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View AlaskaGuy's profile

Help me pick out spokeshaves

by AlaskaGuy
posted 10-10-2018 06:18 PM


23 replies so far

View pottz's profile

pottz

5945 posts in 1462 days


#1 posted 10-10-2018 06:39 PM

just bought a set of the veritas when i did my maloof rocker,very well made high quality spokesahaves,i would highly recommend these.

-- sawdust the bigger the pile the bigger my smile-larry,so cal.

View AlaskaGuy's profile

AlaskaGuy

5338 posts in 2786 days


#2 posted 10-10-2018 06:50 PM



just bought a set of the veritas when i did my maloof rocker,very well made high quality spokesahaves,i would highly recommend these.

- pottz

Thanks for the recommendation. Those are the ones I’ve been eyeballing. Looking at you beautifully done chair tell tells me they must work well in the right hands.

-- Alaskan's for Global warming!

View pottz's profile

pottz

5945 posts in 1462 days


#3 posted 10-10-2018 06:59 PM


just bought a set of the veritas when i did my maloof rocker,very well made high quality spokesahaves,i would highly recommend these.

- pottz
Thanks for the recommendation. Those are the ones I ve been eyeballing. Looking at you beautifully done chair tell tells me they must work well in the right hands.

- AlaskaGuy

yeah i bought the 3 piece set in the tool roll,not cheap but the quality justifies it.plus my son will still be using those in 50 years.also thank you for the compliment i appreciate that.

-- sawdust the bigger the pile the bigger my smile-larry,so cal.

View AlaskaGuy's profile

AlaskaGuy

5338 posts in 2786 days


#4 posted 10-10-2018 07:14 PM


just bought a set of the veritas when i did my maloof rocker,very well made high quality spokesahaves,i would highly recommend these.

- pottz
Thanks for the recommendation. Those are the ones I ve been eyeballing. Looking at you beautifully done chair tell tells me they must work well in the right hands.

- AlaskaGuy

yeah i bought the 3 piece set in the tool roll,not cheap but the quality justifies it.plus my son will still be using those in 50 years.also thank you for the compliment i appreciate that.

- pottz

Did you use all 3 shaves on your chair. At this point I don’t know that I need the round one.

-- Alaskan's for Global warming!

View Ocelot's profile

Ocelot

2323 posts in 3115 days


#5 posted 10-10-2018 07:18 PM

If you don’t have any spokeshaves, I would buy an old Stanley No. 51 or 151 to try. After cleaning and tune-up, it might be all you need. One of my No. 51’s has a very tight mouth – feels good in the hands too.

Not hard to get one for $25 shipped.

The 151’s will be a bit more, but are more easy to adjust.

I like old tools.

-Paul

View pottz's profile

pottz

5945 posts in 1462 days


#6 posted 10-10-2018 07:18 PM


just bought a set of the veritas when i did my maloof rocker,very well made high quality spokesahaves,i would highly recommend these.

- pottz
Thanks for the recommendation. Those are the ones I ve been eyeballing. Looking at you beautifully done chair tell tells me they must work well in the right hands.

- AlaskaGuy

yeah i bought the 3 piece set in the tool roll,not cheap but the quality justifies it.plus my son will still be using those in 50 years.also thank you for the compliment i appreciate that.

- pottz
Did you use all 3 shaves on your chair. At this point I don t know that I need the round one.

- AlaskaGuy

glad you asked,i thought with all the round spindles and legs i would use it the most,it was the least used and if i did it again id probably not buy the rounded one,but that depends on what your needs are ag.

-- sawdust the bigger the pile the bigger my smile-larry,so cal.

View Andre's profile

Andre

2744 posts in 2283 days


#7 posted 10-10-2018 08:03 PM

My goto is the Brass LNs with some Hock irons in them, thinking about getting a #51 Seldom if ever need that size?

-- Lifting one end of the plank.

View DrDirt's profile

DrDirt

4592 posts in 4219 days


#8 posted 10-10-2018 08:05 PM

I only have the flat bottom, from Lee Valley. I like it…have no complaints, but don’t know that it is better or worse than som of the others, it is just what I chose, and learned to keep sharp and set, so it feels “right” to me.

