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View Audie's profile

Tree I.D? Post Oak?

by Audie
posted 10-13-2018 07:43 PM


34 replies so far

View Lazyman's profile

Lazyman

4080 posts in 1922 days


#1 posted 10-13-2018 09:15 PM

Definitely not live oak. Looks a lot like post oak but looks a little like black jack oak as well. Many of the leaves on PO sometimes look almost like a cross, while BJO are more paw shaped. Major branches on PO often come out at nearly right angles. They usually grow on very sandy soil and never heavy clay like live oak can.

Post oak wood is usually fairly rot resistance and while considered a white oak looks more like a red oak color wise. It should be a good wood to use. Those branches that come out at right angles were often used as fence posts.

-- Nathan, TX -- Hire the lazy man. He may not do as much work but that's because he will find a better way.

View TheFridge's profile

TheFridge

10859 posts in 2020 days


#2 posted 10-13-2018 09:23 PM

Pretty sure it’s alder.

-- Shooting down the walls of heartache. Bang bang. I am. The warrior.

View chrisstef's profile

chrisstef

17973 posts in 3541 days


#3 posted 10-13-2018 09:52 PM

Id say post oak based on these pictures from the national audobon society field guide

Fridge doesnt like bacon. Dont trust him.

-- Its not a crack, its a casting imperfection.

View Audie's profile

Audie

17 posts in 396 days


#4 posted 10-13-2018 10:36 PM

Thanks y’all! I definitely think it’s post oak. Now I’m just wondering if it’s worth having milled. I’ve read it could be hard to dry after it’s been milled and although it’s in the white oak family it will not create true white oak lumber that’s so highly sought after.

-- Audie, Texas

View Tony_S's profile (online now)

Tony_S

1027 posts in 3617 days


#5 posted 10-13-2018 11:19 PM



Fridge doesnt like bacon. Dont trust him.

- chrisstef

WTF?.....you shut your filthy mouth…..

-- It is the mark of an educated mind to be able to entertain a thought without accepting it. Aristotle

View Audie's profile

Audie

17 posts in 396 days


#6 posted 10-14-2018 12:28 AM


Id say post oak based on these pictures from the national audobon society field guide

Fridge doesnt like bacon. Dont trust him.

- chrisstef

What book is that? That would be nice to have

-- Audie, Texas

View Lazyman's profile

Lazyman

4080 posts in 1922 days


#7 posted 10-14-2018 12:38 AM

I’ve only used some spalted PO to turn a bowl so I can’t share any direct knowledge but wood database pictures of the wood when quarter sawn look pretty nice.

-- Nathan, TX -- Hire the lazy man. He may not do as much work but that's because he will find a better way.

View Ripper70's profile

Ripper70

1341 posts in 1443 days


#8 posted 10-14-2018 12:42 AM


Fridge doesnt like bacon. Dont trust him.

- chrisstef

WTF?.....you shut your filthy mouth…..

- Tony_S

LOL!

-- "You know, I'm such a great driver, it's incomprehensible that they took my license away." --Vince Ricardo

View chrisstef's profile

chrisstef

17973 posts in 3541 days


#9 posted 10-14-2018 12:46 AM

Its the national audobon society field guide to trees in north america. Its an old college textbook my wife had. A quick peek on amazon appears its now been split up into geographical regions.

Its great. You can ID by bark, leaves, flowers and fruit. Stinks they split it up. Maybe you can find an old back issue.

I know Tony. I know. Its hard to swallow. Come to mama … (opens arms)

-- Its not a crack, its a casting imperfection.

View JohnMcClure's profile

JohnMcClure

777 posts in 1175 days


#10 posted 10-14-2018 01:54 AM

I agree with the post oak assessment. The wood looks great if you can mill it, and if you can’t it has value as firewood for smokers. Apparently the high tannin content gives a good flavor to smoked meat.
In TX, by chance?

-- I'd rather be a hammer than a nail

View Audie's profile

Audie

17 posts in 396 days


#11 posted 10-14-2018 02:25 AM

In TX, by chance?

- JohnMcClure

Yes! Southeast Texas in north Houston.

Fridge doesnt like bacon. Dont trust him.

- chrisstef

Whoa! Enough said

I guess I’m going to have it milled. I have a big excavator on the property so that should help immensely with moving logs around and speeding up the milling process as the sawer that I talked to said he wants an hourly rate. (75 an hour)

-- Audie, Texas

View Lazyman's profile

Lazyman

4080 posts in 1922 days


#12 posted 10-14-2018 03:30 AM

+1 on the PO wood for smoking meat. Much better than mesquite or hickory IMO. If nothing else save some of the smaller branches for the smoker.

BTW, it is pretty common for trees to be used as fence posts, so if there is any chance there was once some fence wire stapled to one of the trees, don’t run that through the mill, unless you cut off the bottom 5 feet or so. You don’t want to buy a new blade for his mill.

-- Nathan, TX -- Hire the lazy man. He may not do as much work but that's because he will find a better way.

