LumberJocks

All Replies on Need some help with Greene & Greene dimensioning

  • Advertise with us
View jamsomito's profile

Need some help with Greene & Greene dimensioning

by jamsomito
posted 09-28-2018 02:28 PM


8 replies so far

View LittleShaver's profile

LittleShaver

597 posts in 1160 days


#1 posted 09-28-2018 02:57 PM

When I get into this kind of jam, I’ll take dimensions right off a screen shot of a clear picture of the detail or thing I want. Then a simple ratio to the size I need gets me the dimensions. Usually works best with metric dimensions off the screen and convert later. I’ve even done this with catalogs and magazine pictures. Often the wife spots something and asks me to build it for her. Out some the dividers, scale, and calculator, a quick sketch and off to the shop.

-- Sawdust Maker

View Rich's profile

Rich

5001 posts in 1129 days


#2 posted 09-28-2018 03:26 PM

Find an image online that has proportions that you like and download it, then import it into SketchUp. You can draw a wireframe to outline it, then just delete the imported image and go from there.

Jim Tolpin and George Walker have a couple of books out that do a good job of explaining things like that. It’s easy to look at something and say it’s pleasing or not, but understanding the ratios that make it pleasing really helps.

https://www.byhandandeye.com/books/

View Bill_Steele's profile

Bill_Steele

593 posts in 2272 days


#3 posted 09-28-2018 03:42 PM

I can’t provide you with any specific measurements. I do remember an article in Fine Woodworking (this one) of a side table built in the Greene & Greene style. I might be able to find it and provide some dimensions if you like. I also found a video that William Ng put out on creating the ebony spline used in the breadboard end. If you’ve never seen his videos you should—he’s excellent.

The only other advice I can offer might be to check out something called the golden ratio. Here’s some information on it that I found on the interweb. Here’s a link to something that Fine Woodworking put out on the golden ratio.

View jamsomito's profile

jamsomito

434 posts in 966 days


#4 posted 09-28-2018 04:07 PM

Thanks everyone. I’ve done extensive youtube sleuthing so I think I’ve seen everything from Brian Ng, Marc Spagnuolo, Darrell Peart, and a bunch of smaller channels that’s available. I’ve also tried incorporating the golden ratio but I’m just clueless as to how it’s applied, haha. I appreciate those links Bill, thanks. Rich I may check out that book too.

View EarlS's profile

EarlS

3220 posts in 2888 days


#5 posted 09-28-2018 10:51 PM

I recall seeing an article discussing how to proportion the cloud lift with a ratio between the length of the piece and the height of the top of the arch.

I think FWW has a picture frame kit that you can buy templates for the cloud lifts. That might give you something to start with. The other names mentioned above are all excellent resources.

I’ve always sat down with a piece of MDF that is the size of the piece, a pencil, some circle templates, and a ruler and drawn the cloud lift until the proportions look good. That way you can change little things and keep what looks good until you have a finished template. Then cut it out, sand it and see how it looks. If it looks good, move on to the good wood and template router the actual piece.

-- Earl "I'm a pessamist - generally that increases the chance that things will turn out better than expected"

View jamsomito's profile

jamsomito

434 posts in 966 days


#6 posted 09-28-2018 11:03 PM

So I found this video a while back by Woodworkers Journal: https://youtu.be/uOqMorrxY-I

In it, he gives two cloud lifts they used for a bed frame template, which I wrote down:

Unfortunately these look off to me on my project but I don’t know why. Maybe I just need to keep playing with it more like you say. Or, maybe I need to leave it be and come back to it tomorrow when it will magically look better.

View Rich's profile

Rich

5001 posts in 1129 days


#7 posted 09-29-2018 04:58 AM


So I found this video a while back by Woodworkers Journal: https://youtu.be/uOqMorrxY-I

In it, he gives two cloud lifts they used for a bed frame template, which I wrote down:

Unfortunately these look off to me on my project but I don t know why. Maybe I just need to keep playing with it more like you say. Or, maybe I need to leave it be and come back to it tomorrow when it will magically look better.

- jamsomito

I used cloud lifts for my side table. My template was similar to the second one in the image you posted, except that it’s based on a 1/4” radius. I don’t understand why a 3/16” radius would be used for a 1/4” lift. If you want a 1/4” lift with two curves, then an 1/8” radius would work.

Right or wrong, I did mine with a single 1/4” radius and simply eased the edge on the bottom. It looks good to my eye. Whether it’s “correct” or not, I have no clue. You can see it best in the third photo on my project page. Also, below is the SketchUp detail in the model. The sharp edge as the radius meets the bottom of the aprons and rail was simply softened with sandpaper.

View jamsomito's profile

jamsomito

434 posts in 966 days


#8 posted 09-29-2018 06:47 PM

Rich, that is a mighty fine looking table. Your cloud lifts look great despite the non-traditional shape. Maybe I’m overthinking it.

To those who suggested importing a picture into sketchup, well, it never occurred to me to just take a picture of my sketch and import that. I did it, and things immediately looked better. I was able to toy around with things to get them in workable woodworking measurements and have it still look good. Now that I have things in the ballpark sizes, it’s easy to create the rest using the existing dimensions as references.

Thanks everyone!

Have your say...

You must be signed in to reply.

DISCLAIMER: Any posts on LJ are posted by individuals acting in their own right and do not necessarily reflect the views of LJ. LJ will not be held liable for the actions of any user.

Latest Projects | Latest Blog Entries | Latest Forum Topics

HomeRefurbers.com