LumberJocks

All Replies on Update: Glueing joinery without clamps (failure photo)

  • Advertise with us
View shipwright's profile

Update: Glueing joinery without clamps (failure photo)

by shipwright
posted 09-19-2018 01:56 PM


49 replies so far

View Joe Lyddon's profile

Joe Lyddon

10600 posts in 4437 days


#1 posted 09-19-2018 02:16 PM

Very impressive and interesting…

I also remember your posts on using Hide glue…

Thank you for this Link… Very good!

-- Have Fun! Joe Lyddon - Alta Loma, CA USA - Home: http://www.WoodworkStuff.net ... My Small Gallery: http://www.ncwoodworker.net/pp/showgallery.php?ppuser=1389&cat=500"

View Dutchy's profile

Dutchy

3384 posts in 2553 days


#2 posted 09-19-2018 02:37 PM

Thanks for the link.

-- https://dutchypatterns.com/

View JADobson's profile

JADobson

1439 posts in 2496 days


#3 posted 09-19-2018 02:56 PM

Bought some veneers last week, building a veneer hammer this week and then going to teach myself to use hide glue next week to hammer veneer. Wish me luck.

-- No craft is very far from the line beyond which is magic. -- Lord Dunsany — Instagram @grailwoodworks

View madts's profile

madts

1901 posts in 2724 days


#4 posted 09-19-2018 04:02 PM

Cool stuff.

—Madts.

-- Thor and Odin are still the greatest of Gods.

View Jerry's profile

Jerry

3174 posts in 2033 days


#5 posted 09-19-2018 06:10 PM

Paul, I’ve recently had a conversation with my friend Ernie Searing about this, and we both agree that not only is clamping unnecessary, but that in most cases, even with an edge joint, that devices such as biscuits, dowels, dominos, etc. are also superfluous, with the exception of gluing end grain together such as in a miter joint, but even in that situation, the case could be made that if you sealed the end grain with a thin layer of glue and let it dry, that the second application would bind it sufficiently

Coincidentally I’ve switched over to using hide glue in most applications with the exception of joints that will be exposed to lots of moisture or high heat.

I find it to be as strong as the polyurethane glues to any reasonable point, IE, the wood will break before the joint will. It has the added advantage of being reversible for repairs, it’s more forgiving in terms of slower set up time before grabbing.

Thanks for the post, most interesting!

-- There are good ships and there are wood ships, the ships that sail the sea, but the best ships are friendships and may they always be. http://www.geraldlhunsucker.com/

View Schwieb's profile

Schwieb

1888 posts in 3846 days


#6 posted 09-19-2018 07:34 PM

Interesting for sure. Old habits are hard to break and It would be hard for me to not rely on clamps in some situations but I do see that it is possible to apply too much pressure. I have used hide glue some but again just reaching for a bottle of Titebond for the convenience and expedience is hard to get away from.

On a side note, awhile back I began to notice this really nasty smell in the shop and realized that I had left some hide glue in the pot and it went bad. That was fun to clean up.

-- Dr. Ken, Florida - Durch harte arbeit werden Träume wahr.

View jdh122's profile

jdh122

1073 posts in 3202 days


#7 posted 09-19-2018 08:14 PM

Thanks for the video. As I understand it, a rub joint is just as effective with PVA glue as it is with hide glue (although the immediate tack will probably be less).

-- Jeremy, in the Acadian forests

View Lazyman's profile

Lazyman

3383 posts in 1772 days


#8 posted 09-19-2018 09:46 PM

I tried a rub joint on 2 piece at right angles when I first started experimenting with HHG a couple of years ago in preparation for a hammer veneering project. You can see the test joint in this blog. I stumbled upon the test piece in my scrap bin a couple months ago and tried to break the joint and even using a vice grip to get more leverage I still I could not get it to break. Pretty amazing stuff.

-- Nathan, TX -- Hire the lazy man. He may not do as much work but that's because he will find a better way.

View ArtMann's profile

ArtMann

1381 posts in 1201 days


#9 posted 09-19-2018 10:14 PM

Double post.

