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View meecect's profile

Need help figuring out how to replicate this profile

by meecect
posted 10-04-2018 01:52 PM


8 replies so far

View bilyo's profile

bilyo

696 posts in 1498 days


#1 posted 10-04-2018 02:34 PM

All I have some thoughts. As far as material to use; you might look into using vinyl lumber. I have no experience with it and only know about it through some TV home improvement/rehab shows I’ve seen. It looks like it is easy to work and should hold up well outdoors.

The edge profile looks like it could be made with a 45* router bit with the cut started and stopped short of the short cross pieces. The curved return (is that called a lamb’s tongue?) would require a bit of chisel and rasp work, I guess. A template might also work, but it looks like some chisel work will still be required to get the square inside cut at the base of the “lamb’s tougue” (if that is what it’s called).

Otherwise, I think I would just build up the whole component starting with a flat backer with the side verticals and cross pieces fastened/glued to it. Or, even though you think the original is not a true frame and panel, the replacement could be built that way.

Please post some photos of the finished product. Good luck.

View bondogaposis's profile

bondogaposis

5416 posts in 2747 days


#2 posted 10-04-2018 02:56 PM

I think that you are wrong about the frame a panel. I’ve used that profile on frame and panel doors quite a bit. It is done with a 45° V-groove bit and a jig on the router that is not hard to make. You make the frame and panel assembly first, then you route the profile around the inside edge. I’ll post a picture of the jig later, when I get out to the shop.

-- Bondo Gaposis

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bondogaposis

5416 posts in 2747 days


#3 posted 10-04-2018 05:16 PM

Photos of the router jig for doing this, as promised. The first pic, shows the jig itself. The second 2 show it mounted on my trim router with the V-groove bit inserted. It is made of 1/4” MDF. You have to be careful not to set the bit too deep or it will gouge the panel. The depth is based on how much reveal you have between the frame and panel. For most of my purposes I use it on a 1/4” panel centered in a 3/4” frame that gives me a 1/4” reveal. Your photos show a deeper reveal I believe, and you would have to set the bit for a deeper cut.

-- Bondo Gaposis

View meecect's profile

meecect

3 posts in 266 days


#4 posted 10-04-2018 08:23 PM

Thanks, that’s great. I figured there was a simple jiog for this. I’ll check more closely to see if they actually have a panel or it is just layered up on a backer to make it look like a panel. Seems to not make any difference in the construction on the bevel though. Even if they used actual panel constuction, I may use the layered up approach..although I’m a bit worried about thermal expansion breaking the layers loose at some point.

What about wood species? Any recommendations?

View Smitty_Cabinetshop's profile (online now)

Smitty_Cabinetshop

16134 posts in 3014 days


#5 posted 10-04-2018 08:43 PM

Poplar would be a good choice. Cypress if it gets wet, but know that it’s quite soft. Doug Fir, tight grain, might be a traditional option.

The flair is a stopped chamfer with lamb’s tongue.

-- Don't anthropomorphize your handplanes. They hate it when you do that. -- OldTools Archive --

View bilyo's profile

bilyo

696 posts in 1498 days


#6 posted 10-04-2018 08:50 PM


I think that you are wrong about the frame a panel. I ve used that profile on frame and panel doors quite a bit. It is done with a 45° V-groove bit and a jig on the router that is not hard to make. You make the frame and panel assembly first, then you route the profile around the inside edge. I ll post a picture of the jig later, when I get out to the shop.

- bondogaposis

That’s a nice jig and does a nice job. However, if meecect wants/needs to replicate the profile more precisely, please look again carefully. I believe that the return at the beginning and end of the bevel cut is convex, not cocave. The easy way is to do as you have shown and simply stop the cut leaving a concave profile equal to the radius of the cutter. If he wants a convex return as is the original, I think some chisel work is required.

Smitty got it right. Not sure how it’s done, however.

View meecect's profile

meecect

3 posts in 266 days


#7 posted 10-04-2018 10:00 PM

As far as wood goes, any thoughts on Jarrah, Cumaru, American Cherry? I agree that Douglas Fir is probably more authentic, but looking for something that will stain beautifully and last a long time.

View Eric's profile

Eric

79 posts in 269 days


#8 posted 10-04-2018 11:16 PM

Pvc boards are easy to cut. But it will also tear out if you are not careful..

I agree Douglas fir for tratrdition, not sure how it will stain up. Oak is another one you could use.

As for the raised panels, I have used a table saw to cut a cove. It takes a little time because you have to make shallow cuts, running the board against a sacrificial fence. It takes time for the correct set up for the look you want. Experiment with it.

For the sidelight frame you may want to make it a bit thicker to accommodate the panels. Also a build up of different trim pieces may work out for you. Again for the look you want.

Good luck on you project

-- Eric, Upstate South Carolina

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