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All Replies on Question about bolt holes on Craftsman Radial Arm saw front table build.

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View newparade's profile

Question about bolt holes on Craftsman Radial Arm saw front table build.

by newparade
posted 09-23-2018 12:50 PM


8 replies so far

View Bill White's profile

Bill White

5202 posts in 4325 days


#1 posted 09-23-2018 01:26 PM

The table set is relative to the fence. The blade should just clear the back of the fence, so the table should be set to allow that clearance. Kinda be a “work from the back side” design. Some RAS users will also swap the fence to the rear of the clearance board (the board to the rear of the fence) to allow for wider rip cuts.

-- [email protected]

View WhyMe's profile

WhyMe

1149 posts in 1926 days


#2 posted 09-23-2018 01:47 PM

I have that saw and the hole center is 1-3/8” from the back edge of the front top section.

View ocean's profile

ocean

158 posts in 1198 days


#3 posted 09-23-2018 02:37 PM

My father had that saw and I remember that there were holes in the frame below (4) that is the base of the saw. They were designed so that you could place all your bolts thru the top and then thru the hole in frame. Slots were wider on one end and narrow on the other end to catch the bolt head. You then tighten from above on the top to lock in place.

-- Bob, FL Keys

View newparade's profile

newparade

12 posts in 254 days


#4 posted 09-24-2018 04:53 AM

My sincere thanks to you guys.

-- Scott, Southern Illinois

View williamhdixon's profile

williamhdixon

15 posts in 595 days


#5 posted 04-04-2019 01:44 AM

If you haven’t finished with your table (I know, I’m probably too late), one way to make sure you have the rear edge of the table in the right spot is to rotate the motor into its ripping position. I forget which way is which (and I’m not in my shop right now), but the measuring strip across the arm is designed so that it shows the measurement of the rip (just above the carriage lock know in your diagram). So, set your saw to that position, and make sure that if the motor is at the 0” position the blade is sitting right at the edge of the fence. To put it another way, with the motor in that orientation and set to 1”, there should be exactly 1” between the fence and the blade. Assuming of course that everything is tuned to the original specs, which may not be the case with yours.

I hope that rambling makes some semblance of sense.

For what it’s worth, I am in the process of replacing my table and re-tuning everything. But I had replaced the feet with casters a few years ago, and everything was wobbly while I was cleaning it all up. (It’s amazing how small a space wasps and mud dobbers can squeeze into, and build nests). So I stopped the cleanup in order to build a mobile cart. It’s almost finished, then I’ll get back to the clean-up, tune-up, and table replacement.

Bill

View newparade's profile

newparade

12 posts in 254 days


#6 posted 04-04-2019 06:11 AM

Bill, thanks for the excellent suggestion. In retrospect what you just said seems so obvious, but it hadn’t occurred to me at all. As a matter of fact it wasn’t too late at all, as I’m just working on a second table. I made a steel reinforced Mr Sawdust style table, and the first one was just a hair off from being flat. I just made a second one and haven’t drilled the holes yet.

I agree on the mud dobbers!

-- Scott, Southern Illinois

View Bill Berklich's profile

Bill Berklich

761 posts in 753 days


#7 posted 04-04-2019 10:31 AM

I made a steel reinforced Mr Sawdust style table, and the first one was just a hair off from being flat. I just made a second one and haven t drilled the holes yet.

- newparade

Hey Scott – Any ideas/reasons your first one wasn’t flat? I’d like to avoid making the same mistake(s) :-)

-- Bill - Rochester MI

View newparade's profile

newparade

12 posts in 254 days


#8 posted 04-07-2019 03:56 AM


I made a steel reinforced Mr Sawdust style table, and the first one was just a hair off from being flat. I just made a second one and haven t drilled the holes yet.

- newparade

Hey Scott – Any ideas/reasons your first one wasn t flat? I d like to avoid making the same mistake(s) :-)

- Bill Berklich

What did me in was was being just a HAIR shallow on the cuts for the steel flats. It was close enough that even when I put it together dry, it looked just fine. What I didn’t realize was the clamps were applying just enough force to make it look fine. So in effect, I got this tiny slope toward the edge. I should have checked it with a straight edge front to back. I probably would have caught it before I glued up. To be honest, it may never have caused a problem, but I didn’t like the fact that I shimmed my sacrificial stock with tape to compensate. However I DID use the first table to cut the grooves in the new one, rather than route it and it was a faster, easier operation.

Also, and while this probably didn’t make much of a difference, I did my second glue-up on a granite counter top. I used the slowest setting marine epoxy I found at lowes.

-- Scott, Southern Illinois

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