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From small barn to wood shop

by NickinWI
posted 10-29-2018 01:25 PM


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69 replies

69 replies so far

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GR8HUNTER

6710 posts in 1280 days


#1 posted 10-29-2018 01:53 PM

should make a very nice shop :<))

-- Tony---- Reinholds,Pa.------ REMEMBER TO ALWAYS HAVE FUN

View Bill White's profile

Bill White

5235 posts in 4527 days


#2 posted 10-29-2018 03:08 PM

Looks as if you’re well on your way. Keep us posted.
Remember——-you need lots of elec. supply, and at least 2 240 volt accesses, plenty of light, etc. Do it now while you have a chance.

-- [email protected]

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Robert

3571 posts in 2048 days


#3 posted 10-29-2018 03:57 PM

How wide is the barn? Any concerns with load bearing? I don’t see any columns.

Electric will become an issue. 40A may be OK. FWIW I ran my entire shop on a 60A subfeed (that included a 5HP compressor beast).

An electrician familiar with shop equipment will know what you can/can’t do.

You’ll get lots of electrical advise here, but I can’t tell you how strongly I recommend hiring an electrician. Pulling a permit can open up a can of worms regarding the rest of the building so that’s up to you.

-- Everything is a prototype thats why its one of a kind!!

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fly2low

88 posts in 664 days


#4 posted 10-29-2018 07:44 PM

That will make a nice shop
Where in WI? I grew up in Tigerton – and if you don’t have to look that up you are in a very select group

-- Rich Gig Harbor, WA

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NickinWI

39 posts in 418 days


#5 posted 10-29-2018 07:52 PM



Looks as if you re well on your way. Keep us posted.
Remember——-you need lots of elec. supply, and at least 2 240 volt accesses, plenty of light, etc. Do it now while you have a chance.

- Bill White

Bill, thanks for checking in. I will definitely be going overboard on electrical since outlets are cheap and I haven’t yet figured out where tools will go exactly. I’m thinking each side wall will have a 20 amp 120v circuit with upper and lower outlets every 4 feet or so. Then also a 20 amp 220v circuit on each side wall with probably 2 outlets each side. Then a 120v ceiling circuit with 3 outlets. And I’ll add any floor outlets as needed since the lower level ceiling is open.

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NickinWI

39 posts in 418 days


#6 posted 10-29-2018 08:05 PM



How wide is the barn? Any concerns with load bearing? I don t see any columns.

Electric will become an issue. 40A may be OK. FWIW I ran my entire shop on a 60A subfeed (that included a 5HP compressor beast).

An electrician familiar with shop equipment will know what you can/can t do.

You ll get lots of electrical advise here, but I can t tell you how strongly I recommend hiring an electrician. Pulling a permit can open up a can of worms regarding the rest of the building so that s up to you.

- rwe2156

The barn is 26’ deep and 24’ wide. The upper level deck is 22.5’ wide. The rafters are site built using 2×4, so not the strongest but the barn has been up for over 40 years and is straighter than some houses I’ve seen, so I’m not too concerned. It will also be better off when I add some collar ties for the ceiling as well as the knee walls. To keep weight down I’m going with a steel ceiling instead of plywood or drywall.

40 amp definitely isn’t ideal but running a new line is cost prohibitive since it’d be over 100’ so I’m pretty confident I can make it work. I’m plan to go with as many 220v tools as possible to reduce load balancing issues and will put a light switch up stairs for my compressor so I can make sure it doesn’t kick in at an in opportune time such as when the lights are on, with the table saw, and dust collector running. I did pick up 6 48” LED lights that only draw 3 amps total so that should help.

I appreciate the recommendation on an electrician but I have quite a bit of experience with home wiring. I’m more than confident that I can install everything up to code and likely more cleanly than many electricians who just want to get in and get out as quick as possible.

Thanks again for your input.

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NickinWI

39 posts in 418 days


#7 posted 10-29-2018 08:06 PM



That will make a nice shop
Where in WI? I grew up in Tigerton – and if you don t have to look that up you are in a very select group

- fly2low

Hey Rich, I am about 20 miles northwest of Milwaukee and go ahead and mark me down as one of the few because I actually went on an ATVing trip up to Tigerton with a buddy a while back.

