalf

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