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View Dan Thomas's profile

I need help understanding metric users' needs

by Dan Thomas
posted 09-26-2018 09:36 PM


34 replies so far

View lumbering_on's profile

lumbering_on

578 posts in 1029 days


#1 posted 09-26-2018 09:42 PM

I’ll be jiggered if I can figure it out. I’m Canadian so we use metric, unless we don’t. Here’s how things work here

Weight – lbs
Your own height – feet and inches
Speed limits – km/hr
distance – km
height of a building – m or stories.
woodworking – always imperial, unless you’re using metric machine screws or bolts

We’re basically a mess up here.

View Dan Thomas's profile

Dan Thomas

160 posts in 536 days


#2 posted 09-26-2018 10:24 PM

Well, you’re no help! LOL.

-- Newbie Dan, https://www.youtube.com/c/thenewbiewoodworker

View lumbering_on's profile

lumbering_on

578 posts in 1029 days


#3 posted 09-26-2018 10:37 PM

That’s what the metric system does to you. :)

View TravisH's profile

TravisH

686 posts in 2474 days


#4 posted 09-26-2018 10:37 PM

I would leave everything imperial and let them figure it out personally. Honestly those that use metric probably better equipped to convert than the other way around from my experiences.

I don’t mind plans in metric just convert to imperial and round to nearest use able fraction.

View GR8HUNTER's profile

GR8HUNTER

6570 posts in 1251 days


#5 posted 09-26-2018 10:48 PM

Dutchys plans are from Holland yes they are all metric so no problem for me I just measure the piece thats how I convert it over and we are talking precise models here … not a clamp :<))

-- Tony---- Reinholds,Pa.------ REMEMBER TO ALWAYS HAVE FUN

View Dan Thomas's profile

Dan Thomas

160 posts in 536 days


#6 posted 09-26-2018 11:44 PM

Well, I like what I hear so far. It means no extra work for me. :)

-- Newbie Dan, https://www.youtube.com/c/thenewbiewoodworker

View bigJohninvegas's profile

bigJohninvegas

690 posts in 2001 days


#7 posted 09-26-2018 11:50 PM

So I am in Southern Nevada and rarely use metric myself. But I have seen posts from users here on LJ for example that were in metric. I don’t remember seeing any conversions on anyone else’s plans or projects.
However, if it is a simple change with SketchUp. I think I would round numbers for sure.
As for Hardware, do you have a favorite hardware store. Like Mcfadden-Dale.
http://mcfaddendalehardware.com/location.html
They have a pretty amazing inventory of metric hardware. I doubt they stock both a 6mm and 7mm carriage bolt.
What they do stock, I bet is most common.
Here is a conversion chart. Seems Metric may be a bit more simple.
Imperial has 1/4X20 or 1/4X28 thread, where metric would be m6X1.
https://elginfasteners.com/resources/metric-bolt-conversion-metric-to-standard-bolt-conversion/
I am curious now, on how wood screws are labeled in Europe. The chart shows both a decimal and millimeter conversion.
As for the lumber, Most plywood already has a metric measurement listed. Funny, Baltic Birch is listed as 5’X5’ sheet with a metric thickness.
Personally, I have never built anything from a store bought plan. And if it was in metric I would skip it just because I would need to convert it to imperial. So if our metric using friends feel the same as I, then converting is a must for you. Will be interesting to read there comments here.

-- John

View Dan Thomas's profile

Dan Thomas

160 posts in 536 days


#8 posted 09-27-2018 12:01 AM

Well, one thing I’m doing is uploading SketchUp models, and encouraging people to view them. I recently posted a tutorial on how to view them, so I may just point people to the model and say “Watch my video, learn how to view the models, then change the model to metric”. We’ll see.

-- Newbie Dan, https://www.youtube.com/c/thenewbiewoodworker

View oldnovice's profile

oldnovice

7505 posts in 3907 days


#9 posted 09-27-2018 06:09 PM

I don’t use Sketchup, I use Fusion 360 or Creo Elements Direct, both of which can supply dual dimensions.
But, specifying hardware is problematic.
This Web site from the UK may help with wood screws.

-- "I never met a board I didn't like!"

View Dan Thomas's profile

Dan Thomas

160 posts in 536 days


#10 posted 09-27-2018 06:37 PM

Thanks! And regarding your quote of “I never met a board I didn’t like”, you must’ve never been hit with kickback before, right? :p (Just kidding. Kind of.)