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mathguy1981

94 posts in 471 days


#8 posted 10-29-2018 08:31 PM

+1 to all the guys telling you to run electric NOW while you’re still in the rough stages. Also, you might consider dust collection. You don’t know where the tools will go, but based on your outlet placement you’ll have a good idea on where the big ones will….Just a thought. Lots easier to run 4” pipe now then later, and you can always move it if you don’t glue the fittings.
You might also consider where/how the DC will vent..outside or inside with filtering.
Good luck! I’m envious of your space.

-- Two thumbs and counting

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NickinWI

39 posts in 418 days


#9 posted 10-29-2018 09:03 PM



+1 to all the guys telling you to run electric NOW while you re still in the rough stages. Also, you might consider dust collection. You don t know where the tools will go, but based on your outlet placement you ll have a good idea on where the big ones will….Just a thought. Lots easier to run 4” pipe now then later, and you can always move it if you don t glue the fittings.
You might also consider where/how the DC will vent..outside or inside with filtering.
Good luck! I m envious of your space.

- mathguy1981

Thanks for the comments. You’re definitely right, I will be running all the electrical before closing up the ceiling or walls. I’ll also plan on steel for the ceiling and plywood for the walls secured with screws so modifications will be possible. As for the Dust collector I’m not too concerned with that right now since I plan to put it in the lower level and have all of the inlets come up from the floor. The lower level ceiling is currently half open and half closed, but I have no qualms taking down the plywood ceiling in the half that is currently closed up. I go back and forth on venting outside vs a filter. I think I might set it up as a convertible outlet. The reason being that most of my free time to work on projects happens to be in the winter and I don’t know that I want to exhaust all of my heated air outside when it’s well below freezing.

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johnstoneb

3131 posts in 2740 days


#10 posted 10-29-2018 09:37 PM

Double the number of 220 outlets. You said 4 do at least 8 and preferably 10. I did 4 in my shop thinking that would be plenty. Right now I could use 2 more. I have plenty of 110V and the tools run on 110V but I would prefer 220V for them.

-- Bruce, Boise, ID

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NickinWI

39 posts in 418 days


#11 posted 10-29-2018 10:26 PM



Double the number of 220 outlets. You said 4 do at least 8 and preferably 10. I did 4 in my shop thinking that would be plenty. Right now I could use 2 more. I have plenty of 110V and the tools run on 110V but I would prefer 220V for them.

- johnstoneb

Thanks Bruce, So would you say just add a 220v to each lower duplex box making probably 12ish total? I’ll also add one in the floor wherever the table saw ends up? At less than $4 a piece the cost isn’t an issue and it’s not much more wire to just pull some extra into each box and connect them to an outlet.

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NickinWI

39 posts in 418 days


#12 posted 10-29-2018 10:36 PM

Not much progress lately, just countersinking and screwing hundreds of screws through the plywood floor. To avoid double handling, I cut to size and put the corner screws in when unloading the plywood but still have all the field screws to do. The laser level makes it easy to find the floor joist since it is a continues 24’ long 2×8 for the full width of the barn. I highly suggest getting a laser level if you don’t already have one because once you have it you inevitably find uses for it.

Below are a few other pictures just to give everyone an idea of what I’m working with.

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Clarkie

489 posts in 2408 days


#13 posted 10-29-2018 10:40 PM

Hello Nick and welcome. You reminded me of the shop I had out in the country years ago. It was on the 3rd floor of a barn that was over 130yrs old. I had over 2 thousand square feet and the ceiling was 38’ high. She had massive timber framed beams, sliding door on the side and window at each end. Had it wired and made a lot of sawdust up there. You’ll find the guys and gals here very helpful, again, welcome aboard, Clarkie.

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NickinWI

39 posts in 418 days


#14 posted 10-29-2018 11:54 PM


Hello Nick and welcome. You reminded me of the shop I had out in the country years ago. It was on the 3rd floor of a barn that was over 130yrs old. I had over 2 thousand square feet and the ceiling was 38 high. She had massive timber framed beams, sliding door on the side and window at each end. Had it wired and made a lot of sawdust up there. You ll find the guys and gals here very helpful, again, welcome aboard, Clarkie.

