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Buying On Line

by MrRon
posted 09-29-2018 05:32 PM


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70 replies

70 replies so far

View Fred Hargis's profile

Fred Hargis

5741 posts in 3000 days


#1 posted 09-29-2018 06:05 PM

Not sure what you mean “victim to online shopping”, but we buy a huge amount of stuff on line. Have I been shorted/cheated/disappointed? Sure, a few times. But when you deal with vendors that you trust the complaints are very minimal, and resolved to the customers satisfaction. We live in what most consider a rural area, and trying to find something at the local stores usually involves running all over trying to locate the item….and even then not finding it. As for tools, all of my major new tool purchases have been on line, and most (probably 90%) of my smaller tool purchases have been on line.

Oops, one small correction: I did buy my drill press locally (1992) when a local box store had them marked for clearance.

-- Our village hasn't lost it's idiot, he was elected to congress.

View AlaskaGuy's profile

AlaskaGuy

5350 posts in 2816 days


#2 posted 09-29-2018 06:29 PM

Seems like the whole world is shopping online to the point it killing many brick and mortar stores and killing shopping malls. I figure with so many people doing it, it can be all that bad.

You just have to use common sense and remember caveat emptor (buyer beware). You have some responsible too.

Common sense has kept me away from those late night TV commercials.

-- Alaskan's for Global warming!

View WhyMe's profile

WhyMe

1177 posts in 2068 days


#3 posted 09-29-2018 06:47 PM

I’ve made dozens of purchases on-line and only once have I had a bad experience. It was an ebay purchase where the item was not listed accurately and what I received was not what I expected. The seller was a total pain about taking the item back and ebay ended up refunding me my money. The seller attempted to update the item information but ebay keeps history of changes and it showed where the original listing did not correctly describe the item.

View AHuxley's profile

AHuxley

874 posts in 3829 days


#4 posted 09-29-2018 07:04 PM

My family has made upwards of 10,000 online purchases over the last 20 or so years. Just counting myself I have gotten 11 shipments just this week. The vast majority of our purchases non-food related are online. Everything from $2-3 items to $10k+. Out of all those, I can only think of 2 I had an issue with (now my wife exchanges clothes/shoes fairly regularly for size issues). One Amazon sent the wrong item and the other was damaged in shipping. It is extremely easy to vet online sellers. I do see people asking about the silly Facebook tool ads for 1/2 current street price where the site is a week or so old and registered in China but yo have the be very internet naive to get caught by those. I also buy quite a bit on eBay, maybe 50 purchases a year, eBay has the strongest buyer protection anywhere on the web.

I can’t even fathom how much we have saved over the last 20 years with online purchases, it is easily $50k and more likely over $100k.

View MrRon's profile

MrRon

5715 posts in 3751 days


#5 posted 09-29-2018 07:38 PM

On-line retailers have been killing off local businesses with their lower prices, “no tax” and free shipping. It looks like the trend may be reversing. I have heard brick and mortar stores are coming back Amazon announced they are going to open hundreds of B&M stores in major cities; that may be in response to the government requiring on-line vendors to charge tax.Target stores is one that has been showing positive growth through innovation.

Buying on-line has always been risky. On one post on this forum I just read, someone wanted to order a $1.88 part, but the shipping was $20. That has swayed many including myself from ordering on-line. One of the biggest complaints has been receiving damaged goods. sometimes it has been resolved and other times not. Either way, it requires much action on the part of the consumer to get the situation resolved. I’m sure most would prefer to see the item in person than unseen a thousand miles away. Sure I have bought things on-line, but only if I can’t find it locally. It’s a way for me to support my local businesses and to get support if the item doesn’t satisfy. Several months ago, I ordered a mattress on-line because it was “free shipping”; well after two weeks, I get an e-mail telling me “they were sorry about the delay and were reordering and that I would receive it in a week”. A week later, it still hadn’t arrived, so I called and was informed of the delay. I cancelled the order and bought the mattress locally. It could have been delivered free in a few days, but not wanting to wait, I went and picked it up myself. I’m sure you will be hearing more complaints in the future. Americans have always been able to give others the benefit of doubt, but there comes a time when people will rise up and say enough is enough; We want value and service for our hard earned dollars and we demand it. You may have noticed Europeans are more demanding about their purchases than we are. From my experience, they won’t accept shoddy goods. That same goes for people all around the world. I see all the time, we as Americans accepting shoddy goods because it is inconvenient to return it (on-line purchase).

