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View groland's profile

Best way to rout stopped sliding dovetails

by groland
posted 09-22-2018 06:44 AM


22 replies so far

View GR8HUNTER's profile (online now)

GR8HUNTER

5682 posts in 1009 days


#1 posted 09-22-2018 02:10 PM

rout dovetails first then install Drawer fronts :<))

-- Tony---- Reinholds,Pa.------ REMEMBER TO ALWAYS HAVE FUN

View Rich's profile

Rich

4149 posts in 886 days


#2 posted 09-22-2018 02:18 PM

It’s easiest if you cut a stopped dado first, then cut the dovetail. That way there’s less material to remove. The sides are easy, just sneak up on your fit.

The tricky part will be that you are working on the narrow end of the drawer front and sides. You’ll need some way to stabilize the cut. Since I have no idea what tools you are using, I can’t help you there.

-- Half of what we read or hear about finishing is right. We just don’t know which half! — Bob Flexner

View waho6o9's profile

waho6o9

8593 posts in 2873 days


#3 posted 09-22-2018 02:26 PM

^ Yeppers

1-Dado

2-Dovetail

Whiteside router bits work well.

View BlasterStumps's profile

BlasterStumps

1228 posts in 736 days


#4 posted 09-22-2018 02:32 PM

When I do something like this, I do it on trial pieces that are the same dimensions as the piece that I want to use in the project. Test, test, test. You will find out quickly what works and what doesn’t.

-- "I build for function first, looks second. Most times I never get around to looks." - Mike, western Colorado

View bondogaposis's profile

bondogaposis

5252 posts in 2648 days


#5 posted 09-22-2018 02:45 PM

I’m not sure why you want to do this as they will be prone to sticking in humid weather, unless you make them really loose, which sort of defeats the purpose. A dado will work just as well and be a lot easier to fit. But if you have to do it, it is best done on a router table, hog out most of the waste with a straight bit, then clean up with a dovetail bit.

-- Bondo Gaposis

View Aj2's profile

Aj2

2052 posts in 2094 days


#6 posted 09-22-2018 05:09 PM

You can add the slide below the drawer bottom or if you like to challenge yourself incorporate it with the drawer bottom. Either way pick your wood carefully if you get too much warping the sliding action is sticky like Bondo mentions.
I find drawer making very rewarding but I hardly ever get to do it.

-- Aj

View Rich's profile

Rich

4149 posts in 886 days


#7 posted 09-22-2018 05:26 PM

Aj, Bondo, I think he’s referring to using sliding dovetails to attach the drawer fronts to the sides, not as drawer slides.

-- Half of what we read or hear about finishing is right. We just don’t know which half! — Bob Flexner

View AlaskaGuy's profile

AlaskaGuy

5107 posts in 2605 days


#8 posted 09-22-2018 05:55 PM


Aj, Bondo, I think he s referring to using sliding dovetails to attach the drawer fronts to the sides, not as drawer slides.

- Rich

That’s what I think also. Used to be a common what to attach factory made drawer fronts. Still might be haven’t noticed in a long time. Not sure but it seems like that method was used of the contractor grade cabinets. I’m sure Youtube will have a video of this.

https://www.youtube.com/results?search_query=sliding+stopped+dovetails+for+drawer+fronts

-- Alaskan's for Global warming!

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AlaskaGuy

5107 posts in 2605 days


#9 posted 09-22-2018 06:08 PM

Didn’t find a really good video (yet anyway) but I found this. +1 on what Rich said too.

https://www.wwgoa.com/article/making-sliding-dovetails/

-- Alaskan's for Global warming!

View 000's profile

000

2859 posts in 1195 days


#10 posted 09-22-2018 06:36 PM

I use my panel router. Makes quick work on rights or lefts, just set the stops and go.

You could easily make a router sled that your router slides on, and move your front from side to side.

View Aj2's profile

Aj2

2052 posts in 2094 days


#11 posted 09-22-2018 07:54 PM

Thanks Rich your right. Why someone would want to do that is beyond me. I’m stepping out of this thread…..

-- Aj

View WoodenDreams's profile

WoodenDreams

499 posts in 207 days


#12 posted 09-22-2018 08:04 PM

Have you thought of dado cutting the slides and wax the sliding surface. It’s just easier than dovetailing the slides. Less worry of expansion and binding. If your thinking dovetail on the drawer face, great and looks nice, but more work. Finger joints easier and There are router bits for drawer joints using with a router table.

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000

2859 posts in 1195 days


#13 posted 09-22-2018 09:49 PM

View Rich's profile

Rich

4149 posts in 886 days


#14 posted 09-22-2018 10:01 PM

What? Not animated?