- Clarkie

Clarkie, sounds awesome we have a lot of barns like you’re describing around here, I sort of wish we had found a house with one like that but on the flip side the maintenance seems a little daunting.

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NickinWI

39 posts in 418 days


#15 posted 10-30-2018 12:41 AM

How important is having water on the main floor?

I have they yard hydrant in the lower level and I could easily tap off of that to run a supply line up to a utility sink and then run a drain down to the sump crock. I would obviously have to drain the supply line at the end of the day in the winter but during the summer it could stay live all season long.

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fly2low

88 posts in 664 days


#16 posted 11-01-2018 07:51 PM

I would not bother. I know what it means to have a water line in an unheated space in winter in WI

-- Rich Gig Harbor, WA

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Brawler

91 posts in 398 days


#17 posted 11-14-2018 10:01 PM

Hello Nick, cool shop. I am envious of how much space you will have. You seem to have a good handle on the electrical requirements. Remember you can only run one tool at a time (+DC) anyway. So it depends on the machines you are using. What size DC do you have, tablesaw, etc.. You may run into issues with a 40 amp service if you are going to run two 3HP motors at the same time. That would be about 36 amps + start current + shop lights + the blower for the heater that you will have etc..
You are going to have a lot of fun putting that shop together. I am just finishing my initial shop now. What I mean by initial is I’m not done with things like outfeed table, planer cart, wood rack/ cart,stuff like that. I do have the basic infrastructure done and aquired most of my tools. Again have fun, I really enjoyed putting my shop together.

-- Daniel

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NickinWI

39 posts in 418 days


#18 posted 11-15-2018 01:46 AM

Thanks for the feedback, 40 amps definitely isn’t ideal but luckily I haven’t purchased a lot of the equipment that I have planned so I can adjust as needed. I only have a jobsite TS so I still have to get a good unit and I don’t have a DC at all. I’ll definitely be going with as many 220v pieces of equipment as possible but being just a hobbyist I think a 1.5 or 2 HP DC will be adequate. Like you said putting the shop together is as much fun as actually having a shop for me. Thanks again!


Hello Nick, cool shop. I am envious of how much space you will have. You seem to have a good handle on the electrical requirements. Remember you can only run one tool at a time (+DC) anyway. So it depends on the machines you are using. What size DC do you have, tablesaw, etc.. You may run into issues with a 40 amp service if you are going to run two 3HP motors at the same time. That would be about 36 amps + start current + shop lights + the blower for the heater that you will have etc..
You are going to have a lot of fun putting that shop together. I am just finishing my initial shop now. What I mean by initial is I m not done with things like outfeed table, planer cart, wood rack/ cart,stuff like that. I do have the basic infrastructure done and aquired most of my tools. Again have fun, I really enjoyed putting my shop together.

- Brawler


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NickinWI

39 posts in 418 days


#19 posted 11-16-2018 12:57 AM

Had this big elm taken down. I always try to avoid taking down trees but I’m pretty sure that’s the tree that did the damage to the roof in the past and with the one shoot overhanging the barn pretty far it just wasn’t worth the risk to me.

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NickinWI

39 posts in 418 days


#20 posted 11-16-2018 07:42 PM

I got to work on the ceiling/collar ties today. I set the laser level on one end of the building and then worked my way back to it. I put up a ledger board on 1 side and then set the otherside with one screw and then worked my way back and forth which worked out well. I put the ceiling height right at 9’ which is really nice but only leaves me about 1.5’ of attic space. I could definitely do it but I’m really hoping that I never have to get up there.

Here it is all done. The missing one will be put up when I replace the garage door and the subsequent mounting brackets.

In other news I received some new additions for the shop: a 60v tracksaw and a long awaited planer.

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Smitty_Cabinetshop

16261 posts in 3185 days


#21 posted 11-16-2018 08:52 PM

Nice progress!

-- Don't anthropomorphize your handplanes. They hate it when you do that. -- OldTools Archive --

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JCamp

1014 posts in 1118 days


#22 posted 11-16-2018 09:31 PM

Looks great man. I’m envious. I love old barns and have wanted to build one for years but with no livestock I don’t have a good excuse to do it. Lol.