View ArtMann's profile

ArtMann

1381 posts in 1201 days


#10 posted 09-19-2018 10:16 PM

The video would have been more worthwhile if the guy had waited for the glue to cure and then put the piece in a vise and broke it apart. Properly clamped PVA glue will not break at the joint. I don’t know about this demonstration. He could have done the same demo with hot melt glue and we all know how strong that is.

View lumbering_on's profile

lumbering_on

578 posts in 875 days


#11 posted 09-19-2018 10:27 PM


The video would have been more worthwhile if the guy had waited for the glue to dry and then put the piece in a vise and broke it apart. Properly clamped PVA glue will not break at the joint. I don t know about this demonstration. He could have done the same demo with hot melt glue and we all know how strong that is.

- ArtMann

+1

In addition, the open time of hide is often times a real pain. I usually use aliphatic glue, but sometimes I need the open time you get with a PVA. I shudder to think about what I’d do if hide glue were the only option; probably give up woodworking.

View Woodwrecker's profile

Woodwrecker

4220 posts in 3960 days


#12 posted 09-19-2018 11:56 PM

Well, I’ve already bought the clamps, biscuits and everything else…lol
I have used hide glue and like it for it’s open time and having the ability to be released.
Thank you for the post. That guy has a pretty cool channel.

View GR8HUNTER's profile

GR8HUNTER

6061 posts in 1097 days


#13 posted 09-20-2018 12:53 AM

I remember Brian doing this with regular glue I mean the sliding thing but cant remember what video it was :<))

-- Tony---- Reinholds,Pa.------ REMEMBER TO ALWAYS HAVE FUN

View squazo's profile

squazo

124 posts in 2030 days


#14 posted 09-20-2018 12:56 AM

when I use construction adhesive I usually use it because I cannot clamp and I don’t want fasteners exposed, it works great with that stuff. I’ve had good results with wood glue as well.

View shipwright's profile

shipwright

8305 posts in 3182 days


#15 posted 09-20-2018 05:15 AM



The video would have been more worthwhile if the guy had waited for the glue to cure and then put the piece in a vise and broke it apart. Properly clamped PVA glue will not break at the joint. I don t know about this demonstration. He could have done the same demo with hot melt glue and we all know how strong that is.

- ArtMann


It would not have broken on the glue line. Trust me. This joint has held furniture together to this day that was built for Louis XIV. I know of no 250 + year trials of pieces done with pva glue and clamps. This is not to say that the pva won’t last 200 years, only that HHG can.

-- Paul M ..............the early bird may get the worm but it’s the second mouse that gets the cheese! http://thecanadianschooloffrenchmarquetry.com/

View TopamaxSurvivor's profile

TopamaxSurvivor

18564 posts in 4060 days


#16 posted 09-20-2018 06:45 AM

Thanks for the link.

-- Bob in WW ~ "some old things are lovely, warm still with life ... of the forgotten men who made them." - D.H. Lawrence

View Lazyman's profile

Lazyman

3383 posts in 1772 days


#17 posted 09-20-2018 01:15 PM

PVA joints might last 200 years but it is also likely to experience creep. For day to day usage, PVA is fine but if the goal is to make furniture that lasts, HHG Is what I would choose.

-- Nathan, TX -- Hire the lazy man. He may not do as much work but that's because he will find a better way.

View lumbering_on's profile

lumbering_on

578 posts in 875 days


#18 posted 09-20-2018 04:23 PM


It would not have broken on the glue line. Trust me. This joint has held furniture together to this day that was built for Louis XIV. I know of no 250 + year trials of pieces done with pva glue and clamps. This is not to say that the pva won’t last 200 years, only that HHG can.

- shipwright

Although I agree that hide glue can last a long time, I’ve also been around antiques where they’ve broken and it was always at the glue joint. Hide glue doesn’t cause wood failure as PVA and aliphatic glues due. In fact, I used to work with someone who restored old furniture as a hobby and he loved how joints with hide glue could be easily dismantled with a sharp blow with a rubber mallet.