- jbay


-- Half of what we read or hear about finishing is right. We just don’t know which half! — Bob Flexner

View AlaskaGuy's profile

AlaskaGuy

5107 posts in 2605 days


#15 posted 09-22-2018 10:13 PM



Thanks Rich your right. Why someone would want to do that is beyond me. I’m stepping out of this thread…..

- Aj2

Agree with that.

-- Alaskan's for Global warming!

View Rich's profile

Rich

4149 posts in 886 days


#16 posted 09-22-2018 10:27 PM


Thanks Rich your right. Why someone would want to do that is beyond me. I’m stepping out of this thread…..

- Aj2

Agree with that.

- AlaskaGuy

I can see where someone might want that look. It would allow you to have an overlay drawer front directly attached to the sides (not a false front) without messing with a rabbeted half-blind dovetail. Additionally, the full thickness of the drawer front would be maintained, unlike the rabbeted version. Depending on your cabinet design it could complement full overlay doors nicely.

-- Half of what we read or hear about finishing is right. We just don’t know which half! — Bob Flexner

View groland's profile

groland

212 posts in 3708 days


#17 posted 09-23-2018 05:23 PM

Thanks, AlaskaGuy, you have understood exactly what I want to do and the link you provided:
https://www.wwgoa.com/article/making-sliding-dovetails/
is perfect.

Thank you very much.

I am planning to use metal drawer glides, so the drawer sides have to be 1/2 inch in from the edge of the drawer front.

This link shows how to do through and stopped versions. Perfect!

Thanks again!

View Kirk650's profile

Kirk650

598 posts in 1045 days


#18 posted 09-24-2018 02:22 AM

I also appreciate that link on making sliding dovetails on the router table. I admit that I was racking my brain as to how to do the stopped version without the ‘keyhole’, when it turns out that the keyhole isn’t visible. I shoulda figured that out.

View Nubsnstubs's profile

Nubsnstubs

1480 posts in 2026 days


#19 posted 09-24-2018 03:04 AM

I’ve been making 5 piece drawers since ‘78. I hate add on fronts. I do have an overarm router and a bunch of jig/fixtures to aid in what I’m trying to accomplish. I even route the groove for the drawer bottoms using my Pin Router.

To those that believe sliding dovetails might bind, my thoughts on that are, “It is good that they do end up binding”. With the glue and a little snug fit, binding is very appropriate.

Below is a picture of a jig Jbay posted. What I don’t see is an indexing stop for the drawer front edge. Easy enough after you get the distance from the edge of the drawer front to the outside edge of the drawer side. Do one side only on all fronts, and when done, set up the block at the same distance for the other side. Rout all, then route the bottom groove.

Another thing not shown and needed on the jig is something to hold the front securely while routing the dovetails. De Sta Co is a manufacturer of Toggle Clamps??. I’ve only known them as De Sta Co clamps, but I see them in woodworking links and books. Easily available.

The stop you were asking about to keep you from punching out the top edge is shown in the picture. After making a jig like this, and you find you want a shorter dovetail, just cut some pieces of wood to take up the additional stop. If you find you didn’t allow for enough dovetail length, remove the larger stop and cut it narrower and reinsert. there are a couple other ways of doing the dovetail lengths, but I’m tooo slow at typing to try explaining it. If you go the route of using this jig, you will discover it’s a pretty good set up.

For doing the drawer sides, I had a blade made up that I use on my table saw. Pretty nifty…......... Jerry (in Tucson)

You could easily make a router sled that your router slides on, and move your front from side to side.

- jbay


-- Jerry (in Tucson) www.woodturnerstools.com

View 000's profile

000

2859 posts in 1195 days


#20 posted 09-24-2018 03:21 AM

The picture is only conceptual, there are lots of things missing. :)

Below is a picture of a jig Jbay posted. What I don t see is an indexing stop for the drawer front edge. Easy enough after you get the distance from the edge of the drawer front to the outside edge of the drawer side. Do one side only on all fronts, and when done, set up the block at the same distance for the other side. Rout all, then route the bottom groove.

Another thing not shown and needed on the jig is something to hold the front securely while routing the dovetails. De Sta Co is a manufacturer of Toggle Clamps??. I ve only known them as De Sta Co clamps, but I see them in woodworking links and books. Easily available.

Jerry (in Tucson)

- jbay

- Nubsnstubs


View Rich's profile

Rich

4149 posts in 886 days


#21 posted 09-24-2018 03:48 AM


The picture is only conceptual, there are lots of things missing. :)

- jbay

Yeah. Like animation.

-- Half of what we read or hear about finishing is right. We just don’t know which half! — Bob Flexner

View 000's profile

000

2859 posts in 1195 days


#22 posted 09-24-2018 04:18 AM

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