-- “The two most important days in your life are the day you are born and the day you find out why.” Mark Twain

View PPK's profile

PPK

1502 posts in 1287 days


#9 posted 10-10-2018 09:04 PM

Lee Valley(Veritas) or Lie Neilsen. Both are top notch.
I can never get stanleys to stop chattering. But the two aforementioned dont chatter. I like the Veritas for the easy adjustment, and the Lie Neilsen for the heft and absolutely NO chatter.

-- Pete

View AlaskaGuy's profile

AlaskaGuy

5338 posts in 2786 days


#10 posted 10-10-2018 09:28 PM


If you don t have any spokeshaves, I would buy an old or 151 to try. After cleaning and tune-up, it might be all you need. One of my No. 51 s has a very tight mouth – feels good in the hands too.

Not hard to get one for $25 shipped.

The 151 s will be a bit more, but are more easy to adjust.

I like old tools.

-Paul

- Ocelot


Of course I’ve been researching spoke saves at other places than LJ. I’ve seen the Stanley No. 51 mentions several time. I may get one of the 51’s to go along with what ever else I get. Thanks for you input.

-- Alaskan's for Global warming!

View jdh122's profile

jdh122

1093 posts in 3295 days


#11 posted 10-10-2018 10:06 PM

I have all three from Veritas. While I love the flat and convex bottom ones, I would not buy the round one again. Fiddly to use and especially to sharpen, and not that much more convenient than simply removing small facets with the regular spokeshave.

-- Jeremy, in the Acadian forests

View Andre's profile

Andre

2744 posts in 2283 days


#12 posted 10-10-2018 10:20 PM


Veritas also sells a nice little Cast round spokeshave but PMV-11 iron not really needed.
I love how easy this style is to set up and adjust! Very simple if you know how:)
Forgot to mention, IMHO stay away from the Veritas Low Angle!

-- Lifting one end of the plank.

View therealSteveN's profile

therealSteveN

3593 posts in 1051 days


#13 posted 10-10-2018 10:34 PM

Depends on the work to be done. There is a mile of difference between a LN mini, and a 51. Both are spokeshaves, but with decidedly different attributes that can/will make one perfect, and the other a PIA to use based on what you are trying to do. If you start using them, and like what they can do, just start wherever you can afford to jump in, cause you’ll end up collecting them all.

If you have NONE right now, then I’ll agree with the poster who suggested a Stanley 51 to start out. Low cost of entry, coupled with a design/shape they all use as their basis. After using it you will be better able to appreciate the differences between them all, simply because you’ll have user input.

I asked an old fart I know well when I started getting into spokeshaves what the difference was between LN, LV, and back then they didn’t have most of what either has now, and a Stanley. He just mused a second, and said nutz n bolts…....... Waiting for more I just stood there looking at him…..... Finally he said NUTZ and BOLTS you know the stuff what adjusts them…...

-- Think safe, be safe

View TungOil's profile

TungOil

1319 posts in 972 days


#14 posted 10-11-2018 02:27 AM

I have the LN shaves. I was concerned about the lack of adjusting screws before I bought them, but I happened to be at Marc Adams school the same weekend Tom was there teaching a hand tool class. After he showed me how easy it is to set blade depth I immediately bought the set. They work like a dream, highly recommended. But I think you cannot go,wrong with either the LN or veritas.

I used the Stanley 151 at Marc Adams and found it frusating to adjust and chattered too much for my tastes.

-- The optimist says "the glass is half full". The pessimist says "the glass is half empty". The engineer says "the glass is twice as big as it needs to be"

View planecurious's profile

planecurious

8 posts in 340 days


#15 posted 10-11-2018 04:22 AM

Hello, I’m a long time lurker and have hum and hawed over joining for a while but this question made me do it. I do not have a lot of experience but have been slowly assembling a collection of (hopefully) good quality tools. Here is my experience

I have played with most of the LV ones in the local store and ended up getting woodjoy spokeshaves; they may be worth a look for you. I have a flat and a circular one and they are amazing.