View MrRon's profile

MrRon

5715 posts in 3751 days


#6 posted 09-29-2018 07:49 PM


My family has made upwards of 10,000 online purchases over the last 20 or so years. Just counting myself I have gotten 11 shipments just this week. The vast majority of our purchases non-food related are online. Everything from $2-3 items to $10k+. Out of all those, I can only think of 2 I had an issue with (now my wife exchanges clothes/shoes fairly regularly for size issues). One Amazon sent the wrong item and the other was damaged in shipping. It is extremely easy to vet online sellers. I do see people asking about the silly Facebook tool ads for 1/2 current street price where the site is a week or so old and registered in China but yo have the be very internet naive to get caught by those. I also buy quite a bit on eBay, maybe 50 purchases a year, eBay has the strongest buyer protection anywhere on the web.

I can t even fathom how much we have saved over the last 20 years with online purchases, it is easily $50k and more likely over $100k.

- AHuxley


The only place that I deal with on a steady basis is McMaster-Carr. They always have what I need. The shipping is a bit high, but I receive my order, usually within two or three days. I buy on-line when what I need is not available locally.

View JAAune's profile

JAAune

1870 posts in 2824 days


#7 posted 09-29-2018 07:55 PM

I buy online as much as possible. The local stores rarely carry the quality/specialty products I want and it’s difficult to judge the usefulness of an item by looking at the fancy packaging.

I find the cost of gas and the time spent driving to stores is often more expensive than the cost of shipping. A round trip from the shop to Menards costs $2.75 in gas, plus wear and tear on the truck and consumes at least 45 minutes of my time. $15 for shipping is cheap by comparison.

Local shopping trips are usually done when I need to run other errands in the area or if I need something right away.

-- See my work at http://remmertstudios.com and http://altaredesign.com

View diverlloyd's profile

diverlloyd

3638 posts in 2364 days


#8 posted 09-29-2018 07:56 PM

The only online purchases I have made were for parts that my local suppliers said they would have to order them online. So if they are going to order them and I can order from the same supplier then I will. Unless it’s a Datsun part then I’m forced to order online. I have ordered maybe 10 things from online one was a nightmare but was made right after telling the seller I have the return address and we can talk about your misleading advertisement in person. He was quick to send me the right item. I will be ordering a new battery for my phone from amazon. I went to buy it from a local battery store they don’t have them but will have to order one it will be a month for their brand or they can order it off amazon and have it shipped to me. They will be buying from a seller that the battery is $20 shipped with the tools to replace it but they will be charging me their retail price of $145 for the battery just to place a amazon order. I will order it myself

View AlaskaGuy's profile

AlaskaGuy

5350 posts in 2816 days


#9 posted 09-29-2018 08:11 PM

I do like buying form brick and mortar stores as much as possible. I like to see/fell before buying if possible. Many items are just not available in stores so for many things I have to go to online stores.

-- Alaskan's for Global warming!

View lumbering_on's profile

lumbering_on

578 posts in 997 days


#10 posted 09-29-2018 08:21 PM


On-line retailers have been killing off local businesses with their lower prices, “no tax” and free shipping. It looks like the trend may be reversing. I have heard brick and mortar stores are coming back Amazon announced they are going to open hundreds of B&M stores in major cities; that may be in response to the government requiring on-line vendors to charge tax.Target stores is one that has been showing positive growth through innovation.

Buying on-line has always been risky. On one post on this forum I just read, someone wanted to order a $1.88 part, but the shipping was $20. That has swayed many including myself from ordering on-line. One of the biggest complaints has been receiving damaged goods. sometimes it has been resolved and other times not. Either way, it requires much action on the part of the consumer to get the situation resolved. I m sure most would prefer to see the item in person than unseen a thousand miles away. Sure I have bought things on-line, but only if I can t find it locally. It s a way for me to support my local businesses and to get support if the item doesn t satisfy. Several months ago, I ordered a mattress on-line because it was “free shipping”; well after two weeks, I get an e-mail telling me “they were sorry about the delay and were reordering and that I would receive it in a week”. A week later, it still hadn t arrived, so I called and was informed of the delay. I cancelled the order and bought the mattress locally. It could have been delivered free in a few days, but not wanting to wait, I went and picked it up myself. I m sure you will be hearing more complaints in the future. Americans have always been able to give others the benefit of doubt, but there comes a time when people will rise up and say enough is enough; We want value and service for our hard earned dollars and we demand it. You may have noticed Europeans are more demanding about their purchases than we are. From my experience, they won t accept shoddy goods. That same goes for people all around the world. I see all the time, we as Americans accepting shoddy goods because it is inconvenient to return it (on-line purchase).

