LumberJocks

All Replies on newbie question #2 - S

  • Advertise with us
View klinkman's profile

newbie question #2 - S

by klinkman
posted 10-14-2018 06:19 PM


18 replies so far

View klinkman's profile

klinkman

43 posts in 357 days


#1 posted 10-14-2018 10:40 PM

Well, the answer is sanding is simpler than I expected. The finish doesn’t penetrate very deeply.

-- Klinkman, hand tool enthusiast

View OSU55's profile

OSU55

2387 posts in 2471 days


#2 posted 10-15-2018 12:04 PM

I dont consider paste wax a finish. Not much protection from anything. A very easy finish – mw poly thinned 1:1, keep the surface wet for 10 min, wipe most of it off. Repeat, as many times as you want. Not as good as a thicker film but will be much better than just wax.

View klinkman's profile

klinkman

43 posts in 357 days


#3 posted 10-15-2018 03:49 PM

Thanks OSU55. While I appreciate wax is not as durable as a poly coat, I consider this piece a bit of fine furniture, not for setting a wet drink glass on. :) Not that it ever won’t get a wet drink, but the idea of a simple to execute, nice looking finish that allows the feel of the wood (over a plastic barrier) was a reasonable trade off over durability for my first real piece of furniture. This will be a low traffic display piece, and yes, I understand it will require occasional refreshing. Appreciate your input and finishing technique, and will certainly try it down the road.

-- Klinkman, hand tool enthusiast

View Rich's profile

Rich

4832 posts in 1071 days


#4 posted 10-15-2018 04:01 PM

To say that wax isn’t a finish flies in the face of every finishing book I have. While being at the bottom of the list for durability and protection, it’s certainly a suitable finish for pieces that will be used like klinkman just described.

-- There's no such thing as a careless electrician

View BroncoBrian's profile

BroncoBrian

875 posts in 2440 days


#5 posted 10-15-2018 04:07 PM

I love using wax as a finish. There are some great waxes available with color in them and they hold up well. I’ve used a dark wax for a sofa table recently and it was one of the most forgiving finishes I’ve used.

Nice work. Amazing how easy a ROS takes your finish off! I 1/8th chamfer on the table would look great.

-- A severed foot is the ultimate stocking stuffer.

View klinkman's profile

klinkman

43 posts in 357 days


#6 posted 10-15-2018 04:24 PM



Nice work. Amazing how easy a ROS takes your finish off! I 1/8th chamfer on the table would look great.

- BroncoBrian

Thanks Brian. 1/8” chamfer—exactly what I did after I got the finish off! Great minds. . . . ;)

-- Klinkman, hand tool enthusiast

View BroncoBrian's profile

BroncoBrian

875 posts in 2440 days


#7 posted 10-15-2018 04:38 PM

Nice. For some reason, the light plays off that angle nicely on Walnut. And Purpleheart. It is a bit more modern.

-- A severed foot is the ultimate stocking stuffer.

View bondogaposis's profile

bondogaposis

5521 posts in 2833 days


#8 posted 10-15-2018 04:45 PM

You found out how un-durable a wax finish is, a drip sweat caused problems, sand back and apply some poly. Table tops see all kinds abuse, you’ll be refinishing that frequently.

-- Bondo Gaposis

View klinkman's profile

klinkman

43 posts in 357 days


#9 posted 10-15-2018 05:17 PM

You found out how un-durable a wax finish is, a drip sweat caused problems.

Sweat hit the stain, before the wax.

-- Klinkman, hand tool enthusiast

View Rich's profile

Rich

4832 posts in 1071 days


#10 posted 10-15-2018 05:24 PM


You found out how un-durable a wax finish is, a drip sweat caused problems.

Sweat hit the stain, before the wax.

- klinkman

Besides, wax is the easiest topcoat to repair. Applying a fresh coat amalgamates with the previous coat creating one coat. There’s no such thing as wax build up.

-- There's no such thing as a careless electrician

View bondogaposis's profile

bondogaposis

5521 posts in 2833 days


#11 posted 10-15-2018 05:34 PM

Besides, wax is the easiest topcoat to repair.

True, but it is not much of a barrier, once the wood underneath swells from contact with water, the repair becomes not so easy.

