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View ScottM's profile

Anyone Tried This?

by ScottM
posted 10-24-2018 02:11 PM


19 replies so far

View GR8HUNTER's profile

GR8HUNTER

6067 posts in 1099 days


#1 posted 10-24-2018 02:20 PM

COOL TOOL :<))

-- Tony---- Reinholds,Pa.------ REMEMBER TO ALWAYS HAVE FUN

View pottz's profile (online now)

pottz

5239 posts in 1371 days


#2 posted 10-24-2018 02:24 PM

no but i might,i agree it could come in handy for small parts.

-- sawdust the bigger the pile the bigger my smile-larry,so cal.

View Gene Howe's profile (online now)

Gene Howe

11574 posts in 3815 days


#3 posted 10-24-2018 02:29 PM

Got a couple of them. Lots you can do with them. Great video to show some of it’s capabilities.

-- Gene 'The true soldier fights not because he hates what is in front of him, but because he loves what is behind him.' G. K. Chesterton

View GR8HUNTER's profile

GR8HUNTER

6067 posts in 1099 days


#4 posted 10-24-2018 02:39 PM



Got a couple of them. Lots you can do with them. Great video to show some of it s capabilities.

- Gene Howe


since you have a couple you going to pass them out Gene ? I will send you my address LOL :<))

-- Tony---- Reinholds,Pa.------ REMEMBER TO ALWAYS HAVE FUN

View EarlS's profile

EarlS

2785 posts in 2734 days


#5 posted 10-24-2018 02:39 PM

Certainly would be a good option for short or thin pieces that don’t work in a planer. I can think of lots of uses for it. Thanks for the info.

-- Earl "I'm a pessamist - generally that increases the chance that things will turn out better than expected"

View HokieKen's profile

HokieKen

9487 posts in 1525 days


#6 posted 10-24-2018 03:19 PM

Bear in mind that a drill press is not designed to take side loading, only axial. This is basically a flycutter or face mill that’s made to be chucked in a jacobs chuck. There is a reason you can’t effectively turn wood or mill stuff with a drill press though. First, your chuck is held in the quill with a tapered shaft. Side loading a tapered shaft fit with nothing drawing it axially is gonna make it fall out. Second, if you use something like this regularly, it’ll introduce runout in your drill press and eventually wear your bearings out.

Now all that said, I’m NOT saying this is a stupid idea! Taking light cuts and occasional use will most likely never produce any noticable ill-effects on your machine. Just wanted to point out that there are limitations and issues to bear in mind :-)

-- Kenny, SW VA, Go Hokies!!!

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LittleShaver

537 posts in 1006 days


#7 posted 10-24-2018 03:19 PM

I bought one at Leichtung Workshop back in the early 80’s. I may have used it once or twice over the years. It works, but scared the bejeezes out of me.

-- Sawdust Maker

View ScottM's profile

ScottM

733 posts in 2533 days


#8 posted 10-24-2018 03:27 PM



I bought one at Leichtung Workshop back in the early 80 s. I may have used it once or twice over the years. It works, but scared the bejeezes out of me.

- LittleShaver

Yeah, it does sort of remind me of the “fly cutters”. Those are scary too!!

View John Smith's profile

John Smith

1827 posts in 549 days


#9 posted 10-24-2018 04:27 PM

I have the 1970’s era Wagner Safe-T- Planer.
I use it in the drill press and it works as it should with no issues.
good thing about this tool is that if it grabs a finger,
the damage is not as severe as touching a spinning router bit or fly cutter.
I also have a few fly cutters – I guess I live closer to the edge than most people.

my first few tries with the Safety Planer were also a bit scary – but- I found that if
you don’t cut the wood to the finished size first, keeping a long tail to work with,
it is much, much safer. then, cut to size after the desired thickness has been achieved.

-- Failure is proof that you at least tried ~ now, go do it again, and again, until you get it right --

View fivecodys's profile

fivecodys

1425 posts in 2022 days


#10 posted 10-24-2018 04:46 PM


I bought one at Leichtung Workshop back in the early 80 s. I may have used it once or twice over the years. It works, but scared the bejeezes out of me.

- LittleShaver

Yeah, it does sort of remind me of the “fly cutters”. Those are scary too!!

- ScottM

I thought the same thing as well. I have one of those “Knuckle Busting” circle cutter and that thing scares me to death. I have only used it once.