-- Newbie Dan, https://www.youtube.com/c/thenewbiewoodworker

View Woodknack's profile

Woodknack

12927 posts in 2919 days


#11 posted 09-27-2018 06:57 PM

Put them in fractions, 33/100 meter. Bonus points for improper fractions, 134/100 cm. Teach those commies the American way. But I would round up to whole numbers when possible, 33.47/100 meter is just being mean.

-- Rick M, http://thewoodknack.blogspot.com/

View Dan Thomas's profile

Dan Thomas

160 posts in 536 days


#12 posted 09-27-2018 08:14 PM

View 000's profile

000

2859 posts in 1438 days


#13 posted 09-27-2018 08:21 PM

It seems to me that metric always has whole numbers. (for example: I don’t ever see 19.3mm. )

It may be easier for you to draw the model in metric (whole numbers) then use sketchup to convert it to Imperial. We can all figure out decimals. For bolts, you would have to find the metric equivalents and use them in your drawings.

Just food for thought, I don’t know what would be best.

View waho6o9's profile

waho6o9

8785 posts in 3116 days


#14 posted 09-27-2018 08:22 PM

LOL

View Dan Thomas's profile

Dan Thomas

160 posts in 536 days


#15 posted 09-27-2018 08:47 PM

jbay – Thanks, I was thinking that also, as far as just redrawing it. But I think at this point, I’m gonna leave it as is. If I get requests from people for metric versions, I’ll see if someone wants to volunteer to to the conversion for everyone.

-- Newbie Dan, https://www.youtube.com/c/thenewbiewoodworker

View roofner's profile

roofner

134 posts in 2822 days


#16 posted 09-28-2018 02:46 AM

Basic numbers are 3/4 in is 19 mm 1.5 stock 3.8 centimeters. multiply inches by 2,54 centimeters.

View lumbering_on's profile

lumbering_on

578 posts in 1029 days


#17 posted 09-28-2018 03:30 AM



It seems to me that metric always has whole numbers. (for example: I don t ever see 19.3mm. )

It may be easier for you to draw the model in metric (whole numbers) then use sketchup to convert it to Imperial. We can all figure out decimals. For bolts, you would have to find the metric equivalents and use them in your drawings.

Just food for thought, I don t know what would be best.

- jbay

You see the decimal place if it’s an imperial part that’s been converted to metric. For example, it’s not uncommon to see 12.7mm router bits, which are the metric for 1/2”.

View AlaskaGuy's profile

AlaskaGuy

5414 posts in 2848 days


#18 posted 09-28-2018 03:40 AM

What are you going to do when you get request for instruction to be in Russian or pygmy?

-- Alaskan's for Global warming!

View 000's profile

000

2859 posts in 1438 days


#19 posted 09-28-2018 04:14 AM

I hear that, the other day I was building a hope chest and the instructions were in pygmy.
When converting to Imperial I think I divided when I should have multiplied.

View Redoak49's profile

Redoak49

4238 posts in 2528 days


#20 posted 09-28-2018 11:00 AM

Leave them imperial.

The real question is will giving both be worth it. Will the increased sales for having metric be worth the effort.

View olegrump's profile

olegrump

97 posts in 761 days


#21 posted 09-28-2018 12:43 PM

Hey, THOSE guys don’t bother to convert THEIR measurements from “centipedes” to REAL measurements on their YouTube posts, why the hell should you? If they are REALLY interested in making your projects, they can damned well use the FREE on-line metric calculator provided by Google. Or they can Man-up and buy a REAL tape measure. You are kind enough to share YOUR projects on-line. If those people need to convert to their system, that is THEIR problem, NOT yours. For myself, I say Thank You for posting your projects foe others to enjoy.

View Dan Thomas's profile

Dan Thomas

160 posts in 536 days


#22 posted 09-28-2018 01:17 PM

You guys crack me up. Here’s more fodor for your amusement: I’m not charging for these plans. I may charge for future plans, but I don’t have an online store set up right now, since my web page is hosted on GitHub.

OK, have fun mocking me. I probably deserve it. :)

-- Newbie Dan, https://www.youtube.com/c/thenewbiewoodworker

View Dave Polaschek's profile

Dave Polaschek

4234 posts in 1121 days


#23 posted 09-28-2018 03:04 PM

I think you just need to express all units in cubits and barleycorns and fathoms, Dan. ;-)

-- Dave - Santa Fe

View Dan Thomas's profile

Dan Thomas

160 posts in 536 days


#24 posted 09-28-2018 03:08 PM

OK, cubits I understand. But I can’t fathom barleycorns. groan

-- Newbie Dan, https://www.youtube.com/c/thenewbiewoodworker

View ChuckV's profile

ChuckV

3244 posts in 4066 days


#25 posted 09-28-2018 03:17 PM

I would like to use the plans but need all dimensions in parsecs. Do you have a parsecs version?

