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All Replies on how can i minimize cracking in small logs of black walnut that was milled?

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View eihabk's profile

how can i minimize cracking in small logs of black walnut that was milled?

by eihabk
posted 10-13-2018 02:15 PM


8 replies so far

View bondogaposis's profile

bondogaposis

5570 posts in 2915 days


#1 posted 10-13-2018 02:24 PM

Seal the ends, aim for slow drying.

-- Bondo Gaposis

View eihabk's profile

eihabk

4 posts in 425 days


#2 posted 10-13-2018 04:04 PM

Nice, would it dry slower if i brought the slabs inside? I’m in Toronto and the weather is getting chilly here

View lumbering_on's profile

lumbering_on

578 posts in 1054 days


#3 posted 10-13-2018 04:39 PM



Nice, would it dry slower if i brought the slabs inside? I m in Toronto and the weather is getting chilly here

- eihabk

Toronto is tropical compared to Ottawa. :(

If you have the room, you can make a dehumidifier kiln.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LF8vCwsHp1g&t=1s

View BattleRidge's profile

BattleRidge

121 posts in 780 days


#4 posted 10-13-2018 09:36 PM

The endgrain part of the boards will dry quicker than the sides / inner areas and the difference is what causes the splitting. To minimize, the best method is to treat the ends of the boards (as soon as possible) with a coating which will seal the endgrain and allow for more even drying of the wood (effectively slowing down the swift localized drying of the ends).

A product like Anchorseal (Classic formula, not ’ Anchorseal 2’) would be my suggestion. I’m not sure how much wood you may eventually come across in the future, or the cost effectiveness of a small quantity of wood, but believe the product will last for quite some time if protected from repeated freeze / thaw cycles. You can buy it direct from the manufacturer.

While I don’t believe delivery should take very long, taking some type of precautionary measure (such as dipping the ends into shallow plate of water occasionally or frequently??) to prevent drying in the meantime might hold some possibilities in protecting the boards until coating – though this is a guess and I haven’t actually done it. You will see some lumber yards keeping their stock of logs wet by spraying with water to limit splitting and such. I wouldn’t recommend an over-use of water though, and would avoid doing getting much (if any) on the sides of the boards that have already been cut – just using some water on the end. Some people have used latex paint, melted wax and other products with varying results – and varying degrees of effects to saw blades, planers and jointers during processing. I don’t believe that Anchorseal causes any problems in future milling activities.

Your wood is quite pretty and I hope you are able to create some great projects from it.

http://uccoatings.com/products/anchorseal/

View Richard's profile

Richard

11307 posts in 3597 days


#5 posted 10-13-2018 09:38 PM



The endgrain part of the boards will dry quicker than the sides / inner areas and the difference is what causes the splitting. To minimize, the best method is to treat the ends of the boards (as soon as possible) with a coating which will seal the endgrain and allow for more even drying of the wood (effectively slowing down the swift localized drying of the ends).

A product like Anchorseal (Classic formula, not Anchorseal 2 ) would be my suggestion. I m not sure how much wood you may eventually come across in the future, or the cost effectiveness of a small quantity of wood, but believe the product will last for quite some time if protected from repeated freeze / thaw cycles. You can buy it direct from the manufacturer.

While I don t believe delivery should take very long, taking some type of precautionary measure (such as dipping the ends into shallow plate of water occasionally or frequently??) to prevent drying in the meantime might hold some possibilities in protecting the boards until coating – though this is a guess and I haven t actually done it. You will see some lumber yards keeping their stock of logs wet by spraying with water to limit splitting and such. I wouldn t recommend an over-use of water though, and would avoid doing getting much (if any) on the sides of the boards that have already been cut – just using some water on the end. Some people have used latex paint, melted wax and other products with varying results – and varying degrees of effects to saw blades, planers and jointers during processing. I don t believe that Anchorseal causes any problems in future milling activities.

Your wood is quite pretty and I hope you are able to create some great projects from it.

http://uccoatings.com/products/anchorseal/

- BattleRidge

I Agree!

-- Richard (Ontario, CANADA)

View eihabk's profile

eihabk

4 posts in 425 days


#6 posted 10-13-2018 10:35 PM

Thanks for the responses guys. I don’t think I mill enough to justify buying anchor seal. In the picture you can see I put on 3 coats so far of latex paint. Should I go for four?

And wanted to get opinions if I should bother milling logs this small next time? These were going to be turnt into firewood but i rescued them lol

View firefighterontheside's profile

firefighterontheside

20695 posts in 2420 days


#7 posted 10-13-2018 11:58 PM

Depends on what you want to do with them. Pieces that short may not go thru a planer very well. Could be good for cutting boards and such. The latex is better than nothing and I think 3 coats is gonna be fine. Walnut behaves pretty well when drying in general. It will dry faster indoors unless you’re in an arid climate.

-- Bill M. "People change, walnut doesn't" by Gene.

View eihabk's profile

eihabk

4 posts in 425 days


#8 posted 10-14-2018 02:03 PM

Thank you!

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