- MrRon

That was me who had the issue with the $20 for a $1.88 part. To be fair it was a replacement part for a track saw, and wasn’t something that was a common order. Still, if there was a factory repair center nearby, as most companies used to have, the part would likely have cost a few dollars more, but there would have been no shipping. In the end, I made a wooden replacement which works, although it would be nice to have an actually part and not a shop-built replacement.

I actually avoid buying online for the most part, and not really because I find it a ripoff. I just like to be able to go to a store, see the product up close, feel it, and try it out if possible. I’ve been buying things off Amazon for eight years, but I’ve literally spent more at Lowes, Home Depot and Canadian tire in one visit than I’ve spent all that time on Amazon.

I think the online model is actually detrimental in many respects to merchants. I can go on Amazon look around and just say, nah, close up the browser and go about my day. Now, get me into Lee Valley, the Borg or Canadian Tire, and suddenly I discover several items I never knew I needed.

View ChuckV's profile

ChuckV

3237 posts in 4034 days


#11 posted 09-29-2018 08:31 PM

I find that returning things to Amazon is usually easier than returning them to a real store. Many times I just print a pre-paid UPS label from Amazon and in a few days the UPS truck comes to my house to get the package. What could be easier?

-- “Big man, pig man, ha ha, charade you are.” ― R. Waters

View lumbering_on's profile

lumbering_on

578 posts in 997 days


#12 posted 09-29-2018 08:35 PM



I find that returning things to Amazon is usually easier than returning them to a real store. Many times I just print a pre-paid UPS label from Amazon and in a few days the UPS truck comes to my house to get the package. What could be easier?

- ChuckV

Not having to return an item because you bought it in a store and knew exactly what you were buying? ;) :)

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ChuckV

3237 posts in 4034 days


#13 posted 09-29-2018 09:55 PM

Almost all of my Amazon returns have been for failures that could not be detected by touching the outside of the product packaging, so buying at a store would not have helped.

I really enjoy shopping in some stores, talking with the employees, and just browsing around. Others drive me away. We bought a laptop at Best Buy. In a few days, one of the keys starting sticking. We returned it and got a replacement. But we had to listen to the snotty employee tell us that we better buy the Protection Plan because if the key had failed after 30 days, we would have paid a minimum of $150, lost our US citizenship, and worked the rest of our days in the salt mines, or something like that.

The CPU fan on the new one lasted about a week. We returned it for a refund.

-- “Big man, pig man, ha ha, charade you are.” ― R. Waters

View squazo's profile

squazo

139 posts in 2152 days


#14 posted 09-29-2018 10:10 PM

I bought a saw from evolution power tools,through amazon I think. It was total garbage the motor burnt out, warranty was not honored so they sold me a motor at cost it burnt out and then they stopped answering my emails. Other than that just minor shipping issues mostly.

View Gene Howe's profile

Gene Howe

11845 posts in 3936 days


#15 posted 09-29-2018 10:12 PM

We buy most non food items…and a few non perishable food items on line. But, we’re 100+ miles from any wood working stores. And, it’s a 50 mile RT to a decent hardware store.
Amazon, E Bay, and Costco get most of our on line business.
As JAAune said, it’s very convenirent and, far less expensive in time and $$ to buy on line.

-- Gene 'The true soldier fights not because he hates what is in front of him, but because he loves what is behind him.' G. K. Chesterton

View becikeja's profile

becikeja

1013 posts in 3320 days


#16 posted 09-29-2018 10:31 PM

On-Line – Have not been to a retail store in over a year, don’t ever plan to go back.. I buy everything from tools to toothpaste. You do have to be a bit patient especially with clothes, sometimes you have a few returns. But not having to go to a mall or fight the crowds is well worth it in the end.

-- Don't outsmart your common sense

View AlaskaGuy's profile

AlaskaGuy

5350 posts in 2816 days


#17 posted 09-29-2018 11:22 PM

Return too many items on Amazon? Will Amazon Ban your Account?

https://www.techwalls.com/amazon-ban-return-too-many-items/

-- Alaskan's for Global warming!

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runswithscissors

3071 posts in 2532 days


#18 posted 09-29-2018 11:47 PM

When I ordered a 100 watt solar collector off Ebay and received a skate board, I sensed that something wasn’t right. It required photos plus several emails to resolve the problem to the point that I actually got the solar collector. It wasn’t worth it to them (people in China) to have me ship the skateboard back, so they asked me to sell it locally and send them the money. I was sorely tempted to keep the cash, but my correspondent made it clear that he would suffer unduly if I didn’t send it to him. He said the skateboard was worth only $25, which was a heck of a lot less than I’d paid for the solar collector.