View ArtMann's profile

ArtMann

1381 posts in 1201 days


#19 posted 09-20-2018 09:40 PM

Are you saying that you know furniture built for Louis XIV was not constructed using clamps? That is the point at issue here. We all know hide glue works okay under the right circumstances. The failure to use clamps is where I take issue with the video.

The video would have been more worthwhile if the guy had waited for the glue to cure and then put the piece in a vise and broke it apart. Properly clamped PVA glue will not break at the joint. I don t know about this demonstration. He could have done the same demo with hot melt glue and we all know how strong that is.

- ArtMann

It would not have broken on the glue line. Trust me. This joint has held furniture together to this day that was built for Louis XIV. I know of no 250 + year trials of pieces done with pva glue and clamps. This is not to say that the pva won’t last 200 years, only that HHG can.

- shipwright


View lumbering_on's profile

lumbering_on

578 posts in 875 days


#20 posted 09-20-2018 10:13 PM


Are you saying that you know furniture built for Louis XIV was not constructed using clamps? That is the point at issue here. We all know hide glue works okay under the right circumstances. The failure to use clamps is where I take issue with the video.

- ArtMann

It occured to me after reading this again that this is what known as ‘survivor bias’. There are certainly some very old pieces of furniture around, but just as certain, only an incredibly tiny amount of the furniture made during that era is around. In fact, it’s just about non existent, which is why it’s so valuable. Think about how hard it would be to find even so much as a chair or table made in the year 1900, let alone 1700. Although, millions would have been produced.

It’s just like how you hear someone tell you that they don’t make X like they used to because they know one or two people that had one for decades. This ignores the fact that this may be one or two out of tens of millions. It also ignores the fact that all major purchases, including furniture were repaired, while these days we just tend to throw a lot of these things out.

View shipwright's profile

shipwright

8305 posts in 3182 days


#21 posted 09-21-2018 12:03 AM



Are you saying that you know furniture built for Louis XIV was not constructed using clamps? That is the point at issue here. We all know hide glue works okay under the right circumstances. The failure to use clamps is where I take issue with the video.

Yes.

-- Paul M ..............the early bird may get the worm but it’s the second mouse that gets the cheese! http://thecanadianschooloffrenchmarquetry.com/

View Nubsnstubs's profile

Nubsnstubs

1553 posts in 2115 days


#22 posted 09-21-2018 01:10 AM

King Tut had a stool or something to that effect entombed with him, plus boxes and other wood stuff. It’s still in good shape today. Don’t know what they used to keep these items together, whether it was glue or just a good fit. If they did use clamps, I pretty sure it would have been 2 slaves apposing each other pulling as hard as they could for several hours until the glue set.

Hey, how about using rawhide for a clamp. I’ve used old bicycle tubes to clamp round table top edgings before. These people in the past were not isolated from figuring how to do things. In fact, they invented the sharpest cutting instrument know to man today. With all our modern technology using highly educated engineers and modern materials, we still have to go back to technology invented tens of thousands of years ago to duplicate it. We today are doing it a lot easier than the ancients, who actually started the ball rolling with what they had, and all we have done is just expanded on what they started. They had their ways of doing things that got us to where we are today. ............ Jerry (in Tucson)

-- Jerry (in Tucson) www.woodturnerstools.com

View rance's profile

rance

4271 posts in 3545 days


#23 posted 09-21-2018 04:58 AM

I so want to use HHG but can’t get past the heating time and the ease at which I can grab a glue bottle and quickly dispense a little or a lot, and it is done. I’m not closing the book on HHG though. :) Thanks for sharing Paul.

-- Backer boards, stop blocks, build oversized, and never buy a hand plane--

View Tony_S's profile

Tony_S

970 posts in 3468 days


#24 posted 09-21-2018 09:44 AM


Trust me.

- shipwright

From one warrior to another…without question.
Not too many I can say that about….

