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View fiddlebanshee's profile

Will woodglue go bad?

by fiddlebanshee
posted 10-10-2018 05:10 PM


29 replies so far

View bondogaposis's profile

bondogaposis

5556 posts in 2891 days


#1 posted 10-10-2018 05:26 PM

Probably no good, you can easily tell if it “chalks” when it dries.

-- Bondo Gaposis

View Rich's profile

Rich

5001 posts in 1129 days


#2 posted 10-10-2018 05:26 PM

Their site says it’s freeze/thaw stable.

http://titebond.com/product/glues/2ef3e95d-48d2-43bc-8e1b-217a38930fa2 (bottom of the page)

Probably safer to toss it though. It’s cheap insurance. You sure don’t want to have a project fall apart.

View LittleShaver's profile

LittleShaver

597 posts in 1159 days


#3 posted 10-10-2018 05:31 PM

When in doubt, throw it out.

-- Sawdust Maker

View pottz's profile

pottz

6705 posts in 1524 days


#4 posted 10-10-2018 06:42 PM



When in doubt, throw it out.

- LittleShaver

ditto,not worth the chance.

-- sawdust the bigger the pile the bigger my smile-larry,so cal.

View waho6o9's profile

waho6o9

8786 posts in 3117 days


#5 posted 10-10-2018 06:53 PM

There’s a date code on there as well.

Excellent advice above, throw it out.

View Fred Hargis's profile

Fred Hargis

5802 posts in 3033 days


#6 posted 10-10-2018 07:11 PM

The last time i read Fanklin’s freeze warning, they suggested it was safe through 5 freeze/thaw cycles. Your may ave been through more than that. I’d probably toss it, but you could test it and see what happens.

-- Our village hasn't lost it's idiot, he was elected to congress.

View lumbering_on's profile

lumbering_on

578 posts in 1030 days


#7 posted 10-10-2018 07:23 PM

Glue up some test wood and see what happens. If nothing else, you’ll get to take some frustration out by bashing some wood around.

View DrDirt's profile

DrDirt

4592 posts in 4282 days


#8 posted 10-10-2018 08:08 PM

not worth messing with. Rather spend an additional 8 bucks for a 16 ounces of glue, than have a joint fail.

-- “The two most important days in your life are the day you are born and the day you find out why.” Mark Twain

View MrRon's profile

MrRon

5770 posts in 3783 days


#9 posted 10-10-2018 09:21 PM

Take your glue into the house when freezing is eminent. A good way is to store glue in a styrofoam box and keep it up off the ground.

View 000's profile

000

2859 posts in 1439 days


#10 posted 10-10-2018 10:01 PM

If it doesn’t seem too thick, use it.
Test may be in order, but I think it’s fine if it hasn’t thickened.
Give it a good stir first.

If your building a heirloom, throw it out.

View woodbutcherbynight's profile

woodbutcherbynight

5974 posts in 2949 days


#11 posted 10-11-2018 12:52 AM


If your building a heirloom, throw it out.

- jbay

+1 better safe than full of regret. Just saying. LOL

-- Live to tell the stories, they sound better that way.

View Gerald Thompson's profile

Gerald Thompson

1224 posts in 2774 days


#12 posted 10-11-2018 01:07 AM

I can’t find the out date codes.

-- Jerry

View PCDub's profile

PCDub

152 posts in 784 days


#13 posted 10-11-2018 01:20 AM

A friend who bought a new house last year found a nearly full bottle of TB II in the garage this spring. It was very thick; I thinned it with water and stirred it thoroughly—there was something we HAD to glue, so we did… worked fine!
Not sure I’d use it on an heirloom, as others have said, but it does work!

View waho6o9's profile

waho6o9

8786 posts in 3117 days


#14 posted 10-11-2018 01:47 AM

Titebond’s new website doesn’t have the date code explanation any more.

Technical Support Team at 1-800-347-4583, Monday – Friday, 8 a.m. – 5:00 p.m. EST.

The A means it was made in America and I’m not sure how to decipher the number part of the date code
on the TB III bottle.

View Lazyman's profile

Lazyman

4089 posts in 1927 days


#15 posted 10-11-2018 04:43 AM

4 is the last digit of the year so 2014 (I think they used a different code back in 2004)
06 is month
23 is day.