The whole thing was obviously a warehouse blunder, and I took pity on the guy. It wasn’t an intentional screw up.

-- I admit to being an adrenaline junky; fortunately, I'm very easily frightened

View CWWoodworking's profile

CWWoodworking

528 posts in 686 days


#19 posted 09-30-2018 12:48 AM

I’m a mixed bag-

Consumables-most wood, screws, glue, drawer glides, etc. All of these are local because of price. They hands down beat the internet and it’s not close. Now I live in an area with 4-$300+ million dollar companies. So my distributors are buying hugh quantities and I am piggy backing off of that. Not everyone has that luxury

Machinery, and 2 types of wood-Grizzly and Menards. I generally like Grizzlys value, but may give my local guy a shot on a jet table saw when the time comes. He recently beat the internet on a kreg Forman. The 2 types of wood from Menards are a ridiculous value. No one can even come close.

I will buy from wherever I get the price/service. I love my local guys, but I would drop them like a bad habit if I could save enough. They know this, that’s why there prices are so good.

View JADobson's profile

JADobson

1445 posts in 2618 days


#20 posted 09-30-2018 03:17 AM


I have been following all such complaints, mostly out of curiosity, but also so I personally don t fall victim.

- MrRon

All of them???!?

-- No craft is very far from the line beyond which is magic. -- Lord Dunsany — Instagram @grailwoodworks

View Charlie H.'s profile

Charlie H.

388 posts in 1157 days


#21 posted 09-30-2018 03:32 PM



I have heard many complaints from people who buy on-line and were not happy with the outcome. This isn t limited to major purchases such as machinery, but also to everyday things, like those “as seen on TV” items. I have been following all such complaints, mostly out of curiosity, but also so I personally don t fall victim. It usually takes just one or maybe two bad experiences before skepticism becomes a part of the shopping experience. This post is prompted by the complaints I read on this forum and the questions people ask about purchasing tools, usually on-line. It would be of interest to many to hear from others who have become victim to on-line shopping.
- MrRon

Well, if someone buys the RonCo bald spot cover up paint I wouldn’t classify them as a victim and then I wouldn’t put to much stock in any complaint they might make later about it.

My experiences with mail order are very positive.

-- Regards, Charlie in Rowlett, TX --------I talk to myself, because sometimes I need expert advice.---------

View bondogaposis's profile

bondogaposis

5540 posts in 2858 days


#22 posted 09-30-2018 03:35 PM

I buy everything on line, I hate stores.

-- Bondo Gaposis

View AlaskaGuy's profile

AlaskaGuy

5350 posts in 2816 days


#23 posted 09-30-2018 04:01 PM



I buy everything on line, I hate stores.

- bondogaposis


What do you do if you want ice cream?

-- Alaskan's for Global warming!

View Redoak49's profile

Redoak49

4181 posts in 2496 days


#24 posted 09-30-2018 04:11 PM

I am. always worried about buying a major tool online and mostly about shipping issues. If I can I will go to Woodcraft or something similar and buy it and typically the price is the same. There are many reported problems with shipping damage and difficulty resolving them.

The last major tool I had delivered a 5 hp cyclone by FedEx and no damage at all.

It is likely a very difficult thing for sellers with shipping damage. I am certain that many times the shipper denies responsibility but the seller has to fight back along with the purchaser to get the shipping compete pay up. The seller can not afford to cover shipping damage. I will say that some companies do a much better job with packing to eliminate damage but we know that better packing costs more money.

View lumbering_on's profile

lumbering_on

578 posts in 997 days


#25 posted 09-30-2018 04:14 PM



I am. always worried about buying a major tool online and mostly about shipping issues. If I can I will go to Woodcraft or something similar and buy it and typically the price is the same. There are many reported problems with shipping damage and difficulty resolving them.

The last major tool I had delivered a 5 hp cyclone by FedEx and no damage at all.

It is likely a very difficult thing for sellers with shipping damage. I am certain that many times the shipper denies responsibility but the seller has to fight back along with the purchaser to get the shipping compete pay up. The seller can not afford to cover shipping damage. I will say that some companies do a much better job with packing to eliminate damage but we know that better packing costs more money.