-- It is the mark of an educated mind to be able to entertain a thought without accepting it. Aristotle

View Joe Lyddon's profile

Joe Lyddon

10600 posts in 4437 days


#25 posted 09-21-2018 01:49 PM

Using an average glue can, how long does it take to Heat-up the glue?

... from very start, new flakes?

... from already present glue?

You can leave the old glue in the pot, I presume… and just add to it or heat it up whenever you need it?

-- Have Fun! Joe Lyddon - Alta Loma, CA USA - Home: http://www.WoodworkStuff.net ... My Small Gallery: http://www.ncwoodworker.net/pp/showgallery.php?ppuser=1389&cat=500"

View jdh122's profile

jdh122

1073 posts in 3202 days


#26 posted 09-21-2018 02:49 PM

Here’s a description on how to edge-glue boards from Nicholson’s Mechanic’s Companion, from the middle of the 19th century. No mention of clamps at all.
P. 137 in http://www.woodworkslibrary.com/repository/mechanics_companion.pdf
(after shooting the boards straight): spread the edges over with strong thin glue… one of the boards being fixed… then turn the loose board upon the fixed board, applying the edges that are shot together, rub the upper board backwards and forwards until the two begin to stick fast, and the glue mostly rubbed out; the faces must be brought as nearly straight as possible.

-- Jeremy, in the Acadian forests

View shipwright's profile

shipwright

8305 posts in 3182 days


#27 posted 09-21-2018 10:03 PM

Joe, from granulated glue to hot ready to use, maybe half an hour depending on the quantity and the glue pot.
Ten minutes less for reheating yesterday’s glue. These are rough guesses. I never checked. When I go to the shop I plug the glue in. By the time I’m ready to use it it’s always ready.
If you use it regularly as I do, heating time is never an issue. It’s always there.

My glue pot goes in the fridge at night and comes out in the morning. I add more when it gets low.

-- Paul M ..............the early bird may get the worm but it’s the second mouse that gets the cheese! http://thecanadianschooloffrenchmarquetry.com/

View runswithscissors's profile

runswithscissors

3034 posts in 2410 days


#28 posted 09-22-2018 01:23 AM

It should be mentioned that, absent perfectly fitting joints, most glues are not gap filling. Certainly not the old urea glues like Weldwood, nor resorcinol. They both call for perfectly fitting joints. I don’t think the Titebond glues are gap filling. I know that epoxy is an excellent gap filler (if you can stop it from running out of the joint—one of the reasons for thickening it with wood flour, etc.). I don’t know about Gorilla Glue and it’s ilk. I wonder about hide glue. Can anyone enlighten me?

-- I admit to being an adrenaline junky; fortunately, I'm very easily frightened

View shipwright's profile

shipwright

8305 posts in 3182 days


#29 posted 09-22-2018 02:32 AM

Yes, hide glues are not gap fillers. As you note not many glues are except epoxies
That is why we strive for good joinery.

-- Paul M ..............the early bird may get the worm but it’s the second mouse that gets the cheese! http://thecanadianschooloffrenchmarquetry.com/

View Lazyman's profile

Lazyman

3383 posts in 1772 days


#30 posted 09-22-2018 03:06 AM



I so want to use HHG but can t get past the heating time and the ease at which I can grab a glue bottle and quickly dispense a little or a lot, and it is done. I m not closing the book on HHG though. :) Thanks for sharing Paul.

- rance

For occasional use, a liquid hide glue like Old Brown Glue can be a handy for quick glue-ups where you don’t need much glue . OBG is really nice for tight fitting joints because it sort of acts like a lubricant until it starts to dry. I keep in my shop/beer fridge to extend its shelf life and drop it in a warm glass of water while am doing my dry fit.

