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View WoodMag's profile

Which Sanding Method for Table Top

by WoodMag
posted 09-26-2018 04:54 PM


15 replies so far

View John Smith's profile

John Smith

1797 posts in 526 days


#1 posted 09-26-2018 05:01 PM

really nice piece of wood !!
how old is it ? how has it been stored ? has it been properly dried before you got it ?
my avenue of approach would be using the “less aggressive” methods first.
then, slowing moving up the ladder as required to obtain the finish you want.
then down to the bottom of the list with card or cabinet scrapers, 320 grit paper, etc.
oh – there is no truth to the rumor that “elbow grease” will stain raw wood !!!! (as in hand finishing).

.

.

-- Failure is proof that you at least tried ~ now, go do it again, and again, until you get it right --

View LittleShaver's profile

LittleShaver

527 posts in 983 days


#2 posted 09-26-2018 05:24 PM

I’m partial to a card or cabinet scraper. Not a fan of tailed dust and noise makers, unless there is some serious stock removal to be done that can’t be done with a plane or other quiet tool.

-- Sawdust Maker

View Rich's profile

Rich

4421 posts in 953 days


#3 posted 09-26-2018 05:33 PM

Don’t skip grits, particularly in the coarser starting grits. Get to 180 to 220 and then finish by hand sanding with the grain. The grain will hide such fine scratch marks and, as long as you sanded thoroughly at each grit leading up to it, there won’t be any random scratch marks.

Also, dye will not highlight scratches you may have left behind as much as stain will. Stain solids settle down in the scratches and they really show.

-- Knowledge is not skill. Knowledge plus ten thousand times is skill. -- Shinichi Suzuki

View pottz's profile

pottz

5037 posts in 1348 days


#4 posted 09-26-2018 05:34 PM

well if its really rough id start with my wide belt sander then id go to the ros and work down the grits,which i have no problem having swirl marks at all.the thought of smoothing a slab that big with a scraper just makes my arms sore,plus ive got better things to do.nice slab.

-- sawdust the bigger the pile the bigger my smile-larry,so cal.

View Madmark2's profile

Madmark2

452 posts in 952 days


#5 posted 09-26-2018 06:14 PM

Sanding opens the pores in the wood and will then take more stain and look darker. Using a scraper will not open the pores like a sander will and will absorb less stain.
Do not use a belt sander.

M

View WoodMag's profile

WoodMag

25 posts in 242 days


#6 posted 09-26-2018 06:37 PM

I’m not sure of the exact age of the piece but the planing mill said it has almost no sap (or they wouldn’t have taken the job) and it was “pretty dry”. The environment that I’m in has been 90-100 degrees for 5 months with no rain or moisture. Any piece (unless recently cut) is going to be pretty dry.

Would a orbital sander starting at 180 and moving through the grits to 320 be the best course? Perhaps finishing with a hand sand of 400?

View pottz's profile

pottz

5037 posts in 1348 days


#7 posted 09-26-2018 06:44 PM



I m not sure of the exact age of the piece but the planing mill said it has almost no sap (or they wouldn t have taken the job) and it was “pretty dry”. The environment that I m in has been 90-100 degrees for 5 months with no rain or moisture. Any piece (unless recently cut) is going to be pretty dry.

Would a orbital sander starting at 180 and moving through the grits to 320 be the best course? Perhaps finishing with a hand sand of 400?

- WoodMag

if the mill gave you a pretty smooth surface i would start at about 120 and go through the grits and finish at 400,you’ll end up with a nice finish,or wear your hands and arms out scraping-lol. ive been wood working for 50 years and this always works well for me,check my work if you want.

-- sawdust the bigger the pile the bigger my smile-larry,so cal.

View WoodMag's profile

WoodMag

25 posts in 242 days


#8 posted 09-26-2018 07:11 PM


if the mill gave you a pretty smooth surface i would start at about 120 and go through the grits and finish at 400,you ll end up with a nice finish,or wear your hands and arms out scraping-lol. ive been wood working for 50 years and this always works well for me,check my work if you want.

- pottz

Then use a Orbital starting at 120 ending with 320? Want to make sure that moving through grits will eliminate swirl marks. It’s pretty smooth with the exception of a few small corner areas where I’ll need some 60 grit and a belt sander to get it workable.

View pottz's profile

pottz

5037 posts in 1348 days


#9 posted 09-26-2018 07:21 PM

if the mill gave you a pretty smooth surface i would start at about 120 and go through the grits and finish at 400,you ll end up with a nice finish,or wear your hands and arms out scraping-lol. ive been wood working for 50 years and this always works well for me,check my work if you want.lumber jocks.

Then use a Orbital starting at 120 ending with 320? Want to make sure that moving through grits will eliminate swirl marks. It s pretty smooth with the exception of a few small corner areas where I ll need some 60 grit and a belt sander to get it workable.

- WoodMag

sounds good enjoy the process,thats gonna make a beautiful table,cant wait to see it finished.also welcome to lumber jocks.

-- sawdust the bigger the pile the bigger my smile-larry,so cal.

View WoodMag's profile

WoodMag

25 posts in 242 days


#10 posted 09-26-2018 07:33 PM

Thanks. I’m looking forward to it as well. This is my first table and working with this large/type of wood (done other projects) so I’m going to take it slow and make sure it’s done right.

View Rich's profile

Rich

4421 posts in 953 days


#11 posted 09-26-2018 08:09 PM


Sanding opens the pores in the wood and will then take more stain and look darker. Using a scraper will not open the pores like a sander will and will absorb less stain.
Do not use a belt sander.

- Madmark2

I’d be interested to see your source for this.

-- Knowledge is not skill. Knowledge plus ten thousand times is skill. -- Shinichi Suzuki

View WoodenDreams's profile

WoodenDreams

586 posts in 274 days


#12 posted 09-26-2018 08:16 PM

Use a belt sander with the grain, orbit, by hand is all personal preference. Wanting a super nice finish may be in your #grit sand paper you finalize in. Or are you finishing it off in epoxy.

View WoodMag's profile

WoodMag

25 posts in 242 days


#13 posted 09-26-2018 08:47 PM

I’m eventually going to go from 120 up to 400 grit on a random orbital hand sander.

I’ll take pictures and post as I go.

View Kirk650's profile

Kirk650

631 posts in 1112 days


#14 posted 09-26-2018 09:51 PM

Do not use a belt sander. Almost impossible to control the amount of wood removed. Start with a ROS to 320 and hand sand with the grain with 400 grit.

View pottz's profile

pottz

5037 posts in 1348 days


#15 posted 09-26-2018 10:05 PM



I m eventually going to go from 120 up to 400 grit on a random orbital hand sander.

I ll take pictures and post as I go.

- WoodMag

you’ll be fine,this aint rocket science,just sanding wood until its smooth,no need to over think it.

-- sawdust the bigger the pile the bigger my smile-larry,so cal.

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