-- Whatsoever thy hand findeth to do, do it with all thy might

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NickinWI

39 posts in 418 days


#23 posted 11-20-2018 06:40 PM

So I’ve finally made some progress of note. I wired and installed (6) 4’ led shop lights. I picked them up from Menards for $15 each when they were on sale. I also wired outlets on each side so when I add the knee braces up top I can put 2 more lights on each side since a lot of the tools will be up against the side walls. Overall I’m happy with them but I am glad I added the side outlets because there are shadows over there. The boxes and lights are just mounted temporarily as I plan to do a steel ceiling and need to figure out the exact rib layout so that they don’t interfere.

I also installed a motion light on the outside. It is made by RAB and I ordered it from Amazon. It wasn’t cheap at $89 but it is a much better quality than the home store ones that I haven’t had luck with. Then I wired up boxes for 2 barn lights that are on my Christmas list and will go above the overhead door corners. I wired those to a 3 way switch so that when the switch is in the down position the motion light sensor will turn them on but they can still be turned on independently of the motion light. I’ve only very briefly tested the motion sensor but I am happy with it so far.

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NickinWI

39 posts in 418 days


#24 posted 12-04-2018 08:14 PM

My new garage door finally showed up at Menards last week so I picked that up and got to work playing musical garage doors. The garage door that for the lower level was rotten and disintegrating from being left open below the leaking roof. Since the upper and lower garage doors were the same size I moved the original upper door to the lower level and installed a new insulated door above. Now for the first time in well over a decade the barn can be completely closed up and secure.

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NickinWI

39 posts in 418 days


#25 posted 12-05-2018 10:12 PM

The barn has always had a small scuttle hole for a ladder on the back wall but my plans necessitate a stairway so I got to work enlarging the hole. Although far more precise than required I did use this opportunity to try out my new tracksaw. I’m really impressed with that thing, not only does it cut a perfectly straight line but it is easily the most smooth circular saw I’ve ever used. Next up is making the stair stringers and getting them installed.

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NickinWI

39 posts in 418 days


#26 posted 12-13-2018 10:25 PM

Today I was able to get started on the stairs. I’ve never built stairs before but it went pretty well. I ended up with a 7.5” rise and run. It’s a little steep but no steeper than the stairs in my first house and definitely less steep than the ladder. Using a 45 degree slope really makes all the measuring easier. The stairs will end up about 36” wide and there will be about 36” between the final step and the back wall/horse door below. The horse door will not be able to open completely anymore but I don’t plan to use that often once the stairs are in place. If I do find myself using that door more I will replace it with a standard out-swing walk door. I may also eventually install a 32” door on the bottom stair tread when I do the insulation just to keep the heat in a little better, but I don’t love that idea so we’ll see. I need to finish up some trim work on the opening, Build the wall and then I can install the treads/risers.

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NickinWI

39 posts in 418 days


#27 posted 12-19-2018 12:35 AM

A few days ago I did some work roughing out the opening which is over complicated because I am trying to recess the stair way into the area above the existing beam as far as possible to maximize the distance between the bottom stair tread and wall which ended up at about 36”. It’s not much but is enough to install a 32” door on the bottom stair in the future. Then yesterday I spent the day picking up. I am not always the most organized person when I work and sometimes I just need to take some time to organize everything. The only outlets in the upstairs at the moment are switched outlets for the lights so I hung some scrap near one that is prepped for future lights and used that for charging batteries. I’m glad I did because I’ve now decided that I will add some dedicated charger outlets that will be tied into the lighting circuit since I’m not a fan of leaving chargers on when the barn is unoccupied. I made the lighting circuit a 20 amp so I’m not concerned about overloading it with a few battery chargers.

Today I spent the day working on the half wall for the stairway. I wanted to build the wall before mounting the stringers so that I didn’t have to notch out the wall sheeting for each tread and riser. I built the wall on the floor and then installed the sheeting. Then I put a ledger board on the wall so that when I flipped it up it would land in it’s final location and not fall further since none of the studs extend all the way to the lower level floor. I roughed the half wall height at 33.25” so that when a trim board is added it will end up right at 34”. That way I can use it as an in-feed support for a table saw since 34” is the standard table height. The dog still isn’t quite sure what to make of the stair-less stairway but it will be done soon enough. The stringers are now permanently mounted and next up are the treads and risers and then I can finally stop teetering on the center stringer while going up and down.

