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View deadherring's profile

Using Epoxy to fill gaps

by deadherring
posted 10-25-2018 01:49 AM


11 replies so far

View lumbering_on's profile

lumbering_on

578 posts in 971 days


#1 posted 10-25-2018 02:21 AM

Epoxy has a habit of running out, so you need to tape it really well, and put something underneath to avoid having your boards stick to the table. Also, if you are filling large gaps, then sheathing tape or something similar is the way to go.

View John Smith's profile

John Smith

1971 posts in 643 days


#2 posted 10-25-2018 11:16 AM

it is a matter of adding a ton more tape to make sure it doesn’t leak out.
just take your time when taping the seams and try to envision the epoxy trail.

and then – let the first pour cure (or at least gel up) prior to adding more epoxy.
eventually, all the leak avenues will seal and you will end up with a nice fill.

I guess the first questions should be:
what kind of wood are you experiencing leak issues with
how big are the gaps
what kind of tape are you using
is the epoxy leaking between the tape overlaps or between the wood and tape.
if you are going to be doing a lot of this kind of work, maybe invest in a higher
quality vinyl tape like 3M or ShurTape “Stucco Tape”. available at most Box Stores.
a small rubber roller is a handy tool to have in your box.

.

-- I am a painter. That's what I do. I paint things --

View Robert's profile

Robert

3516 posts in 1961 days


#3 posted 10-25-2018 01:34 PM

Sometimes its easier to just clamp a piece of wood over the tape.

-- Everything is a prototype thats why its one of a kind!!

View Gene Howe's profile

Gene Howe

11758 posts in 3909 days


#4 posted 10-25-2018 02:18 PM

Cover the board with packing tape then clamp it.

-- Gene 'The true soldier fights not because he hates what is in front of him, but because he loves what is behind him.' G. K. Chesterton

View deadherring's profile

deadherring

83 posts in 2124 days


#5 posted 10-25-2018 02:23 PM

Thanks guys, good ideas, I was thinking clamping it would be good.

Dumb question: On the top side of the board, I put tape on either side of the crack, thinking if I spilled epoxy while pouring it in, it would make clean up easier. Now I’m thinking that might be a bad idea since the epoxy might actually seal the tape on the board making it much more difficult. Am I better off taking the tape off and then just try to wipe up any spillage? Or leave the spillage and plan to sand flush?

Thanks.

View John Smith's profile

John Smith

1971 posts in 643 days


#6 posted 10-25-2018 02:30 PM

I guess the first questions should be:
what kind of wood are you experiencing leak issues with
how big are the gaps
what kind of tape are you using
is the epoxy leaking between the tape overlaps or between the wood and tape.
if you are going to be doing a lot of this kind of work, maybe invest in a higher
quality vinyl tape like 3M or ShurTape “Stucco Tape”. available at most Box Stores.
even some photos of your project would be helpful.
- John Smith -

this is my Leak Management System for Epoxy.

.

-- I am a painter. That's what I do. I paint things --

View Rich's profile

Rich

4826 posts in 1070 days


#7 posted 10-25-2018 02:54 PM

Working with mesquite, I have poured literally gallons of epoxy into voids. I’ve tried every type of tape, clamping, etc and found there are only a couple of foolproof methods.

The best is to use a thickened paste of epoxy on one side of the board. You can buy silica thickener and use that to make an epoxy paste that will not flow. Use a craft stick to spread it over the cracks, let it cure, then fill with regular epoxy from the other side. This method is great because you can spread it on the side for any end grain checking, partial knots on the edge of the board or anything else.

If you choose to stick with tape (pun intended), the trick is to do two pours. It’s gravity that’s your enemy and causing the leaking you’re experiencing, so make your first pour just enough to seal the crack on the tape side. Let that cure enough so it doesn’t flow and do your final pour to completely fill the crack or void.

-- There's no such thing as a careless electrician

View runswithscissors's profile

runswithscissors

3060 posts in 2506 days


#8 posted 10-27-2018 04:14 AM

Remember how, when you were a kid, and you spread honey on a piece of toast with a hole in it? And the honey ran all over your hand? Well, epoxy’s like that. But there is an upside to this (you can work out your own pun here): epoxy tends to reach into all the nooks and crannies that need filling, especially if you can get any bubbles out.

-- I admit to being an adrenaline junky; fortunately, I'm very easily frightened

View Andybb's profile

Andybb

2029 posts in 1084 days


#9 posted 10-31-2018 08:25 PM

The first few responses are the norm for leak mgmt, but I like Rich’s idea. Have to try that. It’s always a crap shoot if the tape will seal. The epoxy heats up pretty hot as it cures and melts the stickem on the tape.

-- Andy - Seattle USA

View Andybb's profile

Andybb

2029 posts in 1084 days


#10 posted 10-31-2018 08:29 PM

The first few responses are the norm for leak mgmt, but I like Rich’s idea. Have to try that. It’s always a crap shoot if the tape will seal and sometimes it’s tough to get a clamp in the middle of the board. The epoxy heats up pretty hot as it cures and melts the stickem on the tape which I find to be the root cause of the leaks.

If not Rich’s method try only pouring enough epoxy in on your first pour & use tape to seal the bottom with about 1/4” and let it dry. That way you should get all of the nooks and crannies filled. Then finish when that layer is dry and hard.

-- Andy - Seattle USA

View deadherring's profile

deadherring

83 posts in 2124 days


#11 posted 11-02-2018 02:11 PM

Thanks for the advice, all. I got some stucco tape, double-taped the bottom and clamped a board on top of that and tried it again. I could not get the crack to fill despite pouring in more than enough to fill it, and when I took everything off the next day, I didn’t see any spillage. Weird. Only thing I can think of it maybe since its a butcher block glue up the epoxy seeped into the end grain.

I ended up getting a few different colors of wood putty from Home Depot and used it to fill the cracks. It worked great and I sanded down the excess and the gaps disappeared.

Thanks all.

Nathan

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