View Tony_S's profile (online now)

Tony_S

1027 posts in 3617 days


#13 posted 10-14-2018 12:39 PM



I know Tony. I know. Its hard to swallow. Come to mama … (opens arms)

- chrisstef


Maybe a ‘traumatic’ experience with a pig when he was a younger?....in an Alder forest?

-- It is the mark of an educated mind to be able to entertain a thought without accepting it. Aristotle

View JohnMcClure's profile

JohnMcClure

777 posts in 1175 days


#14 posted 10-14-2018 09:45 PM

Audi, I sent you a PM – I live nearby and would love to come see the sawmilling operation when you get to it. Be happy to help too.

Fridge, what enablers are encouraging you to continue that obnoxious Alder habit?

-- I'd rather be a hammer than a nail

View TheFridge's profile

TheFridge

10859 posts in 2020 days


#15 posted 10-15-2018 01:25 AM

I like my bacon sheet with syrup -

John, I find its like wine and gets better with age. when someone is told to ignore me Before I even post, I am obligated to respond :) and when no one has brought it up I feel obligated to bring it up myself :)

-- Shooting down the walls of heartache. Bang bang. I am. The warrior.

View WDHLT15's profile

WDHLT15

1819 posts in 3010 days


#16 posted 10-15-2018 12:43 PM

Definitely post oak. Leaves will be a bright green on top, and a dull tawny color on the underside. Good quality post oak logs make good quality white oak lumber.

-- Danny Located in Perry, GA. Forester. Wood-Mizer LT40HD35 Sawmill. Nyle L53 Dehumidification Kiln. hamsleyhardwood.com

View shampeon's profile

shampeon

1900 posts in 2718 days


#17 posted 10-15-2018 07:12 PM

For us left coasters, I love this book.

My dad always had a copy on him when we’d go hiking. The tag on the back of mine says, ”$3”. Easily worth that.

-- ian | "You can't stop what's coming. It ain't all waiting on you. That's vanity."

View BroncoBrian's profile

BroncoBrian

875 posts in 2493 days


#18 posted 10-15-2018 07:27 PM

Fridge, what enablers are encouraging you to continue that obnoxious Alder habit?

- JohnMcClure

John – people have been blocked for less. Using those words in sequence… well, you had better be careful where you park your car.

Lived in The Woodlands for years, that does not resemble live oak. Live oak is a scraggly tree a builder plants in front of homes to fulfill their “one-tree” quota.

-- A severed foot is the ultimate stocking stuffer.

View Audie's profile

Audie

17 posts in 396 days


#19 posted 10-15-2018 09:07 PM


Definitely post oak. Leaves will be a bright green on top, and a dull tawny color on the underside. Good quality post oak logs make good quality white oak lumber.

- WDHLT15

Thanks!

I’m thinking I’m going to have it milled into 2’’ thick boards or should I go thicker?

Also, the sawer I talked to said he wants 150.00 set up fee and then 75.00 an hour after that. He said he believes he can do around 1.5 trees an hour. Does this sound fair?

-- Audie, Texas

View BroncoBrian's profile

BroncoBrian

875 posts in 2493 days


#20 posted 10-15-2018 10:15 PM

I think so. Is he covering the cost of blades? If you average less than $100 a tree (the good parts) then you are doing great. Start hunting for stickers! The Home Depot cutoff pile is not a bad place to start. You will need 100’s of them.

-- A severed foot is the ultimate stocking stuffer.

View Audie's profile

Audie

17 posts in 396 days


#21 posted 10-17-2018 01:22 PM


I think so. Is he covering the cost of blades? If you average less than $100 a tree (the good parts) then you are doing great. Start hunting for stickers! The Home Depot cutoff pile is not a bad place to start. You will need 100 s of them.

- BroncoBrian

The sawer never said anything about blades. He just told me his setup and hourly fees. I’m hoping that covers everything.

I’m going to start ripping stickers today. I plan on having the trees milled at the end of the November so I have a little time.

Does it really matter on the thickness of the stickers??? I’m thinking I’ll just make them all 1” thick.

-- Audie, Texas

View Lazyman's profile

Lazyman

4080 posts in 1922 days


#22 posted 10-17-2018 01:30 PM

1” stickers will be fine. The main thing is that they need to be consistent thickness and thick enough to allow air between the boards.

-- Nathan, TX -- Hire the lazy man. He may not do as much work but that's because he will find a better way.

View Audie's profile

Audie

17 posts in 396 days


#23 posted 10-17-2018 02:58 PM



1” stickers will be fine. The main thing is that they need to be consistent thickness and thick enough to allow air between the boards.

- Lazyman

10/4 thanks

-- Audie, Texas

View Lazyman's profile

Lazyman

4080 posts in 1922 days


#24 posted 10-17-2018 03:16 PM

...And probably the most important thing is to make sure that the stickers line up vertically through the stack of boards.

-- Nathan, TX -- Hire the lazy man. He may not do as much work but that's because he will find a better way.

View TheFridge's profile

TheFridge

10859 posts in 2020 days


#25 posted 10-18-2018 01:35 AM



...And probably the most important thing is to make sure that its alder and burn through the stack of boards.
If it’s not.
- Lazyman

-- Shooting down the walls of heartache. Bang bang. I am. The warrior.