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jonah

2092 posts in 3866 days


#28 posted 12-19-2018 02:32 PM

Looks fantastic, nice progress!

I’m jealous of the space.

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ArtMann

1448 posts in 1383 days


#29 posted 12-19-2018 03:15 PM

I have really enjoyed your narration and photos. I love to do restoration carpentry.

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NickinWI

39 posts in 418 days


#30 posted 12-19-2018 03:23 PM



Looks fantastic, nice progress!

I m jealous of the space.

- jonah

Thanks for following along Jonah!


I have really enjoyed your narration and photos. I love to do restoration carpentry.

- ArtMann

I appreciate that ArtMann, it’s good to know someone is reading all of my babbling. I’m enjoying the process and learning a lot along the way.

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GR8HUNTER

6710 posts in 1280 days


#31 posted 12-19-2018 03:45 PM

your buddy looking at you like hey you forgot something LOL :<)) coming along very nicely

-- Tony---- Reinholds,Pa.------ REMEMBER TO ALWAYS HAVE FUN

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NickinWI

39 posts in 418 days


#32 posted 12-19-2018 10:50 PM

Today I started by cutting the 2×10’s into stair treads. I temporarily set them in place and then numbered them as they came out. I commissioned the under powered but always reliable craftsman 8 inch table saw to trim them all to an even depth and remove the rounded over edges for a more finished look. Ironically enough after squaring the one edge I set up the router table to further round over the other edge. I would have liked to use a 3/4” round over bit to give full bullnose but the largest I had was a 1/2” radius. Finally I set up a quick “jig” to drill the holes in the risers so that they all end up in the same place, this was completely unnecessary but it improves the appearance a bit. The track saw came in handy when I started cutting the 1/2” plywood into risers. After that there was nothing left to but to do it and it come together well.

I gave it my best effort but I couldn’t convince the inspector to give them a try. He’s always been a cautious dog and stairs that just appeared out of no where seemed to have thrown him for a loop. He’ll get there on his own time. I’ve still got lots of trimming out before I can call them complete but they feel pretty good and are now functioning stairs.

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Chad_B

54 posts in 967 days


#33 posted 12-20-2018 05:04 PM

Looks great, are you going to make the upstairs a finishing room?

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Smitty_Cabinetshop

16261 posts in 3185 days


#34 posted 12-20-2018 05:24 PM

Count me among the folks reading and enjoying the progress shots and narrative. Nice job!

-- Don't anthropomorphize your handplanes. They hate it when you do that. -- OldTools Archive --

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NickinWI

39 posts in 418 days


#35 posted 12-20-2018 05:46 PM


Looks great, are you going to make the upstairs a finishing room?

- Chad_B

Thanks Chad, the upper level will be the main wood shop while the lower level will house the dust collector/ducting, compressor, lumber storage and whatever else ends up down there. Like the mustang currently stored in there until completion of the pole barn I’m putting up for storage as well as automotive and metal working fun.

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NickinWI

39 posts in 418 days


#36 posted 12-20-2018 05:46 PM



Count me among the folks reading and enjoying the progress shots and narrative. Nice job!

- Smitty_Cabinetshop

Thanks for following along!

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NickinWI

39 posts in 418 days


#37 posted 12-21-2018 07:59 PM

I didn’t have time to work on the barn today but the warmer weather gave me the opportunity to work on another “wood” working project. Late last summer lightning struck large willow tree down by a creek that runs through the property about 100 yards from the barn. When it initially happened I left a few large logs lying partially in the creek because it was still flowing fine and frankly I was being lazy. Once the cold weather came the logs slowed the water enough to freeze and dam up the Creek and I feared that with the snow melt in spring I would end up with a flooded yard if they weren’t removed.

I don’t have any heavy(ish) equipment to help with this job so I attached a ratchet strap to the logs. I then cut the offending half with the chain saw and drug them out with my truck.