- Redoak49

Damage is probably not as common as theft. I’ve had items left on my door when I watched the truck pull away, and they don’t even bother to check if you’re at home. And good luck if it’s stolen, UPS, FedEx or whatever idiots that delivered it won’t take responsibility.

View AlaskaGuy's profile

AlaskaGuy

5350 posts in 2816 days


#26 posted 09-30-2018 04:37 PM

Knock on wood, I have ordered all my big equipment online, Jointer/planer, Combination sliding saw/shaper, widebelt sander, dust collector, 24 inch band saw and more with no damage or theft.

For the big stuff I always ship terminal to terminal and go pick it up my self. Of course I hire a slide back auto carrier to go with me. At the terminal they fork lift the machine on to the auto carrier. The slide back auto carrier backs up to my shop door, tilts the bed at an angle and extend it bed into my shop and on to my shop floor. As the say easy pleasy I get to supervise it all.

Never had anything stolen off my porch/deck either. If fact just the opposite. I came home one day to find a package on my deck. As you know I live in Alaska the package was addressed to someone in California of all place. After a couple phone calls they told me to just keep it. What what is? A DeWalt 90 degree angle drill, batter operated.

As a side note:
49 companies Amazon could destroy (and 1 it already has)

https://www.msn.com/en-us/money/companies/49-companies-amazon-could-destroy-and-1-it-already-has/ss-BBMSvFZ?li=BBnb7Kz#image=1

This is not good if you ask me.

-- Alaskan's for Global warming!

View lumbering_on's profile

lumbering_on

578 posts in 997 days


#27 posted 09-30-2018 04:50 PM

AlaskaGuy,I’m just wondering how UPS could confuse Alaska for the lower 48? Still, nice find. :)

Theft is actually such an issue that there was are a number of cases where one delivery driver will steal a package delivered by another courier, or even their own packages they were supposed to deliver.

https://www.google.ca/search?rlz=1C1CHBF_enCA779CA779&ei=Yv6wW5OGM6GKjwSk_5X4DQ&q=delivery+driver+steals+package&oq=delivery+driver+steals+package&gs_l=psy-ab.3...73140.77723.0.78314.32.18.0.3.3.0.157.812.5j3.9.0....0...1c.1.64.psy-ab..20.12.898.6..0j35i39k1j0i131k1j0i131i67k1j0i67k1.80.kQX1EfhL2gU

View bondogaposis's profile

bondogaposis

5540 posts in 2858 days


#28 posted 09-30-2018 06:59 PM

Link

I buy everything on line, I hate stores.

- bondogaposis

What do you do if you want ice cream?

- AlaskaGuy

-- Bondo Gaposis

View ChuckV's profile

ChuckV

3237 posts in 4034 days


#29 posted 09-30-2018 08:21 PM


Link

I buy everything on line, I hate stores.

- bondogaposis

What do you do if you want ice cream?

- AlaskaGuy

- bondogaposis

This makes me think of my son’s mouse supplier for his snake:
https://bigcheeserodents.com/shipping/

The ice cream probably tastes better!

-- “Big man, pig man, ha ha, charade you are.” ― R. Waters

View Woodknack's profile

Woodknack

12905 posts in 2887 days


#30 posted 10-01-2018 05:41 AM



https://www.msn.com/en-us/money/companies/49-companies-amazon-could-destroy-and-1-it-already-has/ss-BBMSvFZ?li=BBnb7Kz#image=1

This is not good if you ask me.

- AlaskaGuy

I can’t find the story, it’s like 9,000 advertisements.

-- Rick M, http://thewoodknack.blogspot.com/

View AlaskaGuy's profile

AlaskaGuy

5350 posts in 2816 days


#31 posted 10-01-2018 06:06 AM


https://www.msn.com/en-us/money/companies/49-companies-amazon-could-destroy-and-1-it-already-has/ss-BBMSvFZ?li=BBnb7Kz#image=1

This is not good if you ask me.

- AlaskaGuy
Really? When I click on it, it take me right to the story.

Hers a screen shot of where that link it takes me

I can t find the story, it s like 9,000 advertisements.

- Woodknack


-- Alaskan's for Global warming!

View AlaskaGuy's profile

AlaskaGuy

5350 posts in 2816 days


#32 posted 10-01-2018 06:10 AM

View becikeja's profile

becikeja

1013 posts in 3320 days


#33 posted 10-01-2018 11:58 AM

Remember Sears?? They owned the mail order retail business. Remember getting the Christmas catalog? It was their industry to lose and did they ever lose it. Amazon owns the space for now, I can buy at 3:00 AM if I want, never have to wait in line, and can search multiple products and vendors in minutes. If other retailers can’t keep up they should be driven out of business. Meet the customers expectation and you will survive. Better yet, define the customers expectation as Amazon has done and you will climb to the top. The next retail revolution will come, just a matter of time and Amazon will fall. It’s called capitalism, embrace it, it works.

