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View Karda's profile

HF lathe motor question

by Karda
posted 10-31-2018 04:39 AM


17 replies so far

View John Smith's profile

John Smith

1828 posts in 551 days


#1 posted 10-31-2018 12:39 PM

how much does it touch ?
if that will be its permanent home, can you route out that area ?

.

.

-- Failure is proof that you at least tried ~ now, go do it again, and again, until you get it right --

View Steve's profile

Steve

1275 posts in 971 days


#2 posted 10-31-2018 12:45 PM

Can you just put some wood blocks under the feet before attaching to the bench?

View Jeff's profile

Jeff

507 posts in 3583 days


#3 posted 10-31-2018 12:57 PM



Can you just put some wood blocks under the feet before attaching to the bench?

- Steve

He said he didn’t want to raise the lathe. I think John’s suggestion is best. Either rout out a hole or just cut it out with a jig saw for example.

View Steve's profile

Steve

1275 posts in 971 days


#4 posted 10-31-2018 01:01 PM

Can you just put some wood blocks under the feet before attaching to the bench?

- Steve

He said he didn t want to raise the lathe. I think John s suggestion is best. Either rout out a hole or just cut it out with a jig saw for example.

- Jeff

Ahh, missed that part. No coffee yet. Looks like this might be the lathe he’s talking about.

Depending on how much the motor touches, maybe he could keep the rubber feet on and drill out recesses for just the feet instead? Would depend on how thick his bench is though.

View GR8HUNTER's profile

GR8HUNTER

6081 posts in 1101 days


#5 posted 11-01-2018 02:45 AM

I would take some off the legs of the bench :<)))

-- Tony---- Reinholds,Pa.------ REMEMBER TO ALWAYS HAVE FUN

View Dakkar's profile

Dakkar

354 posts in 2316 days


#6 posted 11-01-2018 03:03 AM

You can’t reposition the motor, so raising it a bit is your only real option. If it’s the lathe Steve showed there you must have had to remove the feet to bolt it down anyway. I think I would just shim it up as little as is necessary to raise it off the table. You could use wood scraps, though hard rubber would be nice to absorb some of the vibration, I suppose. The only other solution would be to excavate a depression in your bench to accommodate the motor. If you don’t intend to use that bench area for anything else, that might do it.

View MrUnix's profile (online now)

MrUnix

7387 posts in 2587 days


#7 posted 11-01-2018 03:06 AM

As long as you aren’t putting a lot of force on it, and you can change the belt position as usual, then it should not hurt it a bit IMO.

Cheers,
Brad

-- Brad in FL - In Dog I trust... everything else is questionable

View WoodenDreams's profile

WoodenDreams

603 posts in 299 days


#8 posted 11-01-2018 03:18 AM

Are you planning on attaching it to your bench permanently, since you said you were trying to bolt it down, if so cut away part of the bench that interferes. Or remove part of the benchtop & lower that portion of the top for the lathe.

View Lazyman's profile

Lazyman

3409 posts in 1776 days


#9 posted 11-01-2018 03:49 AM

+1, Though it might be a little noisier as the bench will probably resonate any vibration from the motor or lathe itself.


As long as you aren t putting a lot of force on it, and you can change the belt position as usual, then it should not hurt it a bit IMO.

Cheers,
Brad

- MrUnix


-- Nathan, TX -- Hire the lazy man. He may not do as much work but that's because he will find a better way.

View Karda's profile

Karda

1528 posts in 942 days


#10 posted 11-01-2018 09:32 PM

gotta have it on blocks, with the motor on the bench it interfere with the belt changing, I put a board on the floor to stand on that works. I wanted it lower because it make my shoulder tense up if its to high and I’m to tense as it is

View PeteStaehling's profile

PeteStaehling

92 posts in 1508 days


#11 posted 11-02-2018 10:24 AM


I would take some off the legs of the bench :<)))

- GR8HUNTER


Or raise the area where you stand. For that little bit a nice thick rubber mat would add the height and add some foot comfort.

View Karda's profile

Karda

1528 posts in 942 days


#12 posted 11-02-2018 03:57 PM

that is something I don’t want to get into, the legs are steel and it is a very heavy bench. Not worth it for a few inches

View sepeck's profile

sepeck

402 posts in 2530 days


#13 posted 11-02-2018 04:07 PM

My wife volunteers at the Elementary School library and they have a book fair which sells tons of stuff. The counters however are to tall so I made her some Apple boxes which they all use to stand on. With this, you can leave the rubber feet on if you want.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=lGZHLL8BmZw
https://nickferry.com/product/apple-boxes-cut-list/

-- -Steven Peck, http://www.blkmtn.org

View Pat's profile

Pat

24 posts in 157 days


#14 posted 01-16-2019 05:29 AM

If the lathe is to high put a platform on the floor as high as needed get a old pallet and put a peace of plywood on top of the pallet and you have it,

-- Pat Elk Ridge Wild Woods

View mahdee's profile

mahdee

4290 posts in 2156 days


#15 posted 01-16-2019 12:52 PM

I bought one of those lathe from HF to reduce the amount of abuse to my good ones. If you read the reviews, just about all of them (including mine) state that the motor gets very hot. My shop stays at about 50 degrees in winter and after few minutes of operating the lathe, you can’t touch the motor for too long before the heat creates a counter reaction. I don’t cool my shop so I am not looking forward to operating it in a 80-90 degree temperatures. It is possible that once the brushes get a little worn out, it might operate a bit cooler.

-- earthartandfoods.com

View HokieKen's profile

HokieKen

9512 posts in 1527 days


#16 posted 01-16-2019 01:49 PM

I agree with getting something to stand on. Maybe a pallet with some plywood nailed on top. If it’s that uncomfortable, you’re probably not turning as well/safely as you could be either.

-- Kenny, SW VA, Go Hokies!!!

View MrRon's profile

MrRon

5483 posts in 3632 days


#17 posted 01-16-2019 05:59 PM

It wouldn’t seem to me that by removing the feet or leaving them on would make much difference. I would shim the feet just enough so the motor doesn’t touch the bench top. An 1/8” to a 1/4” shouldn’t be so high to make a difference.

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