Overall in went pretty smoothly and after clearing a few other areas the creek is now flowing smoothly.

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NickinWI

39 posts in 418 days


#38 posted 12-24-2018 07:24 PM

I am back to working on the barn and started the day by anchoring the lower board and stair stringers to the concrete. I made sure to drill all the way through the concrete so that if I ever need to remove this board I can punch the anchors all the way through and slip it out without disassembling the entire stair case. This is because I might someday want to replace the concrete in the barn because it’s in pretty sad shape and only covers half of the floor currently.

After that was done I started finishing off the stairwell “ceiling.” I trimmed the floor joists and then added a support board. I then cut a piece of 3/4” plywood to finish it off and positioned it so that when the 1/2 plywood ceiling is added below it would butt up flush to it.

Then I moved on to completing the half wall return. When I cut the 3/4” beveled ceiling panel I ran it long so that I could maintain as much floor space as possible. The wall sort of sits on top of the 3/4” panel and is secured in place so that when the 1/2” plywood is installed it will also butt up flush with the 3/4” panel. When I initially cut the hole for the stairwell I ballparked the opening hoping there would be enough head room. As it stands I have about 3” of headroom when I naturally walk down the stairs and I’m over 6’ tall so although it doesn’t meet code for a residential dwelling it functions perfectly and I’ve preserved as much floor space as possible.

That’s all for today and maybe a few days with the holidays. Hope everyone has a Merry Christmas!

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Mike_in_STL

1083 posts in 1101 days


#39 posted 12-24-2018 07:49 PM

Following as well. Nice work!

-- Sawdust makes me whole --Mike in STL

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NickinWI

39 posts in 418 days


#40 posted 12-26-2018 11:23 PM

With barn lights being all the rage right now I figured I’d install some on an actual barn. I wired them to a 3 way switch so that when in the down position they come on with the motion light but in the up position the stay on independent of the motion light status. I’m really pleased with they way they turned out and their size is perfect for the relatively small barn.

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Eric

79 posts in 440 days


#41 posted 12-27-2018 02:35 AM

Great restoration, I could use a building like on my property. But I will have to wait for a build in the spring.

I really like the idea of using a few outlets tied into the lights.

Keep up with the good work.

-- Eric, Upstate South Carolina

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NickinWI

39 posts in 418 days


#42 posted 12-27-2018 01:24 PM



Great restoration, I could use a building like on my property. But I will have to wait for a build in the spring.

I really like the idea of using a few outlets tied into the lights.

Keep up with the good work.

- Eric

Thanks Eric! Make sure to document your build when you get started, I was a little late on that and wish I would have started sooner.

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Smitty_Cabinetshop

16261 posts in 3185 days


#43 posted 12-27-2018 05:08 PM

The first step out of that door is a doozy… and it looks like a challenge to correct. Lighting looks great!

-- Don't anthropomorphize your handplanes. They hate it when you do that. -- OldTools Archive --

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NickinWI

39 posts in 418 days


#44 posted 12-27-2018 05:14 PM



The first step out of that door is a doozy… and it looks like a challenge to correct. Lighting looks great!

- Smitty_Cabinetshop

Good eye but it’s not as bad as it probably looks. Standing on my right foot and stepping in with the left makes a relatively natural and vise versa going out. When I get annoyed enough and the ground isn’t frozen I’ll sink 4 posts in the ground and build a small 4’ x 4’ deck in front of the walk door with a railing on the left side.

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Smitty_Cabinetshop

16261 posts in 3185 days


#45 posted 12-27-2018 05:58 PM

That sounds like a good plan, I’m sure you’ll get used to it quickly once it’s there. ;-)

-- Don't anthropomorphize your handplanes. They hate it when you do that. -- OldTools Archive --

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Mike_in_STL

1083 posts in 1101 days


#46 posted 12-27-2018 06:17 PM


The first step out of that door is a doozy… and it looks like a challenge to correct. Lighting looks great!

- Smitty_Cabinetshop

Good eye but it s not as bad as it probably looks. Standing on my right foot and stepping in with the left makes a relatively natural and vise versa going out. When I get annoyed enough and the ground isn t frozen I ll sink 4 posts in the ground and build a small 4 x 4 deck in front of the walk door with a railing on the left side.

