LumberJocks

All Replies on fine thread tapping

  • Advertise with us
View BlasterStumps's profile

fine thread tapping

by BlasterStumps
posted 10-27-2018 05:32 PM


9 replies so far

View Bill White's profile

Bill White

5228 posts in 4498 days


#1 posted 10-27-2018 07:48 PM

Well thought out Blaster. Sure beats tryin’ to eyeball vertical.

-- [email protected]

View AAL's profile

AAL

80 posts in 1964 days


#2 posted 10-27-2018 08:20 PM

Good idea & application of this tool. Well done! I also have this tool & your technique looks like a great way to have a “portable” tapping device, in addition to using it as a manual drill press..

An alternate, but somewhat similar method that I use is my drill press where I place my hand on the handle to add just a touch of weight while manually turning the chuck. This keeps things vertical while minimizing any chance of tap breakage.

-- "Socialism is a philosophy of failure, the creed of ignorance, and the gospel of envy, its inherent virtue is the equal sharing of misery." Winston Churchill

View Kazooman's profile

Kazooman

1378 posts in 2489 days


#3 posted 10-27-2018 09:29 PM



Good idea & application of this tool. Well done! I also have this tool & your technique looks like a great way to have a “portable” tapping device, in addition to using it as a manual drill press..

An alternate, but somewhat similar method that I use is my drill press where I place my hand on the handle to add just a touch of weight while manually turning the chuck. This keeps things vertical while minimizing any chance of tap breakage.

- AAL

I have also used my drill press to stabilize a tap when I am trying to get it started. One point to add is to loosen the tension on the belts so you are just twisting the quill by hand and not the entire pulley/belt/idler-pulley/belt/motor-pulley/motor train by hand. Don’t ask how I learned this.

The OP’s use of one of those drill guides (I recall them being called a “Portalign”, probably a brand name) is a great idea. Much more versatile than being wedded to the drill press. And, there are no pesky pulleys/belts/pulleys/belts/etc. to contend with.

View Andybb's profile

Andybb

2150 posts in 1141 days


#4 posted 10-28-2018 01:07 AM

I have one of those I haven’t used for years! I Never think about it until after I’m done doing something that it would have been perfect for. Taps would be a good use. Thanks.

-- Andy - Seattle USA

View BlasterStumps's profile

BlasterStumps

1446 posts in 977 days


#5 posted 10-28-2018 03:39 AM

If I could find something to extend the shaft of the jig about 6 to 8 ”, I could lose the keyless chuck and bolt and all and it might not look so awful. I’ll have to keep an eye out for something. Drill bit extender possibly.

-- "I build for function first, looks second. Most times I never get around to looks." - Mike, western Colorado

View lumbering_on's profile

lumbering_on

578 posts in 1027 days


#6 posted 10-28-2018 04:19 AM



I have one of those I haven t used for years! I Never think about it until after I m done doing something that it would have been perfect for. Taps would be a good use. Thanks.

- Andybb

Funny, I was thinking that this was the only time I could see that tool being useful. :)

View MrRon's profile

MrRon

5767 posts in 3781 days


#7 posted 10-28-2018 03:29 PM

As a machinist, I can tell you the right way to thread a hole. First of all, what is the material that you are tapping into? Second, what kind of tap are you using, a carbon steel one or high speed steel? Carbon steel taps, like the ones found in big box stores or hardware stores are soft and will break easily. Third, any tapping should be done using a suitable lubricant. Tapping without a lubricant guarantees a broken tap. Hand taps come in sets of three, taper, plug and bottoming. This is only a minute discussion of tapping, as there are many forms of taps, but if you at least follow the lubrication tip, you will be able to successfully thread without breakage. Breaking a small tap is a big pain when trying to extract the broken tap from the hole. One other point I failed to mention; make sure you have drilled the correct size hole for the tap used. Here is a chart that will give you the correct size drill http://www.americanfastener.com/tap-and-drill-size-chart/

View BlasterStumps's profile

BlasterStumps

1446 posts in 977 days


#8 posted 10-28-2018 06:36 PM

My little tap broke because like a dummy I ran it too deep and didn’t notice it until suddenly it snapped off. I’m a “bull in a china closet” when it comes to little tiny fine stuff I’m afraid. My taps unfortunately are like most of the rest of my tools, a collection from who knows where so I have no idea the quality of them. You are right as rain about how a broken tap can become a pain. I sure messed up the project I was working on because I broke a tap. I was muttering to myself for about an hour afterwards. : )

-- "I build for function first, looks second. Most times I never get around to looks." - Mike, western Colorado

View BlasterStumps's profile

BlasterStumps

1446 posts in 977 days


#9 posted 10-29-2018 03:33 AM

I made an extension for the General drill guide. Looks better to my eye. : )

-- "I build for function first, looks second. Most times I never get around to looks." - Mike, western Colorado

Have your say...

You must be signed in to reply.

DISCLAIMER: Any posts on LJ are posted by individuals acting in their own right and do not necessarily reflect the views of LJ. LJ will not be held liable for the actions of any user.

Latest Projects | Latest Blog Entries | Latest Forum Topics

HomeRefurbers.com