View Lazyman's profile

Lazyman

4080 posts in 1922 days


#26 posted 10-18-2018 03:04 AM

Alder would be the best wood to use for making stickers.

-- Nathan, TX -- Hire the lazy man. He may not do as much work but that's because he will find a better way.

View TheFridge's profile

TheFridge

10859 posts in 2020 days


#27 posted 10-18-2018 05:25 AM

...

-- Shooting down the walls of heartache. Bang bang. I am. The warrior.

View WDHLT15's profile

WDHLT15

1819 posts in 3010 days


#28 posted 10-19-2018 12:36 PM

What the sawyer is charging is fair.

Make sure your stack foundations are level. Post oak will crack, check, and honeycomb if dried too fast. For this species, 3/4” thick stickers are better than 1” because the thinner sticker will slow the drying more. Your stacks should be under an open sided shed or be covered. Do not put them in the middle of a large open area to prevent to much exposure to the wind which can lead to drying too fast, especially in low humidity conditions.

-- Danny Located in Perry, GA. Forester. Wood-Mizer LT40HD35 Sawmill. Nyle L53 Dehumidification Kiln. hamsleyhardwood.com

View Audie's profile

Audie

17 posts in 396 days


#29 posted 10-19-2018 04:31 PM


What the sawyer is charging is fair.

Make sure your stack foundations are level. Post oak will crack, check, and honeycomb if dried too fast. For this species, 3/4” thick stickers are better than 1” because the thinner sticker will slow the drying more. Your stacks should be under an open sided shed or be covered. Do not put them in the middle of a large open area to prevent to much exposure to the wind which can lead to drying too fast, especially in low humidity conditions.

- WDHLT15

I’m planing on stacking them and drying them in my shop with just a fan blowing on them and after a few months ( probably 8 months or once it gets down to around 12%) adding a humidifier. Is this a good idea or bad?

The shop is not air conditioned. I’m in Houston Tx and the humidity is high.

-- Audie, Texas

View Audie's profile

Audie

17 posts in 396 days


#30 posted 10-19-2018 06:12 PM

Found the perfect stickers! Gonna save me a lot of time. Home Depot has furring strips that are 1” x 2” x 8’ (actual size .75×1.5×8’ )

-- Audie, Texas

View JohnMcClure's profile

JohnMcClure

777 posts in 1175 days


#31 posted 10-19-2018 08:32 PM

Those furring strips are what I use to dry lumber as well.
Stacked in the garage with a fan is probably fine, adding the dehum after a bit may be a good idea but may not be necessary. However without the dehum or a heater, plan on waiting a year before building fine furniture.

A solar kiln is fun to build, but adds $$ and PITA to your project. Advantage is it allows faster drying.

-- I'd rather be a hammer than a nail

View Lazyman's profile

Lazyman

4080 posts in 1922 days


#32 posted 10-20-2018 03:05 AM

I don’t think you want to have a fan blowing on it. Oaks and I think especially white oaks may suffer case hardening if they dry too fast so it is better to let them dry a little more slowly. This is probably at least part of the reason why Danny recommended the 3/4” stickers instead of the 1”. The high humidity may actually be a good thing as it will slow down the drying process which may help prevent case hardening.

-- Nathan, TX -- Hire the lazy man. He may not do as much work but that's because he will find a better way.

View Audie's profile

Audie

17 posts in 396 days


#33 posted 10-20-2018 12:18 PM



I don’t think you want to have a fan blowing on it. Oaks and I think especially white oaks may suffer case hardening if they dry too fast so it is better to let them dry a little more slowly. This is probably at least part of the reason why Danny recommended the 3/4” stickers instead of the 1”. The high humidity may actually be a good thing as it will slow down the drying process which may help prevent case hardening.

- Lazyman

Thanks! After further research I think you’re right about the fan and slowing down the process of drying when using Oak.

I will probably still use a fan but it won’t be pointed anywhere in the direction of the stacks. It will just be to circulate air on a low setting.

I’m still debating on whether to stack a bunch of cinder blocks on top of the stacks or to just use straps and every week or so tighten them a little to account for the shrinkage.

Thanks everyone! Y’all have been extremely helpful

-- Audie, Texas

View WDHLT15's profile

WDHLT15

1819 posts in 3010 days


#34 posted 10-21-2018 04:40 AM


I will probably still use a fan but it won’t be pointed anywhere in the direction of the stacks. It will just be to circulate air on a low setting.

This is a good plan with the fan not blowing directly on the stack. You are going to have to let the evaporating moisture get out of your shop, so maybe leave a window open or you can run a dehumidifier but set it for about 60% humidity until your wood reaches 25% moisture content or less. Then you can drop the humidity setting down to 30% and let er rip. It usually takes about 8 months for my white oak lumber (4/4) to air dry (under an open shed) before it gets to 20% or below.

-- Danny Located in Perry, GA. Forester. Wood-Mizer LT40HD35 Sawmill. Nyle L53 Dehumidification Kiln. hamsleyhardwood.com

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