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Anyone switching away from Sketchup?

by lumbering_on
posted 10-17-2018 02:31 AM


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55 replies so far

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Rick Dennington

6513 posts in 3558 days


#1 posted 10-17-2018 05:02 AM

lumbering_on,

I can’t answer your question, cause I’ve never learned to use Sketchup….I do all my drawings the old fashion way….on a drafting board…I got a degree in drafting back in the ‘70s, so I’ve always did it that way…There is just something about drafting by hand with a board, T- square, and a pencil, and a ruler…..For myself personally, it’s a challenge…..!!

-- " At my age, happy hour is a 2 hour nap".....!!

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therealSteveN

2633 posts in 938 days


#2 posted 10-17-2018 05:49 AM

I don’t have a drafting degree, but putting my thoughts on paper with a sharp pencil has always worked for me. Heck you can even source free graph paper online, a few layout tools you already have, and you are going.

Links to free graph paper, many can be scalable by taking the image on a thumb drive to a print place, and having them work the grid up to your specifications. Using 1/4” 1/2” and 1” blocks takes the work out of it. Place I go to can print a 60” x 80” grid, that’s a big project. You should be able to choose a thickness of paper too, so instead of an obscure %$#( on your computer you have a workable pattern. Learning curve for that is ZERO.

-- Think safe, be safe

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WoodenDreams

586 posts in 275 days


#3 posted 10-17-2018 07:31 AM

I don’t use sketch up, though there’s many that like it. I keep drafting pads it my shop & use a drafters ruler. and draw everything up myself, including material chart (cutting and final board size chart). Put all my plans in a three ring binder, sectioned under sub headings of projects.

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EarlS

2732 posts in 2712 days


#4 posted 10-17-2018 11:52 AM

Compared to traditional drafting or CAD, I’ll take SketchUp.

I’ve been using the free version of SketchUp for 2-3 years, off and on, and generally I’ve been satisfied with it. The 3D model is a great way to “build” something. Adding things like dovetails or mortise and tenons can be rather tedious and frustrating. Being able to make drawings of each piece with all of the dimensional details is also a nice feature, even though it can also be tedious.

-- Earl "I'm a pessamist - generally that increases the chance that things will turn out better than expected"

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lumbering_on

578 posts in 854 days


#5 posted 10-17-2018 11:54 AM

Unfortunately, my drawing skills are at such a high level that my stick men commit suicide. :(

My father actually bought my brother and I a drafting table when we were younger. It was a great table with the rubber sheet and the drafting ruler with the pulleys. I was fully capable of drawing straight lines, but that was actually about as far as I made it.

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fiddlebanshee

240 posts in 3310 days


#6 posted 10-17-2018 12:02 PM

Following because I too have been very disappointed with webversion of sketchup. I downloaded the last sketchup make version but after the trial period was over I was no longer able to download my projects from the web app into the stand alone version! Boooo! Had to redo several projects as my internet connection at home is just not fast enough to work online in the webapp. Sketchup seems to forget that not all users live in areas abundant with internet connection speed.

So far I have not been able to find any other stand alone program that doesn’t break the bank. So, if anyone has any suggestions, apart from pen and paper (lol) I’d also be very keen to hear them.

-- As if I needed another hobby!

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RichBolduc

879 posts in 481 days


#7 posted 10-17-2018 12:43 PM

I do everything in Solidworks.. It’s not free though… Starting license is like $3500, luckily I get a home use copy through work. If you’re a student, you can get a version for $99. I’ve been using SolidWorks since 2003.

Rich

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HokieKen

9254 posts in 1503 days


#8 posted 10-17-2018 12:52 PM

I use Solidworks as well. But, like Rich said, it’s not a viable option for most financially. In addition to student licenses, they also offer low-cost licenses to active/retired military.

There’s also an app for the iPad that a buddy of mine has been using that he’s doing pretty well with and liking. I don’t recall the name but there aren’t that many available. I’ve been tempted to try using my tablet for ease in the shop but I’m pretty ruined after using Solidworks…

-- Kenny, SW VA, Go Hokies!!!