-- Don't outsmart your common sense

View MJClark's profile

MJClark

36 posts in 392 days


#34 posted 10-01-2018 12:52 PM

I am 50/50 with online shopping for tools. However with the exception of one situation, I have great success with buying online. The one situation was a bit my fault as I ordered from a company that I did not look into and they tried to seal my debit card info, but the bank caught it right away.

View Steve's profile

Steve

1579 posts in 1090 days


#35 posted 10-01-2018 01:31 PM

Only thing I dont’ like buying online are clothes. Mainly from Cabela’s, since their sizing seems to be completely out of whack.

View Brian Talbert's profile

Brian Talbert

35 posts in 578 days


#36 posted 10-01-2018 01:51 PM

I had to double check the date on the original post as I thought it was just an old resurfaced thread … I think the retail shopping experience is wholly transformed at this point. It is fully blended between online and in-person experiences and the differentiators are no longer between online or not. Shop from places you trust. Places that provide a great customer experience. Places that offer you buyer confidence.

I have purchased everything from cars to icecream both online and in-store. I have had negative online as well as in-store experiences. I may decide to not buy from certain retailers or decide that I need a tactile experience for a particular item, but I can’t imagine just wholesale avoiding an entire mode of shopping at this point … i think we are way beyond the concerns being “online”.

-- www.instagram.com/w.brian.talbert/

View MrRon's profile

MrRon

5715 posts in 3751 days


#37 posted 10-01-2018 02:44 PM



I had to double check the date on the original post as I thought it was just an old resurfaced thread … I think the retail shopping experience is wholly transformed at this point. It is fully blended between online and in-person experiences and the differentiators are no longer between online or not. Shop from places you trust. Places that provide a great customer experience. Places that offer you buyer confidence.

I have purchased everything from cars to icecream both online and in-store. I have had negative online as well as in-store experiences. I may decide to not buy from certain retailers or decide that I need a tactile experience for a particular item, but I can t imagine just wholesale avoiding an entire mode of shopping at this point … i think we are way beyond the concerns being “online”.

- Geeph


Buying on-line is definitely an experience for each buyer. It mostly depends on where you are located that determines where you buy. Items like food and clothing is usually bought locally and “hard-to-find” items have to be purchased on-line. Obviously if you want a certain machine tool that you can’t find locally or within a reasonable distance, on-line is the only way. There are city dwellers and country dwellers and each has his/her buying habits.

View Waldo88's profile

Waldo88

207 posts in 1804 days


#38 posted 10-01-2018 03:42 PM

Its 2018 and there are still people that don’t buy things online? For real?

I do almost all my shopping online. Clothes, groceries, and the stuff the Target sells are the only exception.

The modern in-person retail experience is one person checking out a dozen people, most of whom have issues that can’t be quickly solved, and a store with nonsensical organization staffed by no-nothings who know where nothing is. So you wander aimlessly attempting to find whatever it is you came for, then after you finally stumble apon it after numerous dead ends that random employees “help” you find, you are given the chance to stand in line for a half hour and wait to check out, cashier frazzled with problem after problem. Then the old lady whips out her checkbook and everyone in line groans, as another 5 min have been tacked on the wonderful experience.

I designed and built a new set of front doors for our house specifically with online shopping in mind. The old doors were just big hunks of wood, but the new ones are slab doors with retro lites cut in, and each door (double door) has one at the bottom so you can easily see packages when walking by. With our old doors packages could sit at the door for days if we weren’t expecting it.

I expect in the next 10-20 years lockable boxes (app controlled) with temperature control and a drone beacon will become the norm at everyone’s front door. Once drone delivery takes off for last mile service, shopping in-person will be relegated to browsing type shopping like art fairs and farmers markets. Employing an army of robotic delivery drones is cheaper than employing the people necessary for an in-person retail experience. Its much more efficient for consumers as well. Drone delivery hasn’t hit final approval from the FAA but its very close, once that hurdle is cleared things will move very fast.

View lumbering_on's profile

lumbering_on

578 posts in 997 days


#39 posted 10-01-2018 04:13 PM



Its 2018 and there are still people that don t buy things online? For real?

I do almost all my shopping online. Clothes, groceries, and the stuff the Target sells are the only exception.