If you are doing a major glue up, it really isn’t that big of a deal to mix and heat up a new batch of the traditional stuff. You can prepare it in advance and keep it in the fridge for several weeks until you are ready to use it. If you want to give HHG a try without investing in an expensive glue pot, I found that some of the plastic bottles that spices come in work pretty well for preparing and even heating small batches of HHG in a water bath. You can use a small crock pot with a temperature control to heat some water and simply put the spice bottle of glue in the water. Use a candy or meat thermometer to monitor the tempature and don’t let it go above 160°. If you have glue left, simply put the cap back on and put it in the fridge. Note that if you know you won’t use it for a while, you can simple pour it out on a sheet of plastic and let it set and dry for a couple of days into a hard sheet. When you are ready to use it again, just crush it back up into small pieces and rewet just like a fresh batch.

-- Nathan, TX -- Hire the lazy man. He may not do as much work but that's because he will find a better way.

View shipwright's profile

shipwright

8305 posts in 3182 days


#31 posted 09-23-2018 04:25 PM

Artman, I added a photo for you. Sorry I can’t break the joint shown in the video but it shows a couple I did a few years ago as a test. It’s stronger than the wood. That’s all that matters to me.

-- Paul M ..............the early bird may get the worm but it’s the second mouse that gets the cheese! http://thecanadianschooloffrenchmarquetry.com/

View TheFridge's profile

TheFridge

10858 posts in 1871 days


#32 posted 09-23-2018 05:07 PM


I so want to use HHG but can t get past the heating time and the ease at which I can grab a glue bottle and quickly dispense a little or a lot, and it is done. I m not closing the book on HHG though. :) Thanks for sharing Paul.

- rance

I keep mine in the deep freeze outside because the wife doesn’t want it in the fridge. It takes about 15 mins to heat up to temp. I just grab on the way to the shop and usually by the time I’m settled and finish planning how I’m gonna do what, it’s ready.

If I need more I just add a lil water and granules and stir. Usually good to go in a bout 5 minutes. I am noticing it’s stickier after repeated freeze and thaw cycles and not as easy to clean but it still does everything it’s supposed to.

It’s not uncommon for me to glue something up and do some planing or scraping on it shortly after. So in some some instances, patience can sometimes accommodate impatience:)

-- Shooting down the walls of heartache. Bang bang. I am. The warrior.

View shipwright's profile

shipwright

8305 posts in 3182 days


#33 posted 09-23-2018 08:30 PM


It’s not uncommon for me to glue something up and do some planing or scraping on it shortly after. So in some some instances, patience can sometimes accommodate impatience:)

- TheFridge

Love it! Great turn of phrase.

I’m sure it works the way you are doing it but really you should hydrate the granules before adding them to the mix.
.. just a thought.

-- Paul M ..............the early bird may get the worm but it’s the second mouse that gets the cheese! http://thecanadianschooloffrenchmarquetry.com/

View TheFridge's profile

TheFridge

10858 posts in 1871 days


#34 posted 09-24-2018 04:54 AM

I know. I was kinda surprised at how fast they incorporated though. I was in a bind and thought it would come out lumpy. Would much rather be prepared, but for small drawer sides and the like I was willing to wing it and deal with the consequences later :)

I wouldn’t risk it With the work you do Paul. Way too many parts.

-- Shooting down the walls of heartache. Bang bang. I am. The warrior.

View ArtMann's profile

ArtMann

1381 posts in 1201 days


#35 posted 09-24-2018 01:27 PM

If you will check, you will see that I never claimed zero clamping pressure using Hide glue wasn’t effective. All I said was that the video of the guy doing it didn’t prove anything because there was no test and evaluation. I have done extensive testing on joints using PVA glue in the past and I know how it behaves. I have never seen a similar test on hide glue until your edited post with the picture. I won’t use hide glue because I am unwilling to deal with the melting pot, regardless of strength.

Artman, I added a photo for you. Sorry I can’t break the joint shown in the video but it shows a couple I did a few years ago as a test. It’s stronger than the wood. That’s all that matters to me.

- shipwright


View johnstoneb's profile

johnstoneb

3107 posts in 2557 days


#36 posted 09-24-2018 01:37 PM

Thanks Paul, I wanted to see some failures. I haven’t used HHG yet but have used titebond hide glue and like using it. I have had to reverse it a couple of times with heat that is convenient. I recently repaired an old small cabinet for a friend It was probably a hundred years old so figured it was probably hide glue a little heat the parts came loose did the repairs and reglued with hide glue. You couldn’t see the repair and the friend was ecstatic.