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YesHaveSome

155 posts in 623 days


#9 posted 10-17-2018 01:58 PM

I started using Sketchup a couple of years ago and have never liked it. Over the past couple of months I’ve committed to Fusion 360 and love it and dont think I’ll ever use Sketchup again (I also use AutoCad).

Here’s what I like about Fusion vs Sketchup

1) Licensing: if you are a hobbyist or a startup (less than 100k revenue per year) then it’s free. Sketchup Make is free as well but their move to web based is a no no plus, technically, you arent allowed to use Make for any business purpose. You’re supposed to drop $600 on the pro license.

2) Parametric modeling: It’s a bit cumbersome to learn but once you get the hang of it, it’s awesome. You don’t have to have every single dimension thought out before starting. Just set the parameters and then change em up later and your design will update

3) Sketchup is glitchy (at least for me). There are too many times where Sketchup just doesnt do what it’s supposed to and it’s very frustrating.

4) Precision: it’s a lot easier to be precise with Fusion than Sketchup. I feel like Sketchup requires you to either eyeball it or drop construction lines all over the place to get things right where you need them.

I am not an expert in Sketchup so these perceived shortcomings might just be a lack of experience. I will say that Sketchup is easier to “just start drawing something”. Fusion is more cumbersome at first but once you get the hang of it things get a lot easier. There’s a ton of good tutorial series on YouTube.

-- But where does the meat go?

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bondogaposis

5371 posts in 2715 days


#10 posted 10-17-2018 02:04 PM

I am a long time user of CAD. I have tried to learn sketchup and really struggled with making the leap from 2D to 3D. In the end I fall back on CAD because for me it is just faster.

-- Bondo Gaposis

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Ripper70

1263 posts in 1273 days


#11 posted 10-17-2018 02:12 PM

Check this out. May be worth serious consideration.

Why switch from SketchUp to Blender

https://www.blender.org

-- "You know, I'm such a great driver, it's incomprehensible that they took my license away." --Vince Ricardo

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lumbering_on

578 posts in 854 days


#12 posted 10-17-2018 02:57 PM

YHS, thanks for the input on Fusion. I’ve hear a lot of good things about it, which is why I’m looking into it. There doesn’t seem to be as many woodworkers using it, so there are less resources, but it does seem worth the effort to learn it.

Rich, thanks for the info on Solidworks. Looks like I can get it for $40/year, so I’ll look into it.

Ripper, I’ve actually seen those resources, but Blender just seems to be a bit of overkill for what I’m looking for. I’ve seen one video where someone did a subway station in a few minutes, but I think the learning curve is likely a bit steep.

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Ocelot

2181 posts in 3002 days


#13 posted 10-17-2018 03:05 PM

I have used sketchup but not for a year or so. I didn’t know they were breaking it. It’s a pity. I found it fine for what I was doing.

I spent 20 years at Intergraph and in later years used mostly Bentley Microstation. It’s always been 3d as long as I can remember. Bentley will not sell me a cheap 10-year-old version for home use. So, I have used free sketchup. I have some former Intergraph friends who work for Bentley, but no “friends and family deal either”.

Microstation is now $5360, so not going to happen for me.

One of the mechanical engineers where I work uses Microstation, but probably a very old version.

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YesHaveSome

155 posts in 623 days


#14 posted 10-17-2018 03:23 PM



Check this out. May be worth serious consideration.

Why switch from SketchUp to Blender

https://www.blender.org

I tried Blender and it’s interface is a mess. I also learned that it’s not good for woodworking because it’s not meant to be precise. It’s insanely powerful and you can make some pretty amazing scenes with it but it’s just not geared towards something like woodworking.

- Ripper70


-- But where does the meat go?

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YesHaveSome

155 posts in 623 days


#15 posted 10-17-2018 03:27 PM



YHS, thanks for the input on Fusion. I ve hear a lot of good things about it, which is why I m looking into it. There doesn t seem to be as many woodworkers using it, so there are less resources, but it does seem worth the effort to learn it.

Rich, thanks for the info on Solidworks. Looks like I can get it for $40/year, so I ll look into it.