I’m convinced the Veritas low-angle spokeshave is in the catalogue as an objective lesson in not designing bad tools ;-P

View fly2low's profile

fly2low

88 posts in 574 days


#16 posted 10-11-2018 07:11 AM

I have the Clifton spokeshaves. They work for me.
https://www.toolsforworkingwood.com/store/dept/TPSP/item/EE-SH6356.XX

-- Rich Gig Harbor, WA

View KYtoolsmith's profile

KYtoolsmith

83 posts in 337 days


#17 posted 10-16-2018 01:07 AM

I have managed to accumulate nearly every model of Stanley spoke shave and some others, including two Boggs design spokeshaves made by Lie Nielsen. I love the LN quality and feel, but I often find the Stanley 53 or 54 with the adjustable throat easier to use for fine work. As to chatter on Stanley shaves, my experience is that most need to be set for a fine shaving. They are not the sort that can be used to hog off large amounts of wood. Additionally, there is quite a difference based on handle height… I find fewer problems with the low handled versions of Stanley shaves such as the 152 instead of the 151, or the 52 instead of the 51.

$.02 from KY.

-- "Good enough" is just another way of saying "it could be better"...

View AlaskaGuy's profile

AlaskaGuy

5338 posts in 2786 days


#18 posted 10-16-2018 02:06 AM



I have managed to accumulate nearly every model of Stanley spoke shave and some others, including two Boggs design spokeshaves made by Lie Nielsen. I love the LN quality and feel, but I often find the Stanley 53 or 54 with the adjustable throat easier to use for fine work. As to chatter on Stanley shaves, my experience is that most need to be set for a fine shaving. They are not the sort that can be used to hog off large amounts of wood. Additionally, there is quite a difference based on handle height… I find fewer problems with the low handled versions of Stanley shaves such as the 152 instead of the 151, or the 52 instead of the 51.

$.02 from KY.

- KYtoolsmith


Thanks for sharing what works for you.

-- Alaskan's for Global warming!

View TheFridge's profile

TheFridge

10859 posts in 1963 days


#19 posted 10-16-2018 02:16 AM

Had a record 151. It was ok. Mouth was too big. I never knew how a spokeshave was supposed to work until I watched a doucette and Wolfe video on build a claw foot highboy.

I have the veritas flat and curved. They work great. Mouth can be a little tight at times but it’s worth every penny.

I wouldn’t worry about the one for chairs and rounding stock unless you have a project in mind.

-- Shooting down the walls of heartache. Bang bang. I am. The warrior.

View OiBowyer's profile

OiBowyer

21 posts in 469 days


#20 posted 10-16-2018 02:51 AM

I mostly use spoke shaves for carving archery notes from sticks and boards. I have made a few spokes as well. I used a couple of old borrowed spoke shaves. They were kind of a pain so I bought a new Stanley 151. I have never seen a need to buy another. If you set up\tune up your tool well, and take your time using it you will get good results with nearly anything.
I should say that I am a tool minimalist. I have more time than money right now. So I learn to use the cheap stuff well.
I looked in my toolbox to see what kind of spoke shave that I have, and I found one that I forgot about. My first spoke shave was a piece of Ash with a blade screwed to it. There are no adjustments so you can only take the blade off to sharpen it. It taught me a lot about shaving wood.
Sure more expensive and fancy tools are nice but I have learned a lot by using bottom end tools when I start thinking about a new line. My advice is usually to start out cheap and upgrade when the cheap stuff won’t work anymore or you would save enough time to justify the expense.

-- Matt Bielenberg- turning student https://www.etsy.com/shop/Turning4SchoolMoney?ref=search_shop_redirect https://www.facebook.com/Turning-4-School-Money-213112446187330/?modal=admin_todo_tour

View TheFridge's profile

TheFridge

10859 posts in 1963 days


#21 posted 10-16-2018 04:58 AM

I didn’t know we weren’t buddies. I remedied that. We are now brothers in alder.

-- Shooting down the walls of heartache. Bang bang. I am. The warrior.

View Lazyman's profile

Lazyman

3871 posts in 1865 days


#22 posted 10-16-2018 01:30 PM

Now I am going to have to dig up that spokeshave I bought at a garage sale for $5 last year and see if it is any good. It has no markings but based upon the color and design, it might be a Kunz 151? Anyone used one of those?

-- Nathan, TX -- Hire the lazy man. He may not do as much work but that's because he will find a better way.

View waho6o9's profile

waho6o9

8746 posts in 3054 days


#23 posted 10-16-2018 01:45 PM

http://www.hocktools.com/products/kits.html

You can make a flat one with a Hock spokeshave kit, it’s a fun build as well.

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