- NickinWI


Why not build a retaining wall to the left of the building and backfill with gravel? Less work than driving four 4×4s. No deck though, but much easier transition. I’m envious of your space. My better 3/4 is grumbling about parking the car in the garage/shop. Wish I had a big space like yours to escape to and not worry about the logistics of parking a vehicle in a woodshop.

-- Sawdust makes me whole --Mike in STL

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NickinWI

39 posts in 418 days


#47 posted 12-27-2018 07:17 PM


The first step out of that door is a doozy… and it looks like a challenge to correct. Lighting looks great!

- SmittyCabinetshop

Good eye but it s not as bad as it probably looks. Standing on my right foot and stepping in with the left makes a relatively natural and vise versa going out. When I get annoyed enough and the ground isn t frozen I ll sink 4 posts in the ground and build a small 4 x 4 deck in front of the walk door with a railing on the left side.

- NickinWI

Why not build a retaining wall to the left of the building and backfill with gravel? Less work than driving four 4×4s. No deck though, but much easier transition. I m envious of your space. My better 3/4 is grumbling about parking the car in the garage/shop. Wish I had a big space like yours to escape to and not worry about the logistics of parking a vehicle in a woodshop.

- Mikein_STL

That’s a good option as well, I’m just concerned about back filling too far up the siding which is about 1’ down from the threashold. In all honesty there’s a good chance I’ll take the lazy way and just put some cinder blocks down lol.

It should turn out nice in the end. I used to just set all my tools up in the driveway every time I took on a wood working project which wasn’t convenient at all.

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Smitty_Cabinetshop

16261 posts in 3185 days


#48 posted 12-27-2018 08:40 PM

I saw that siding and figured getting a small deck installed wouldn’t be bad at all. Maybe only requires two posts if anchored to the building.

-- Don't anthropomorphize your handplanes. They hate it when you do that. -- OldTools Archive --

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NickinWI

39 posts in 418 days


#49 posted 12-28-2018 10:06 PM

As I’ve mentioned before the barn is supplied with 40 amp/240v service which was going to a small 8 circuit sub panel. I decided early on that the panel wasn’t big enough for what I wanted to do.

On the property there is also a small 10’ x 20’ garden shed that had its own service drop. I had the service permanently disconnected because I would never be willing to pay the $15 monthly meter charge for a garden shed. With that disconnected there was no reason I couldn’t steal the 12 circuit panel out of the shed to use in the barn.

As soon as I removed the panel cover I started to question the decision as the stench of mouse urine hit me but I grabbed some gloves and pressed on. I disconnected everything and brought it over to the barn.

It took quite a bit of futzing around but I was able to completely disconnect the old panel. Unfortunately I had to replace the wood blocking before mounting the “new” panel.

I’ve still got to get a few knockouts to plug in the now unused openings but here it is all finished up and ready to go to work.

All in all it was a lot of work to gain just 4 extra slots but those 4 slots were the difference between have (4) 240v circuits and having just (2) so to me it was more than worth it. The panel isn’t brand new and shiny but neither is the barn so it doesn’t bother me. An additional benefit to changing out the old panel is that the “new” one has a main disconnect. Being a 100 amp breaker it doesn’t provide any circuit protection since that is done in the house panel with a 40 amp breaker but it does allow me to energize the panel without going back to the house basement.

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NickinWI

39 posts in 418 days


#50 posted 01-08-2019 11:38 PM

I finished up the rough framing on one half of the barn. The knee wall and knee braces are now installed and it all worked out well although I did have to notch out the plywood gusset plates a bit.. The lower wall is 42” high so that I can have a 36” work bench with some room left for outlets above it. Both the middle and upper wall are 47” to minimize the waste when I sheet it with plywood.

In other news I finally purchased a Porter Cable 7518 so that I have one dedicated to the router table and one for portable use. It’s amazing how much larger and heavier a 3 1/4 horsepower router is than a 2 1/4 horsepower one.

On new years eve we had a snow fall that left us with a winter wonderland so I got this cool picture of the barn and scenery.

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