Ripper, I ve actually seen those resources, but Blender just seems to be a bit of overkill for what I m looking for. I ve seen one video where someone did a subway station in a few minutes, but I think the learning curve is likely a bit steep.

- lumbering_on

Check our Lars Christensen’s YouTube channel. Most of his stuff his engineering and CAM but he does quite a bit that is directly related to woodworking. He’s also very quick to respond to questions via email. Also, Jay Bates did a long tutorial that was pretty good. Paul Jenkins has done a few.

For me, the biggest hurdle was figuring how to approach the sketches so things worked together. Once I got that down I started to move pretty well. If you dont have to make things parametric you can move really quickly.

-- But where does the meat go?

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fiddlebanshee

240 posts in 3310 days


#16 posted 10-17-2018 03:42 PM

I looked at blender youtube tutorials and agree that this seems to be way too geared to game development.

The fusion360 videos by Lars Christensen make me want to check this out. I especially like the parametric approach since I fiddle around with dimensions quite a lot and it is a lot of work in sketchup, even if you work with components.

Thanks for all the suggestions!

-- As if I needed another hobby!

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YesHaveSome

155 posts in 623 days


#17 posted 10-17-2018 03:44 PM



I looked at blender youtube tutorials and agree that this seems to be way too geared to game development.

The fusion360 videos by Lars Christensen make me want to check this out. I especially like the parametric approach since I fiddle around with dimensions quite a lot and it is a lot of work in sketchup, even if you work with components.

Thanks for all the suggestions!

- fiddlebanshee

I am currently designing a buffet that I am about to build for someone. I am not sure on the dimensions yet so I’ve made the whole thing parametric. I can adjust everything from door openings, drawer sizes, overall length, height, depth, material thickness, etc. It’s pretty awesome. It was my first go round trying to do that so it’s been a lot of trial and error and taken forever but a great learning experience.

-- But where does the meat go?

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mramseyISU

572 posts in 1909 days


#18 posted 10-17-2018 04:02 PM

I’m a design engineer by trade so I end up using the CAD system of my employer. For a long time that was SolidWorks and I was pretty good at it. Three years ago I switched employers and now that tool is Creo (Pro E). I’m not a fan but it still get’s the job done.

-- Trust me I'm an engineer.

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xeddog

230 posts in 3371 days


#19 posted 10-17-2018 04:22 PM

If you don’t like Sketchup because it’s web based, then you might not like Fusion 360 either. Fusion requires an internet connection because all of your designs are stored in the Fusion Cloud. Even so, I still use it but not for woodworking.
You mentioned Solidworks for $40/yr. I recently “re-upped” my Solidworks license as a US military vet (which is also good for Canadian military vets), and it was only $25/yr.

Wayne

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bilyo

661 posts in 1467 days


#20 posted 10-17-2018 04:31 PM

I use an older version of Sketchup Make, but don’t use it often and I’m certainly not an expert. AFAIK, you don’t have to use the on-line version (unless something has recently changed). Once you have a version downloaded and working it will continue to work and you can continue to use it. You don’t have to use the latest updated version. In my case, my combination of computer hardware and OS won’t run the latest version (don’t remember why at the moment). So, I just continue to use the latest one that will run.
Also, if you google “sketchup alternatives” you will find a number of other programs that will do similar things. Some of those mentioned above are included.

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RevenantJoiner

30 posts in 715 days


#21 posted 10-17-2018 04:43 PM

Fusion 360 here. I did very little dabbling in Sketchup, but was not convinced it was worth the effort. The parametric capability of Fusion 360 sold me on moving to a CAD program over paper or Sketchup. Also the ability to post a colored, textured version of a final drawing to the web where it can be shared with others is a winner. Rough first attempt here (Note: joints were not drawn – most are floating tenons.)- Its drawing output is very flexible as to views and dimensioning.

-- Each time your start a project and work on it, a tree smiles knowing there’s life after death.

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jeffswildwood

3910 posts in 2341 days


#22 posted 10-17-2018 05:03 PM

I use a home version of Autosketch and it works for me. Not always for every project as it is tricky to use. Many times I resort to paper and pencil. My son gave me an abundance of green poster board and many times I can draw to scale. There are times the project starts in my head and gets drawn as I go.