-- Bruce, Boise, ID

View DrDirt's profile

DrDirt

4555 posts in 4127 days


#37 posted 09-24-2018 02:43 PM

Hey Paul –
I heard that HHG is “Better” after it has been cooking a week or so, and has gotten more to a weak coffee color.

Understand the hydrating side, and warming it up… but I always thought that the darkening was more oxidation/cooking the proteins.
Heard this from Patrick Edwards, when he discussed protein glues on a Sunday, and he had made up fresh glue… but was saying it would be “better later in the week”.

Has this been your experience? I never saw a difference myself for any failures, but never ran a controlled old vs new test.

-- “The two most important days in your life are the day you are born and the day you find out why.” Mark Twain

View shipwright's profile

shipwright

8305 posts in 3182 days


#38 posted 09-24-2018 02:43 PM



I know. I was kinda surprised at how fast they incorporated though. I was in a bind and thought it would come out lumpy. Would much rather be prepared, but for small drawer sides and the like I was willing to wing it and deal with the consequences later :)

I wouldn’t risk it With the work you do Paul. Way too many parts.

- TheFridge


This is organic stuff and pretty forgiving. You really should add hot water when it becomes too thick but I have never had problems thinning with cold water. (I don’t have hot water in my shop) I’m sure it’s the same way with small quantities of dry crystals.

-- Paul M ..............the early bird may get the worm but it’s the second mouse that gets the cheese! http://thecanadianschooloffrenchmarquetry.com/

View TheFridge's profile

TheFridge

10858 posts in 1871 days


#39 posted 09-24-2018 03:57 PM

I have a spray bottle handy for sharpening so I go with it.

I love a fresh batch of glue. I’ve found the squeeze out to be much much easier to clean and the older it is the tackier it is. In my limited experience.

-- Shooting down the walls of heartache. Bang bang. I am. The warrior.

View lumbering_on's profile

lumbering_on

578 posts in 875 days


#40 posted 09-24-2018 04:20 PM

As an engineer, I really try to find lab conducted experiments whenever possible.

http://www.wag-aic.org/1990/WAG_90_buck.pdf

tldr – hide glues (liquid and hot) have good strength at low RH, but this rapidly drops at the RH increases. At 84% RH, which is quite common in many areas, the strength of hide glues drops precipitously, and produced a mere 2% wood failure – i.e. the glue failed 98% of the time at this RH.

This squares with what I’ve seen with old furniture I grew up with in the 70’s that would fail with no damage to the wood.

Don’t get me wrong. I’ve used hide glue, both hot and liquid, and they have their place in woodworking. There is certainly benefits to it in terms of repairability, the high tact, and the fact that it doesn’t interfere with the finish, and clean up is a breeze. It’s just not a panacea for every glue-up.

View AlaskaGuy's profile

AlaskaGuy

5271 posts in 2694 days


#41 posted 09-24-2018 04:22 PM

Looks like you have very little open time. Can the open times be manipulated at all? From what I see in the video the hot hide glue sets to fast for many applications.

-- Alaskan's for Global warming!

View Ocelot's profile

Ocelot

2229 posts in 3023 days


#42 posted 09-24-2018 04:59 PM

Thanks to lumbering_on for the scientific test report. I briefly read over it. That’s the sort of thing I also like to see.

It was interesting that the study concluded that hot hide glue performed much better than liquid hide glue in the highest-humidity test – after the joint was kept in an environment of 86% humidity 24/7 for 36 days.

”Under normal conditions of 50% RH and room temperature liquid hide glue provides the strongest bond. However, hot hide glue proved to be the more stable of the two glues under extreme conditions of high heat or high humidity, and thus would be the more desirable choice if fluctuating environmental conditions are anticipated.”