Personally, I don’t buy Titebond glue anymore, i have had had 3 bottles now go bad with code dates under 2 years old. One bottle had only been used once but the last time I tried to use it, it had started to solidify in the sealed bottle. Only time I’ve ever had a glue joint fail was with TB3 with a code date less than a year old. On the other hand I have a gallon jug of Elmer’s carpenter glue that is still half full that I bought in 2014 that stills works just fine, though I am starting to think it might be time to throw it out.

-- Nathan, TX -- Hire the lazy man. He may not do as much work but that's because he will find a better way.

View Rich's profile

Rich

5001 posts in 1129 days


#16 posted 10-11-2018 04:47 AM


Personally, I don’t buy Titebond glue anymore

- Lazyman

But, who else makes fluorescent glue? I use it on every project to prevent problems when I apply finish.

http://lumberjocks.com/RichTaylor/blog/119665

View waho6o9's profile

waho6o9

8786 posts in 3117 days


#17 posted 10-11-2018 01:32 PM

Thanks Lazyman!

View EarlS's profile

EarlS

3214 posts in 2888 days


#18 posted 10-11-2018 01:37 PM

I use the mantra “when in doubt throw it out” for finishes as well as glue. Saving a couple bucks is just not worth the risk of messing up a project.

-- Earl "I'm a pessamist - generally that increases the chance that things will turn out better than expected"

View GR8HUNTER's profile

GR8HUNTER

6581 posts in 1252 days


#19 posted 10-11-2018 01:41 PM



If it doesn t seem too thick, use it.
Test may be in order, but I think it s fine if it hasn t thickened.
Give it a good stir first.

If your building a heirloom, throw it out.

- jbay


+1 DITTO ^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^ :<))

-- Tony---- Reinholds,Pa.------ REMEMBER TO ALWAYS HAVE FUN

View Lazyman's profile

Lazyman

4089 posts in 1927 days


#20 posted 10-11-2018 03:23 PM

I was thinking about the suggestion about adding water to the glue if it has started to thicken. While it might make it usable I wonder if that is really a good idea. If it is thickening because water has evaporated then it has started to set and I doubt you’ll be reversing anything. If the bottle was sealed for all but the few minutes it was open to apply it a few times as mine did then water loss is unlikely and there may be some sort of chemical reaction happening which is probably why it has a code date. Just a thought.

-- Nathan, TX -- Hire the lazy man. He may not do as much work but that's because he will find a better way.

View pottz's profile

pottz

6705 posts in 1524 days


#21 posted 10-11-2018 03:27 PM



I was thinking about the suggestion about adding water to the glue if it has started to thicken. While it might make it usable I wonder if that is really a good idea. If it is thickening because water has evaporated then it has started to set and I doubt you ll be reversing anything. If the bottle was sealed for all but the few minutes it was open to apply it a few times as mine did then water loss is unlikely and there may be some sort of chemical reaction happening which is probably why it has a code date. Just a thought.

- Lazyman


i think your right from what ive heard adding water to glue is not a good idea and will weaken the bond.

-- sawdust the bigger the pile the bigger my smile-larry,so cal.

View Rich's profile

Rich

5001 posts in 1129 days


#22 posted 10-11-2018 03:42 PM


i think your right from what ive heard adding water to glue is not a good idea and will weaken the bond.

- pottz

I don’t know why this person didn’t bother to check the manufacturer’s web site before posting incorrect information. Must be too much work.

According to Titebond:

Can Titebond Wood Glues be thinned?
Most of our water-based wood glues can be thinned with water up to 5% by weight or by volume. Adding more than 5% water to our glues will decrease the bond strength. Titebond Liquid Hide Glue is thinned by gently heating the bottle in a pan of warm water. Titebond Polyurethane Glue may only be thinned by placing the bottle into a pan of warm water.

View fiddlebanshee's profile

fiddlebanshee

240 posts in 3485 days


#23 posted 10-11-2018 03:50 PM

Wow, thanks for all the replies and the interesting discussion. I think I’m going to throw all the bottles out. I’m headed for woodcraft this afternoon to pick up my sharpened blades and I’m going to pick up a whole new supply.