-- We all make mistakes, the trick is to fix it in a way that says "I meant to do that".

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lumbering_on

578 posts in 854 days


#23 posted 10-17-2018 05:06 PM



If you don t like Sketchup because it s web based, then you might not like Fusion 360 either. Fusion requires an internet connection because all of your designs are stored in the Fusion Cloud. Even so, I still use it but not for woodworking.
You mentioned Solidworks for $40/yr. I recently “re-upped” my Solidworks license as a US military vet (which is also good for Canadian military vets), and it was only $25/yr.

Wayne

- xeddog

I’m not really worried about the Internet connection, although it’s nice to have everything local. I just find the web interface to be ‘clunky’ – that’s being rather generous.

The $40 was the CDN price that I got off the website. We get dinged a lot up here. :(

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YesHaveSome

155 posts in 623 days


#24 posted 10-17-2018 05:07 PM



If you don t like Sketchup because it s web based, then you might not like Fusion 360 either. Fusion requires an internet connection because all of your designs are stored in the Fusion Cloud. Even so, I still use it but not for woodworking.
You mentioned Solidworks for $40/yr. I recently “re-upped” my Solidworks license as a US military vet (which is also good for Canadian military vets), and it was only $25/yr.

Wayne

- xeddog

You can work offline in Fusion. Also, that’s completely different than Sketchup being web based. The new Sketchup works in the browser rather than being installed on your machine like previous versions and Fusion. Sketchup is buggy and laggy enough standalone. Can’t imagine how the web version would be.

-- But where does the meat go?

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fiddlebanshee

240 posts in 3310 days


#25 posted 10-17-2018 05:14 PM

If you don t like Sketchup because it s web based, then you might not like Fusion 360 either. Fusion requires an internet connection because all of your designs are stored in the Fusion Cloud. Even so, I still use it but not for woodworking.
You mentioned Solidworks for $40/yr. I recently “re-upped” my Solidworks license as a US military vet (which is also good for Canadian military vets), and it was only $25/yr.

Wayne

- xeddog

You can work offline in Fusion. Also, that s completely different than Sketchup being web based. The new Sketchup works in the browser rather than being installed on your machine like previous versions and Fusion. Sketchup is buggy and laggy enough standalone. Can t imagine how the web version would be.

- YesHaveSome

This exactly. The lag time between drawing a rectangle and it rendering on the screen in my case at home can be as much as 5 seconds in the webapp Too long to be useful. I liked the fact that I could make sketches somewhere else, save them to trimble connect and then download them in the standalone version on my home computer but this feature, while it was active for the trial period, has switched off for the ” make ” version of the standalone. So now I have to redraw if I want to work on something at home that I had previously made on the web app. And, as others have mentioned sketchup is buggy as it is so I’m now resigned to having only a program on my home computer and work on that, and having my lunch hours away from the computer at work, lol.

Still thinking that fusion 360 might be the ticket and I am fine with storing files in the cloud, as long as I am not relying on an internet connection to do the actual drawing. I’m liking what I find in the fusion tutorials on youtube. Will not be able to download until I get home, so can’t play around with it yet.

-- As if I needed another hobby!

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lumbering_on

578 posts in 854 days


#26 posted 10-17-2018 05:14 PM



Fusion 360 here. I did very little dabbling in Sketchup, but was not convinced it was worth the effort. The parametric capability of Fusion 360 sold me on moving to a CAD program over paper or Sketchup. Also the ability to post a colored, textured version of a final drawing to the web where it can be shared with others is a winner. Rough first attempt here (Note: joints were not drawn – most are floating tenons.)- Its drawing output is very flexible as to views and dimensioning.

- RevenantJoiner

Quick question – is the exploded view automatically done for you? I found it a lot of work to do in Sketchup.

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Dark_Lightning

3424 posts in 3473 days


#27 posted 10-17-2018 05:43 PM

Never used Sketchup, but I have Microsoft Visio Professional through my work. Most of my job was technical writing for mechanical test engineering, but I did a considerable amount of tool design both for fixturing and tools, with a side helping of mechanical ground support equipment.

