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View aamk's profile

Flattening a warped live edge?

by aamk
posted 10-12-2018 02:32 AM


13 replies so far

View Steve's profile

Steve

1184 posts in 915 days


#1 posted 10-12-2018 03:15 AM

what was the moisture content on the piece after you milled it?

View Aj2's profile

Aj2

2138 posts in 2131 days


#2 posted 10-12-2018 03:40 AM

According to the experts finishing both sides is not necessary to prevent cupping. There’s lots of reasons why wood will change its shape when it’s brought in doors.
The only way I know to take a cup out of a board is rip it in half flatin one face then send it through the planer. We do this as many times as needed and sneak up to its final thickness.
Trying to force the wood flat is futile.

-- Aj

View lumbering_on's profile

lumbering_on

578 posts in 823 days


#3 posted 10-12-2018 03:56 AM

The cupping upwards actually means the bottom has a higher moisture content than the bottom, which causes the wood to curl towards the dry side as it is more taut.

I’m not sure if you can flatten it out for good, but your best bet would be to remove the table top, and see if you can dry the bottom out by laying it on it top for a while, and try putting a bit of weight on it using stickers. It’s worth a try, but the reality is that it sounds like the MC was too high when the table was put together.

You could also try using this dehumidifier kiln :https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LF8vCwsHp1g

I have seen smaller boards, particularly flooring flatten out, but these are far from the live edge you would have used.

View aamk's profile

aamk

6 posts in 520 days


#4 posted 10-12-2018 08:49 AM

I found this video https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=wEy4zJ0cizM there seems to be hope and he gave a great explanation of what happened. Sounds like oil finish on one side and not the other was the culprit. I’m going to wet the cupped finished side turn it upside down heat the table put an air mover across the unfinished side see if I get any progress and then finish the bottom. The table was beautiful hopefully I can get it flat again.

View lumbering_on's profile

lumbering_on

578 posts in 823 days


#5 posted 10-12-2018 12:16 PM



I found this video https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=wEy4zJ0cizM there seems to be hope and he gave a great explanation of what happened. Sounds like oil finish on one side and not the other was the culprit. I’m going to wet the cupped finished side turn it upside down heat the table put an air mover across the unfinished side see if I get any progress and then finish the bottom. The table was beautiful hopefully I can get it flat again.

...

- aamk

It’s just Charles Neil – what does he know? ;)

Yes this is sarcasm – before anyone takes this the wrong way.

View Aj2's profile

Aj2

2138 posts in 2131 days


#6 posted 10-12-2018 01:38 PM

What the neck are those four patches of wood going across the grain. Something looks fishy ~>

-- Aj

View HokieKen's profile

HokieKen

8959 posts in 1471 days


#7 posted 10-12-2018 03:18 PM



What the neck are those four patches of wood going across the grain. Something looks fishy ~>

- Aj2

I’m guessing they were used to aid in alignment when the top was glued up. Maybe? I was wondering the same thing.

-- Kenny, SW VA, Go Hokies!!!

View Steve's profile

Steve

1184 posts in 915 days


#8 posted 10-12-2018 03:21 PM

Why isn’t the person who built the table fixing it?

View aamk's profile

aamk

6 posts in 520 days


#9 posted 10-12-2018 08:11 PM

He thought those would keep it from bowing I didn’t think it would work I expected the metal would but it pulled the bolts out anyway. He offered to try but I will see. How far I can get with it.

View lumbering_on's profile

lumbering_on

578 posts in 823 days


#10 posted 10-12-2018 08:32 PM



He thought those would keep it from bowing I didn’t think it would work I expected the metal would but it pulled the bolts out anyway. He offered to try but I will see. How far I can get with it.

- aamk

I’ve seen maple rip out 3” #10 screws, so it’s not surprising the bolts didn’t help.

View JayT's profile

JayT

6132 posts in 2544 days


#11 posted 10-12-2018 10:08 PM

If you paid someone to do that table top, get your money back and don’t ever have them build anything for you again. No one that understands wood movement would ever have done those recessed cross grain pieces. Even if the table didn’t cup, it would have split in short order due to seasonal changes. What a waste of a couple nice pieces of bookmatched pecan.

There’s lots more to being a good woodworker than the ability to glue and screw pieces of lumber together.

-- In theory, there is no difference between theory and practice. In practice, there is.

View aamk's profile

aamk

6 posts in 520 days


#12 posted 10-12-2018 11:24 PM

There was a lot more than just the top he built the base got everything squared I knew it was his first live edge attempt and he planned the wood with the router and sled. I will mil some more this winter and try to find a kiln and go that route. I paid 400 for the building of the entire table so it was far from getting ripped off and I really don’t think the boards on the bottom caused it I believe it was from only finishing the top.

View Shamb3's profile

Shamb3

39 posts in 514 days


#13 posted 10-13-2018 03:41 AM


There was a lot more than just the top he built the base got everything squared I knew it was his first live edge attempt and he planned the wood with the router and sled. I will mil some more this winter and try to find a kiln and go that route. I paid 400 for the building of the entire table so it was far from getting ripped off and I really don’t think the boards on the bottom caused it I believe it was from only finishing the top.

- aamk

In the video you posted, he said just sanding one side of a piece of plywood could lead to warping. Imagine what routing not kiln dried lumber could do.

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