Remember what you learned in second grade: 1 parsec = 1.21483369 X 10^18 inches

Thanks!

-- “Big man, pig man, ha ha, charade you are.” ― R. Waters

View Dave Polaschek's profile

Dave Polaschek

4234 posts in 1121 days


#26 posted 09-28-2018 03:33 PM

Three barleycorns to the inch (roughly, it depends on how wet of a year it was), Dan.

-- Dave - Santa Fe

View Dan Thomas's profile

Dan Thomas

160 posts in 536 days


#27 posted 09-28-2018 03:47 PM

At what point can I just say “I give!”, and you guys will stop? :) Seriously, though, I’ve got work to do. Cut it out!! ;p

-- Newbie Dan, https://www.youtube.com/c/thenewbiewoodworker

View Dave Polaschek's profile

Dave Polaschek

4234 posts in 1121 days


#28 posted 09-28-2018 04:31 PM

Only a furlong or two more. ;-)

-- Dave - Santa Fe

View RobinDobbie's profile

RobinDobbie

147 posts in 2274 days


#29 posted 09-28-2018 04:48 PM

I wanted to say I like your knob. Star knob, that is. :D Most I’ve seen have far too many points or they’re just ugly. That looks elegant, easy, and effective.

How complex are the plans that it’s too difficult to just change the units to metric, then find the (likely very few) components that are interdependent enough need futzing to make right after adjusting dimensions a fraction of a millimeter?

”4) What about dimensional lumber? Should I call it 3/4” plywood, or something else?”

Plywood thickness inconsistency is likely going to cause many users to have to futz with their own project regardless of how well you detail the plans.

View Dan Thomas's profile

Dan Thomas

160 posts in 536 days


#30 posted 09-28-2018 04:54 PM

Regarding the star knob, thanks – here’s a video on them, and I think you’ll like the humor. https://youtu.be/Di_xHYgCE88

They’re not that complicated, but I don’t want to do the work if it’s not really gonna be useful to people. Like I said earlier, I might be able to talk a viewer into doing it for me.

-- Newbie Dan, https://www.youtube.com/c/thenewbiewoodworker

View John G.'s profile

John G.

21 posts in 1745 days


#31 posted 09-28-2018 05:11 PM

I would just round the metric to the next whole number and not worry about tenths of a millimeter. Then tell your readers that you are doing that. Then tell them that they are free to adjust any of the dimensions to what works for their situation, and press on. A measuring system is just a set of numbers and relationships. There will always be differences between them.

There are lots of use cases where measuring to a specific number is immaterial. As an example, cutting a mortise. You can use a 13 mm chisel or a 1/2” chisel and be just as correct, because the best way to place the layout is through superimposition, anyway. Pick the chisel that works well with the width of the wood – without measuring. Set the mortise marking tool to the width of that chisel. Mark the wood for the mortise and for the tenon and make your cuts. Of course, that approach probably works better with unplugged hand tools than it does with machines. It’s a choice.

-- The next brick house on the left. Montgomery AL

View Dan Thomas's profile

Dan Thomas

160 posts in 536 days


#32 posted 09-28-2018 05:31 PM

You know, that’s not a bad idea (rounding to the next whole number and telling my readers that’s what I’m doing). It’s quick, for the most part, and nobody can say I didn’t provide metric versions.

Not sure what to do with bolts, but I can always say “approx. 6mm” or whatever, and let the user decide.

I may end up going with this. Thanks for the idea!

-- Newbie Dan, https://www.youtube.com/c/thenewbiewoodworker

View mudflap4869's profile

mudflap4869

1998 posts in 1998 days


#33 posted 09-28-2018 06:32 PM

In 1974 I bought a tape measure that has both imperial and metric readings on it. I rarely use the metric side, but it is handy for converting to imperial measurement. I haven’t seen another tape measure like it since I bought this one, but I think that all tapes should have this feature.

-- Still trying to master kindling making

View Dan Thomas's profile

Dan Thomas

160 posts in 536 days


#34 posted 09-28-2018 06:44 PM

That’s a good idea.

-- Newbie Dan, https://www.youtube.com/c/thenewbiewoodworker

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