-- Random Orbital Nailer

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RevenantJoiner

30 posts in 715 days


#28 posted 10-17-2018 06:46 PM

lumberin_on: see here and here for how to create an exploded view. The one that can be created in the online view I linked above is done by that web based view without any work on my part.

-- Each time your start a project and work on it, a tree smiles knowing there’s life after death.

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RevenantJoiner

30 posts in 715 days


#29 posted 10-17-2018 06:50 PM

lumberin_on: see here for how to create an exploded view. The one that can be created in the online view I linked above is done by that web based view without any work on my part.

After I added the second link, it turned out to be a second posting. I tried to delete this one, but no luck. How do you remove a posting within the editing time? I am able to add a comment such as this, but I can not delete the posting.

-- Each time your start a project and work on it, a tree smiles knowing there’s life after death.

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lumbering_on

578 posts in 854 days


#30 posted 10-17-2018 07:51 PM


lumberin_on: see here for how to create an exploded view. The one that can be created in the online view I linked above is done by that web based view without any work on my part.

After I added the second link, it turned out to be a second posting. I tried to delete this one, but no luck. How do you remove a posting within the editing time? I am able to add a comment such as this, but I can not delete the posting.

- RevenantJoiner

Thanks RJ. That looks so much easier than how I was doing it in Sketchup. I had to create a copy of the piece, then pull it apart. It wasn’t fun.

I don’t know if a post can be deleted. I just clear the second post and leave a comment that it was a double post.

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JADobson

1423 posts in 2475 days


#31 posted 10-17-2018 07:57 PM

I’m pretty sure you can still download the free sketchup so you don’t have to work from the awful browser based platform. Try here: https://help.sketchup.com/en/sketchup/downloading-sketchup

-- No craft is very far from the line beyond which is magic. -- Lord Dunsany — Instagram @grailwoodworks

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lumbering_on

578 posts in 854 days


#32 posted 10-17-2018 08:49 PM



I m pretty sure you can still download the free sketchup so you don t have to work from the awful browser based platform. Try here: https://help.sketchup.com/en/sketchup/downloading-sketchup

- JADobson

Make is still available, but it’s no longer supported. I have the last version (2017), but the problem is eventually older software such as this will die a slow painful death. I also don’t trust Trimble to maintain any sort of compatibility with future versions of Sketchup.

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bilyo

661 posts in 1467 days


#33 posted 10-19-2018 04:17 PM

Does anyone have experience with FreeCad? I would love to see a comparison of it to Fusion. I have used Sketchup Make and can’t say that I have any serious issues with it other than my own limitations. I really don’t use it often enough to stay proficient. My only issue is that because I use Linux as my operating system, I must run Sketchup under Windows 7 within a virtual machine. This works just fine, but does not allow me to use the latest version. FreeCad is free open source software and works on Windows, Mac, and Linux or Unix. I have run it a couple of times and read some of the documentation. It seems very very different than Sketchup, but is parametric like Fuision (not totally sure what that means). I’m not real sure I want to take the time to learn either one.

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Underdog

1305 posts in 2400 days


#34 posted 10-19-2018 04:30 PM

Well the free version Sketchup was fun while it lasted. But Trimble wants to make money with it so the freebie is going away eventually. You can certainly keep the latest free version going for a while. But unsupported software is eventually gonna quit on you.

I’d imagine if you can find a free version of Fusion 360 it won’t be far behind. You’ll pay for it eventually. AutoDesk got hold of ArtCAM and killed it off with exorbitant yearly rates in favor of Fusion (my opinion). They want to make money from their investment.

So I wonder what’s next? Looks to me like Blender is one of the best options as far as free 3D tools. Is it liable to go the way of Sketchup eventually? I’d guess not if it’s open-source.

-- Jim, Georgia, USA

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lumbering_on

578 posts in 854 days


#35 posted 10-19-2018 05:12 PM

Bilyo, I m a great fan of Linux, and have used it for going on 20 years no, but I can t say I m a fan of the lack of software. The good news is that you actually don t have to pay for Windows 10, but it will turn into nag ware for you. You could just set it up in a VM and use it with Fusion or Solidworks.