The modern in-person retail experience is one person checking out a dozen people, most of whom have issues that can t be quickly solved, and a store with nonsensical organization staffed by no-nothings who know where nothing is. So you wander aimlessly attempting to find whatever it is you came for, then after you finally stumble apon it after numerous dead ends that random employees “help” you find, you are given the chance to stand in line for a half hour and wait to check out, cashier frazzled with problem after problem. Then the old lady whips out her checkbook and everyone in line groans, as another 5 min have been tacked on the wonderful experience.

- Waldo88

Maybe a little off topic, but can someone explain to me, as a simple Canadian, why the US still uses cheques (translation- checks) so often? I still have a book of 100 cheques I was sent about 20 years ago, but I know people who live in the US that seem to use that in a few months.

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kkaucher

23 posts in 827 days


#40 posted 10-01-2018 04:59 PM



Link

I buy everything on line, I hate stores.

- bondogaposis

What do you do if you want ice cream?

- AlaskaGuy

- bondogaposis

Roll your own:
https://www.amazon.com/Cuisinart-ICE-21-Quart-Frozen-Yogurt-Ice/dp/B003KYSLMW?crid=3KS16DO9AZA5T&keywords=ice+cream+makers+electric&qid=1538413012&sprefix=ice+cream+maker%2Caps%2C186&sr=8-4&ref=sr_1_4

-- A bad day woodworking is better than a good day working. ~Author unknown

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pottz

6332 posts in 1491 days


#41 posted 10-01-2018 05:40 PM

yeah im big on buying online much easier especially amazon,many complain about them but they got where they are by being cheaper faster and more convienent,and there service is great.ive really never had an problems with my online purchases from any ive dealt with.maybe im lucky?

-- sawdust the bigger the pile the bigger my smile-larry,so cal.

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Tedstor

1678 posts in 3140 days


#42 posted 10-01-2018 05:52 PM

I ordered a PALS kit from inline industries almost three weeks ago. I still don’t have my PALS. Even worse, the company won’t respond to email and doesn’t answer their phone.
I actually considered the possibility that the owner may have died or is infirmed. But further research indicates that this is the norm, the owner is just inept at filling orders, and I’ll probably get my kit eventually.
Still frustrating though. If you suck at the internet, you have no business selling stuff on the internet.

View ocean's profile

ocean

179 posts in 1340 days


#43 posted 10-01-2018 06:02 PM

We buy a lot of items on line. We are prime members so Amazon gets most of our orders. Free shipping (Amazon Prime $120) is not free from anyone. The shipping price is already added to the price you see on-line on all the products they sell. As they say “there is NO free lunch”. The best reason for shopping on line is not having to run around looking for the best price and wasting your day away, no to mention the gas savings, which can be the cost of shipping for us (Keys to Miami -75 miles one way). As for big tools I only buy from dealers with tools in stock where I can look them over. No broken parts or missing parts.

-- Bob, FL Keys

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AHuxley

874 posts in 3829 days


#44 posted 10-01-2018 07:55 PM


Its 2018 and there are still people that don t buy things online? For real?

Honestly, the OP kinda baffles me. It really is a thread I would have expected to see 15-20 years ago but not today. I suppose there are people who shy away from buying on the internet but they simply don’t exist in my circle of family and friends except for the ones who are late 70’s or older and simply do not have internet service. However, most of those older people in my family use someone in their family to buy online for them, they are comfortable with the process just don’t have the infrastructure or knowledge to do it for themselves.

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Ocelot

2354 posts in 3145 days


#45 posted 10-01-2018 09:36 PM

Hmmm. I don’t expect everybody to conform to whatever is popular.

I buy stuff online and at stores, though I personally have almost no time to go to stores. My wife does – often taking 5 children with her. She loves Walmart grocery pickup, where you order online, drive to the place and somebody comes out and loads it into the van. The kids stay in their seats. It’s less than 30 minutes round trip from the house. It takes longer to carry the stuff in than it does to go get it.

But if you are retired, don’t often keep small children and like chatting with folks, why not go to the store and take your time choosing the things you want.

I’ve had a few online mishaps, but nothing too awful. It is frustrating, however to buy something – even a little thing (like a pair of basic salt/pepper shakers) – that arrives broken – and then spend 1/2 hour or more trying to figure out how to get Amazon to refund me – which has happened a couple of times.