-- Bondo Gaposis

View BroncoBrian's profile

BroncoBrian

875 posts in 2440 days


#12 posted 10-15-2018 05:35 PM


You found out how un-durable a wax finish is, a drip sweat caused problems.

Sweat hit the stain, before the wax.

- klinkman

Besides, wax is the easiest topcoat to repair. Applying a fresh coat amalgamates with the previous coat creating one coat. There s no such thing as wax build up.

- Rich

He did not read carefully. You can get this stuff at Ace, it works great. Dark/Medium/Clear: https://www.amyhowardhome.com/products/dark-wax

-- A severed foot is the ultimate stocking stuffer.

View Rich's profile

Rich

4832 posts in 1071 days


#13 posted 10-15-2018 06:09 PM


Besides, wax is the easiest topcoat to repair.

True, but it is not much of a barrier, once the wood underneath swells from contact with water, the repair becomes not so easy.

- bondogaposis

Read the thread. Water isn’t an issue in his case.

-- There's no such thing as a careless electrician

View OSU55's profile

OSU55

2387 posts in 2471 days


#14 posted 10-15-2018 06:24 PM



To say that wax isn t a finish flies in the face of every finishing book I have. While being at the bottom of the list for durability and protection, it s certainly a suitable finish for pieces that will be used like klinkman just described.

- Rich


Never said books dont consider it a finish, I stated I dont, since it provides about zero protection. For something that will never be touched, or at the other end of the spectrum some “chic” distressed beat up piece, ok. IMO a sofa table will be touched and have things placed on it, even in a showroom, therefore a different choice should be made. If the op wants to continue dealing with issues like he already has, thats his choice, but it would not be mine.

View bondogaposis's profile

bondogaposis

5521 posts in 2833 days


#15 posted 10-15-2018 06:47 PM


Besides, wax is the easiest topcoat to repair.

True, but it is not much of a barrier, once the wood underneath swells from contact with water, the repair becomes not so easy.

- bondogaposis

Read the thread. Water isn t an issue in his case.

- Rich

Not that it ever won’t get a wet drink,

From the OP, I predict just wax won’t hold up.

-- Bondo Gaposis

View ArtMann's profile

ArtMann

1425 posts in 1298 days


#16 posted 10-15-2018 10:39 PM

I use Johnson’s Paste Wax as part of my finish schedule for keepsake boxes for the same reason Klinkman does. It leaves a silky smooth feel and has a very warm soft luster. I apply it over a fully cured Watco Danish Oil finish. The Watco contains polyurethane for durability as well as oil to bring out the grain of the wood.

View OSU55's profile

OSU55

2387 posts in 2471 days


#17 posted 10-16-2018 05:17 PM



Thanks OSU55. While I appreciate wax is not as durable as a poly coat, I consider this piece a bit of fine furniture, not for setting a wet drink glass on. :) Not that it ever won t get a wet drink, but the idea of a simple to execute, nice looking finish that allows the feel of the wood (over a plastic barrier) was a reasonable trade off over durability for my first real piece of furniture. This will be a low traffic display piece, and yes, I understand it will require occasional refreshing. Appreciate your input and finishing technique, and will certainly try it down the road.

- klinkman


I encourage you to try the close grain finish technique described (always try new finishes & techniques on scrap) You will be surprised by both the look and feel, as well as the improved protection vs wax alone. The thin film does not look “plastic”. Hi gloss thick film finishes of any kind look “plastic”, because most are a form of plastic. Wax can be used over the thin film.

View SMP's profile

SMP

1336 posts in 387 days


#18 posted 10-19-2018 03:03 PM

FWIW, i’ve found that BLO and beeswax has the nice vintage look and feel but better protection than just wax. I do like the ability of wax to bland into the old coats. I’ve used different colors of Briwax to change the color after the fact, even lightening a piece by applying a couple coats of clear.

Have your say...

You must be signed in to reply.

DISCLAIMER: Any posts on LJ are posted by individuals acting in their own right and do not necessarily reflect the views of LJ. LJ will not be held liable for the actions of any user.

Latest Projects | Latest Blog Entries | Latest Forum Topics

HomeRefurbers.com