The term parametric refers to the fact that you don t need to know the exact dimensions to design something. It will do the drawing in relative dimensions, which can be converted to actually measurements when you re finished. It s great if you know what you want you want something to look like, but don t know the exact measurements, or if you re designing a number of similar items. Think about a built-in bookcase. You can design it too look the way you want, and then you would put in the actual measurements in your room, and everything scales. You can then use this model to make one for another room, or even your friend s house without having to redesign it.

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lumbering_on

578 posts in 854 days


#36 posted 10-19-2018 05:13 PM

Dbl post

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lumbering_on

578 posts in 854 days


#37 posted 10-19-2018 05:54 PM



Well the free version Sketchup was fun while it lasted. But Trimble wants to make money with it so the freebie is going away eventually. You can certainly keep the latest free version going for a while. But unsupported software is eventually gonna quit on you.

I d imagine if you can find a free version of Fusion 360 it won t be far behind. You ll pay for it eventually. AutoDesk got hold of ArtCAM and killed it off with exorbitant yearly rates in favor of Fusion (my opinion). They want to make money from their investment.

So I wonder what s next? Looks to me like Blender is one of the best options as far as free 3D tools. Is it liable to go the way of Sketchup eventually? I d guess not if it s open-source.

- Underdog

Somehow this post is depressing me. :(

I hope you are mistaken about Fusion 360, but who knows?

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oldnovice

7475 posts in 3732 days


#38 posted 10-19-2018 06:39 PM

I stopped using Sketchup a very long time ago, have been using the free version of Creo from PTC since 2002, but now I am on the Fusion 360 bandwagon since it is essentially free to hobbyist and students.

I am switching from Creo as I doesn’t look like PTC will add any features while Fusion 360 has more than I will ever use as it includes modeling, sculpting, rendering, animation, and very efficient CAM that is getting very good reviews from many proffesionals.
This has proven to be a somewhat difficult transition from Creo to Fusion 360 but it looks to be worth iit and there are enough tutorials and YouTube videos to keep forging ahead.

-- "I never met a board I didn't like!"

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Andybb

1900 posts in 968 days


#39 posted 10-19-2018 06:54 PM

Don’t have the link handy but you can still get non web Make. At least I could a month or two ago.

-- Andy - Seattle USA

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bandit571

22776 posts in 3047 days


#40 posted 10-19-2018 07:04 PM

Using something called :Single Brain Cell Sketch Up…...and sometimes with a paper “back-up” with rough sizes.

Had Drafting Classes in High School Ind. Arts Class…..68-69 was a LONG time ago…

-- A Planer? I'M the planer, this is what I use

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bilyo

661 posts in 1467 days


#41 posted 10-19-2018 11:33 PM


Bilyo, I m a great fan of Linux, and have used it for going on 20 years no, but I can t say I m a fan of the lack of software. The good news is that you actually don t have to pay for Windows 10, but it will turn into nag ware for you. You could just set it up in a VM and use it with Fusion or Solidworks.

- lumbering_on

I’ve used Linux for not quite 20 years. I have found very very little that I once did in windows that I cant do in Linux; particularly when I include a VM where I can run Windows and any Windows programs if I need to. For just about every windows application, there is an equivalent or better Linux app.

Thanks for the parametric explanation.

So I wonder what s next? Looks to me like Blender is one of the best options as far as free 3D tools. Is it liable to go the way of Sketchup eventually? I d guess not if it s open-source.

- Underdog

Perhaps you missed my comments above about FreeCad. It is for Windows, Mac, and Linux. It is free, parametric, and looks like it does what Fusion does, but I’m not very knowledgeable on the subject.

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lumbering_on

578 posts in 854 days


#42 posted 10-20-2018 12:26 AM


I ve used Linux for not quite 20 years. I have found very very little that I once did in windows that I cant do in Linux; particularly when I include a VM where I can run Windows and any Windows programs if I need to. For just about every windows application, there is an equivalent or better Linux app.

Perhaps you over llooked my comments above about FreeCad. It is for Windows, Mac, and Linux. It is free, parametric, and looks like it does what Fusion does, but I m not very knowledgeable on the subject.