One time on eBay, I bought a commercial (restaurant type) dishwasher, drove about 1.5 hours one way to pick it up towing a U-Haul trailer – and when I needed to return it (because it’s condition was misrepresented by the seller – but had promised 30-day return), eBay sent me a mailing label! Fortunately, eBay has a “high value item” customer service team, who actually talked to me on the phone and facilitated the return (I still had to rent the trailer again and make the round trip). So, I was out 2 days rental on the trailer, gas and my time, but they took the thing back and I got my money back and bought a new one for more than 2x dollars. I’m sure I would have fared worse with Craig’s List, although I’ve had good success there in general.

-Paul

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ohtimberwolf

936 posts in 2859 days


#46 posted 10-01-2018 10:20 PM

I recently bought an air compressor from a company I didn’t know anything about. It was California Air Compressors and it shipped from there. When it arrived and I unpacked it, it had a head bolt or screw that was stripped. I emailed the company and included a picture and described what was wrong. 10 days later I still had no response from the company. I paid $176.08 in advance by credit card. Not getting a response I called the company during their regular working hours and got a menu choice and selected #1 Customer service. I waited for someone to answer for some time and I got sent back to the same opening message and had to reselect the #1 again. This happened 7 times and the last time I selected Sales and got a message that they were not in.

I did one thing though that saved me. I bought it through an offer that HD had sent me in my email since I didn’t know of the company. HD took the item back and did the shipping for me and gave me my money back in CASH. I learned a lesson there. Don’t buy if you are unsure unless it is an offer from some one who will take care of your problem as HD did for me.
I’m not even a fan of HD but they did come through for me and that means a lot. I believe I would have been stuck!

larry

-- Just a barn cat, now gone to cat heaven.

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Waldo88

207 posts in 1804 days


#47 posted 10-02-2018 02:15 PM

Maybe a little off topic, but can someone explain to me, as a simple Canadian, why the US still uses cheques (translation- checks) so often? I still have a book of 100 cheques I was sent about 20 years ago, but I know people who live in the US that seem to use that in a few months.

- lumbering_on

Its not really “the US”, this is almost strictly an old people thing. I write one check a year, our yearly pool dues at the neighborhood pool. One year they tried out Paypal and it wouldn’t surprise me if the next treasurer goes that way for good. Every year the first step to paying the pool dues is finding the checkbook, which is easier said than done.

If you see someone writing a check in a retail setting, you can count on them being WAY past retirement age.

View Rick  Dennington's profile

Rick Dennington

6651 posts in 3702 days


#48 posted 10-02-2018 02:55 PM

Speaking of eBay…..I’ve only bought 3 items on there in the past…..They were vintage instruments from sellers at different locations….One was a 1946 Martin D-28 Herringbone guitar from a gentleman from Georgia, and a 1957 Martin D-21 from a gentleman from Florida (his wife had died, and he was selling all his vintage instruments), and the other one was a 1952 Gibson F-12 mandolin….( he was a well respected professional bluegrass musician and a friend I’d played on a few shows with a few times)....Al three were packed securely in padded boxes, in their cases, and all arrived in great shape….!! I was nervous a lot never buying like that, but was happy to see them in such good shape, and well taken care of when they arrived….!! That’s my one and only time with eBay…

-- " The secret to staying young looking.....hang around old people.." R.D.

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lumbering_on

578 posts in 997 days


#49 posted 10-02-2018 03:31 PM

Its not really “the US”, this is almost strictly an old people thing. I write one check a year, our yearly pool dues at the neighborhood pool. One year they tried out Paypal and it wouldn t surprise me if the next treasurer goes that way for good. Every year the first step to paying the pool dues is finding the checkbook, which is easier said than done.

If you see someone writing a check in a retail setting, you can count on them being WAY past retirement age.

- Waldo88

The friends I have doing it are in their late 50’s and early 60’s, so it makes sense.

Luckily, I don’t know of any stores that accept cheques these days so we don’t have to suffer that part. However, I do have a rule about going to the grocery store and not getting in line behind women that look like any day may be their last. I can’t even begin to recall the number of times I’ve see elderly women pulling out the exact penny for their bill, even though takes them three days to find their change.

Seems like the biggest reason to shop online.

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Woodknack

12905 posts in 2887 days


#50 posted 10-02-2018 06:04 PM

Probably depends on where you live. I’m in area where you can’t throw a rock without hitting a college and most people are educated and internet savvy, I haven’t seen anyone write a check in a store in probably 5 or 6 years, at least. Surprisingly what I DON’T see are people paying with their phones even though many stores support that now. I’ve been thinking of trying it.

-- Rick M, http://thewoodknack.blogspot.com/

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