-- When you leave your shop for the night, make sure you can always count to 10.

View oldnovice's profile

oldnovice

7482 posts in 3754 days


#11 posted 10-24-2018 05:11 PM

Had one, didn’t like it at all, sold to a fellow lumberjocka couple of years ago!

-- "I never met a board I didn't like!"

View WoodenDreams's profile

WoodenDreams

602 posts in 297 days


#12 posted 10-24-2018 06:06 PM

I don’t like to use a drill press as a spindle sander or a router alternative. But I can see the applications. $55 doesn’t seem to be a bad price. If you got one, how often would you use it though? I like the simple drill press table, with his swinging fence in the video link.

View pottz's profile (online now)

pottz

5239 posts in 1371 days


#13 posted 10-24-2018 06:16 PM

well after everyones feedback i think ill put this idea back in the box-lol.

-- sawdust the bigger the pile the bigger my smile-larry,so cal.

View JayT's profile

JayT

6205 posts in 2597 days


#14 posted 10-24-2018 07:10 PM


Bear in mind that a drill press is not designed to take side loading, only axial. This is basically a flycutter or face mill that s made to be chucked in a jacobs chuck.

- HokieKen

Yes, but if you own a milling machine, this might be handy for working pieces that are too short to go through the planer. For the price, I’ll definitely have to consider. It’d be much faster than facing off a piece of wood with multiple passes of a 3/4in end mill (which I have done)

-- https://www.jtplaneworks.com - In theory, there is no difference between theory and practice. In practice, there is.

View lumbering_on's profile

lumbering_on

578 posts in 876 days


#15 posted 10-24-2018 09:32 PM



I have the 1970 s era Wagner Safe-T- Planer.
I use it in the drill press and it works as it should with no issues.
good thing about this tool is that if it grabs a finger,
the damage is not as severe as touching a spinning router bit or fly cutter.
I also have a few fly cutters – I guess I live closer to the edge than most people.

...
- John Smith

Something about the phrase ‘good thing’ in this context seems a bit off. But I can’t put my finger on it…..;)

View pottz's profile (online now)

pottz

5239 posts in 1371 days


#16 posted 10-24-2018 10:11 PM


I have the 1970 s era Wagner Safe-T- Planer.
I use it in the drill press and it works as it should with no issues.
good thing about this tool is that if it grabs a finger,
the damage is not as severe as touching a spinning router bit or fly cutter.
I also have a few fly cutters – I guess I live closer to the edge than most people.

...
- John Smith

Something about the phrase good thing in this context seems a bit off. But I can t put my finger on it…..;)

- lumbering_on

ditto- i guess it’ll just rip your finger to shreds but not take it completely off-LOL!

-- sawdust the bigger the pile the bigger my smile-larry,so cal.

View HokieKen's profile

HokieKen

9487 posts in 1525 days


#17 posted 10-25-2018 12:47 PM


Bear in mind that a drill press is not designed to take side loading, only axial. This is basically a flycutter or face mill that s made to be chucked in a jacobs chuck.

- HokieKen

Yes, but if you own a milling machine, this might be handy for working pieces that are too short to go through the planer. For the price, I ll definitely have to consider. It d be much faster than facing off a piece of wood with multiple passes of a 3/4in end mill (which I have done)

- JayT

Definitely useful in a mill. Now if only I had one…

-- Kenny, SW VA, Go Hokies!!!

View Planeman40's profile

Planeman40

1406 posts in 3147 days


#18 posted 10-25-2018 04:02 PM

Had one of these many years ago, didn’t think much of it, tossed it away.

-- Always remember: It is a mathematical certainty that half the people in this country are below average in intelligence!

View runswithscissors's profile

runswithscissors

3039 posts in 2411 days


#19 posted 10-27-2018 04:08 AM

I believe Wagner also made one that could be used on a radial arm saw. I used the drill press version to cut nicely profiled cove cuts for raised panels on a roll top desk. I should mention that it was a radial arm drill press, which allowed the power head to be tilted. It worked well, but left a lot of sanding to be done.

They are a “safety” planer because so little cutting edge is exposed that it can’t grab your work and cause a wicked kickback. There were other brands that were quite dangerous.

-- I admit to being an adrenaline junky; fortunately, I'm very easily frightened

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