Thanks for the parametric explanation.

- bilyo

Sorry, I should have mentioned that I did look into FreeCad, it was one of the first ones that came up in my search, as well as OnShape. The issue was that FreeCad didn’t seem to have the same user community and resources for learning available. That just may be my read on it, but it is something that swayed me over to Fusion 360. It also didn’t seem to be as intuitive as Fusion when I was looking into them. Again, that could be just me, but it just seemed to be easier for me.

BTW, which Linux are you using? I started with Red Hat – before it became Fedora, but moved to Ubuntu as I hated having to fight with the sound and lack of mp3 support, or support for any proprietary software for that matter. However, Ubuntu just seems to be losing focus these days. :(

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bilyo

661 posts in 1467 days


#43 posted 10-20-2018 02:26 AM

I appreciate the FreeCad info. How long has it been since you checked on it. It appears to have lots of support including detailed documentation, tutorials, and user community. I can’t speak to how good all of that is.
I must confess, I am torn between using CAD and using paper and pencil. While I like having my stuff on the computer for clarity and future reference, I frequently get impatient and frustrated with the time it takes to just get the computer software learned and working. On some simple projects, I will frequently just work with freehand sketches.

I started using Linux with OpenSuse. I briefly tried a couple of other distros, but stuck with OpenSuse for a while. Dont remember why I switched to PClinuxOS, but I did somewhere along the way and have never looked back except for a brief experiment with Mint. The PCLinuxOS motto is “It just works”. And that is true. I am a user, not an techie. I have learned just enough Linux to operate the system for my purposes and get myself into trouble from time to time. When something goes wrong, I depend largely on the user community to help me out. Much like Windows, the GUI lets me do most everything I need to do. AFAIK, It supports just about any type of media out there. An app called Clementine supports MP3. It is installed form the OS’s repository; free of course.

I don’t want to hijack this thread. If you like, PM me and we can discuss further.

View John_'s profile

John_

197 posts in 2070 days


#44 posted 10-20-2018 03:02 AM

Just for info – anyone can get the student version of Solidworks for $40 a year by joining EAA (Experimental Aircraft Association)

https://www.eaa.org/en/eaa/eaa-membership/eaa-member-benefits/solidworks-resource-center/solidworks-videos/eaa-new-member-benefit-from-solidworks

AND

any Veteran can get it for $20

View Woodmaster1's profile

Woodmaster1

1167 posts in 2951 days


#45 posted 10-20-2018 03:14 AM

I use Autodesk Inventor pro, and autocad. I taught drafting then CAD for forty years. I still like using pencil and paper the best. I use Inventor for my 3D modeling. I also have access to a 3D printer where I taught before retiring. It makes nice scale models of projects.

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lumbering_on

578 posts in 854 days


#46 posted 10-20-2018 03:24 AM


I appreciate the FreeCad info. How long has it been since you checked on it. It appears to have lots of support including detailed documentation, tutorials, and user community. I can t speak to how good all of that is.
I must confess, I am torn between using CAD and using paper and pencil. While I like having my stuff on the computer for clarity and future reference, I frequently get impatient and frustrated with the time it takes to just get the computer software learned and working. On some simple projects, I will frequently just work with freehand sketches.

I started using Linux with OpenSuse. I briefly tried a couple of other distros, but stuck with OpenSuse for a while. Dont remember why I switched to PClinuxOS, but I did somewhere along the way and have never looked back except for a brief experiment with Mint. The PCLinuxOS motto is “It just works”. And that is true. I am a user, not an techie. I have learned just enough Linux to operate the system for my purposes and get myself into trouble from time to time. When something goes wrong, I depend largely on the user community to help me out. Much like Windows, the GUI lets me do most everything I need to do. AFAIK, It supports just about any type of media out there. An app called Clementine supports MP3. It is installed form the OS s repository; free of course.

I don t want to hijack this thread. If you like, PM me and we can discuss further.

- bilyo

Thanks for the reply. I don’t want to get too far afield, but my issue with Red Hat/Fedora Core was that you had to go out and find the MP3 player as their philosophy was only to support what was truly open source. I think I’ll have to try out PClinuxOS.