I did glue the sliding cabinet doors that I recently made with this glue and that’ll be the litmus test. If they hold, it probably was still good, but they are also relatively easy to redo so I’m not going to loose sleep over it.

Thanks again!

-- As if I needed another hobby!

View Dwain's profile

Dwain

599 posts in 4399 days


#24 posted 10-11-2018 03:56 PM

Funny this topic came up. I actually had a gallon of glue separate on me. It was many, many years old, like, more that five years old. I had never seen this before so I contacted Titebond to ask about it. They said, yes, this can happen, but only after many years, then, providing FANTASTIC customer service, they sent me a few bottles of new glue to replace the gallon that went bad. IT WAS MY FAULT, I FORGOT ABOUT THE GALLON AND TOLD THEM AS MUCH, AND THEY STILL SENT ME NEW GLUE. I am a big fan because of this service. The moral of the story, and for the OP is that glue won’t stay forever, keep cycling it in your projects, and oh, keep it indoors when not using it.

-- When you earnestly believe you can compensate for a lack of skill by doubling your efforts, there is no end to what you CAN'T do

View Lazyman's profile

Lazyman

4089 posts in 1927 days


#25 posted 10-11-2018 04:52 PM


i think your right from what ive heard adding water to glue is not a good idea and will weaken the bond.

- pottz

I don t know why this person didn t bother to check the manufacturer s web site before posting incorrect information. Must be too much work.

According to Titebond:

Can Titebond Wood Glues be thinned?
Most of our water-based wood glues can be thinned with water up to 5% by weight or by volume. Adding more than 5% water to our glues will decrease the bond strength. Titebond Liquid Hide Glue is thinned by gently heating the bottle in a pan of warm water. Titebond Polyurethane Glue may only be thinned by placing the bottle into a pan of warm water.

- Rich

The response wasn’t about thinning the glue. It was in the context, which you deleted BTW, of fixing glue that has started to thicken. If you’ve found something on the TB website about that, please do share.

-- Nathan, TX -- Hire the lazy man. He may not do as much work but that's because he will find a better way.

View Rich's profile

Rich

5001 posts in 1129 days


#26 posted 10-11-2018 05:55 PM


The response wasn t about thinning the glue. It was in the context, which you deleted BTW, of fixing glue that has started to thicken. If you ve found something on the TB website about that, please do share.

- Lazyman

He said adding water isn’t a good idea and will weaken the bond. I showed on the Titebond site where they said you can add up to 5% water. Call it what you want, but the fact remains that you’re adding water.

View EarlS's profile

EarlS

3214 posts in 2888 days


#27 posted 10-11-2018 06:29 PM

From TB website: “Freezing may not affect the function of the product but may cause it to thicken. Agitation should restore product to original form.” I didn’t see anything about adding water to restore the glue. Freezing likely causes the PVA and water to separate. Agitation re-homogenizes the mixture, that’s all.

If I remember my chemistry from when I was a process engineer in the forest products adhesive world, PVA glue thickens due to age because the PVA (polyvinyl acetate) is cross linking (curing) in the bottle due to air exposure and temperature as the chemical that inhibits the cross linking either degrades or is evaporated. Adding water doesn’t reverse the cross linking. All the water does at that point is dilute the solids. The cross linked glue in the bottle is still essentially useless to the bonding strength (cross linking) of the glue at that point.

-- Earl "I'm a pessamist - generally that increases the chance that things will turn out better than expected"

View Clarkswoodworking's profile

Clarkswoodworking

289 posts in 673 days


#28 posted 10-12-2018 02:23 AM

I pulled out a glue bottle some time ago and it was thicker then normal
But I used it anyway and it worked out fine !
Got lucky I guess

View Charlie H.'s profile

Charlie H.

390 posts in 1190 days


#29 posted 10-13-2018 07:56 PM



Wow, thanks for all the replies and the interesting discussion. I think I m going to throw all the bottles out. I m headed for woodcraft this afternoon to pick up my sharpened blades and I m going to pick up a whole new supply.
- fiddlebanshee

It’s cheaper at Home Depot

-- Regards, Charlie in Rowlett, TX --------I talk to myself, because sometimes I need expert advice.---------

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