I personally think that it would be very rare for furniture in a home to be exposed to 86% humidity 24/7 for 36 days. That might be true however in a non-climate-controlled beach house – but even there it is doubtful. So, I think that high-humidity test was a little extreme.

I haven’t yet tried hide glue but it’s on my list of things to try.

-Paul

View lumbering_on's profile

lumbering_on

578 posts in 875 days


#43 posted 09-24-2018 05:11 PM

Ocelot, I wouldn’t say it’s extreme at all. Engineering tests are often done using conditions that seem extreme, but are required to compress the time frame needed to obtain your results. Although, it’s not likely that the humidity would be that high on a continuous basis, it’s almost certain that you will experiencing periods of high humidity over years.

Old furniture fails at the glue all the time. I would imagine everyone has seen dowels pop out of arms or legs of a chair, and I’ve seen the backs of press back chairs come loose many times. This wasn’t the result of extreme humidity over a week, it was due to years of changes in RH and temperature.

View TheFridge's profile

TheFridge

10858 posts in 1871 days


#44 posted 09-24-2018 07:26 PM

Or because some fatass sat in the chair.

-- Shooting down the walls of heartache. Bang bang. I am. The warrior.

View lumbering_on's profile

lumbering_on

578 posts in 875 days


#45 posted 09-24-2018 10:44 PM



Or because some fatass sat in the chair.

- TheFridge

Maybe, if it was Alder it would be ok. ;-)

View TheFridge's profile

TheFridge

10858 posts in 1871 days


#46 posted 09-24-2018 11:35 PM

You smell what I’m stepping in :)

-- Shooting down the walls of heartache. Bang bang. I am. The warrior.

View Lazyman's profile

Lazyman

3383 posts in 1772 days


#47 posted 09-25-2018 02:07 AM

Ha! When these topics drift into discussions about whether the wood fails before the glue joint, I always chuckle and wonder what you guys are doing to your furniture where that is even a consideration. If that becomes a concern, then wood might not be the best choice in the material. Is there a forum for welding?

Regardless, If it is going to fail, I think that I would want the glue to fail before the wood does anyway. It is a lot easier to fix a broken glue joint, especially a hide glue joint, than to repair something where the wood failed.

-- Nathan, TX -- Hire the lazy man. He may not do as much work but that's because he will find a better way.

View TheFridge's profile

TheFridge

10858 posts in 1871 days


#48 posted 09-25-2018 02:16 AM

Ease of use is probably the biggest negative but man it has a bunch of positives. I love the stuff.

I even enjoy the animally smell of hooves and random parts :)

-- Shooting down the walls of heartache. Bang bang. I am. The warrior.

View DrDirt's profile

DrDirt

4555 posts in 4127 days


#49 posted 09-26-2018 09:07 PM

This was an amusing summary – comparing Yellow Glue, Epoxy and Hide Glue (old brown glue premix)
https://www.core77.com/posts/79789/Tools-n-Craft-106-Which-Glue-is-Better-Epoxy-Yellow-Wood-Glue-or-Liquid-Hide-Glue

To test this characteristic of glue we needed a type of joint where joint members, even when pinned down, shift position all the time.

Members of Congress seemed perfect for the test.

Epoxy – The representative was still seated and had not shifted his position.

Elmer’s Wood Glue – The representative was disqualified when it was discovered that he had no positions on anything and voted on strict donor lines.

Old Brown Liquid Hide Glue – The representative was solidly attached but under the heat of public scrutiny the glue softened and the representative was able to shift position. Fortunately one characteristic of hide glue is that it’s reversible and a lobbyist was able to bring the representative back to his original position with little effort.

Conclusion: Epoxy is the way to go if you have the votes going in. Otherwise use hide glue.

-- “The two most important days in your life are the day you are born and the day you find out why.” Mark Twain

Have your say...

You must be signed in to reply.

DISCLAIMER: Any posts on LJ are posted by individuals acting in their own right and do not necessarily reflect the views of LJ. LJ will not be held liable for the actions of any user.

Latest Projects | Latest Blog Entries | Latest Forum Topics

HomeRefurbers.com