I’ve been looking into the CAD programs for a while, but again, it’s just what I seemed to encounter. FreeCAD does look like a great program, it just seemed like in my searches there was more support for Fusion 360. That could just be the way I went about my searches, and there is nothing to say that I won’t move over to FreeCAD later. I’m just trying out Fusion right now to see how it works out.

I actually do use some quick sketches if I’m not doing anything too intricate, but I’m not very good at drafting. The biggest project I did with a pencil and paper is the built-in desk I use. It’s big and has two pullout shelves, and a drawer, but that’s as complicated as it gets. It’s really just a large bookshelf on top of a few cabinets.

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oldnovice

7475 posts in 3732 days


#47 posted 10-20-2018 04:07 AM

As I stated ealier, I use the free version of Creo as I was trained on the full version while working and obviously moved to the free version for use at home in 2002.

In my opinion, and I my case, Fusion 360 is the only reasonable replacement for Creo especially since it cost’s the same, FREE for hobbyist/students.

Other than Sketchup, I have also had some training on Solidworks, Onshape, and a seminar for IronCad and I still stand by my opinion. I tried Onshape for a number of days but was not that enthrolled enough to take the time to become proficient.

For those that are interested in a non-cloud based application, check out the FREE version of Creo even if it doesn’t have all the features of Sketchup or Solidworks, it still has enough for almost any hobbyist woodworker.

-- "I never met a board I didn't like!"

View bilyo's profile

bilyo

661 posts in 1467 days


#48 posted 10-20-2018 02:26 PM


Thanks for the reply. I don t want to get too far afield, but my issue with Red Hat/Fedora Core was that you had to go out and find the MP3 player as their philosophy was only to support what was truly open source. I think I ll have to try out PClinuxOS.

- lumberingon

PCLinuxOS also discourages the use of proprietary software unless it is in the repository. It has to do with unrecognized “dependencies” I think. I encourage you to give it a try. Just keep in mind that it no longer supports 32 bit, in case you are using an older computer. I think most distros are that way now. One of the big differences is that PCLinuxOS uses a rolling update system rather than a scheduled system. You can go to the repository and update your system, including the kernel, any time you want to.

I ve been looking into the CAD programs for a while, but again, it s just what I seemed to encounter. FreeCAD does look like a great program, it just seemed like in my searches there was more support for Fusion 360. That could just be the way I went about my searches, and there is nothing to say that I won t move over to FreeCAD later. I’m just trying out Fusion right now to see how it works out.

- lumberingon

I’m running Windows 7 Home in a VM. So, I could try Fusion 360 and may do so. I could also try Creo as Oldnovice suggested, but, if I’m reading the system requirements correctly, it requires a higher version of Win 7 like Professional or Enterprise. I would really like to have something that works in Linux. So, I will continue looking into FreeCad.

View xeddog's profile

xeddog

230 posts in 3371 days


#49 posted 10-20-2018 03:23 PM

I have also been running Linux for quite some time. Not sure about 20 years but 10 fer sure. I tried running Fusion 360 in a Virtualbox Windows 10 vm and it just did not work. The big problem was a severe lack of video ram. I think there are hacks to get around it, but those hacks are also fraught with potential problems.

Wayne

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jamsomito

431 posts in 790 days


#50 posted 10-20-2018 05:43 PM

I’m getting really fed up with sketchup. Their move to a web-based version is asinine for anyone doing anything more than a very simple box or just tooling around for fun. Forget serious work on that platform. I have been hanging on to my downloaded version with tooth and nail.

I have training and a few years of experience using both AutoCAD 3D and Pro/E. Pro/E was by far my favorite, but even AutoCAD 3D wasn’t bad. Sketchup just forces you to do things in cumbersome ways because of it’s limited toolset. I’m having a hard time NOT blaming them for this, but I suppose their aim is a more casual userbase. It also is inconsistent at times which drives me crazy.

My favorite part of Pro/E was the parametric functionality. I’ll have to check out Fusion 360, maybe it’ll be closer to my preferred workflow.

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