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How to Repair bowed 2 x 4 Frame

by FamilyMentors
posted 09-17-2018 12:08 AM


12 replies so far

View lumbering_on's profile

lumbering_on

578 posts in 877 days


#1 posted 09-17-2018 12:39 AM

That’s one huge warp in the frame. There’s no way I can see 1/4” plywood holding this straight, unless it’s a sub-floor.

Did you glue it or are you just using the pocket screws? If it’s just the screws, the easiest way would be to remove the screws and see if you can adjust it to be flat. Other than that, I’d just throw it out and start again. IMHO, it’s not worth the effort to try anything elaborate to save a simple game frame.

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FamilyMentors

8 posts in 348 days


#2 posted 09-17-2018 12:53 AM

Unfortunately, glued. Guess I could get thicker plywood… or start over. 2×4s were salvaged from a neighbor’s yard barn. Free can be costly sometimes. :-)

View Rayne's profile

Rayne

1206 posts in 1926 days


#3 posted 09-17-2018 12:54 AM

Would creating a torsion type bracing inside force it to stay flat? Just an idea.

View lumbering_on's profile

lumbering_on

578 posts in 877 days


#4 posted 09-17-2018 01:53 AM



Unfortunately, glued. Guess I could get thicker plywood… or start over. 2×4s were salvaged from a neighbor’s yard barn. Free can be costly sometimes. :-)

- FamilyMentors

Sometimes, free is the most expensive thing you can get. ;)

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therealSteveN

2802 posts in 961 days


#5 posted 09-17-2018 02:00 AM

What did the wood look like to start with? If it was flat and true I’d unscrew the pocket screws, and measure your lengths again.

If it was your average found in the yard 2×4’s it’s likely they were like a dogs hind leg, but they look pretty clean??

-- Think safe, be safe

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FamilyMentors

8 posts in 348 days


#6 posted 09-17-2018 02:10 AM



Would creating a torsion type bracing inside force it to stay flat? Just an idea.

- Rayne

I thought of doing that, but it appears to be an issue with one of the boards being warped. Took a try square to each board and sure enough, one was not true to its own sides—just enough so that when I got a “squared joint”, the whole thing flexed.

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FamilyMentors

8 posts in 348 days


#7 posted 09-17-2018 02:14 AM



What did the wood look like to start with? If it was flat and true I d unscrew the pocket screws, and measure your lengths again.

If it was your average found in the yard 2×4 s it s likely they were like a dogs hind leg, but they look pretty clean??

- therealSteveN

To be honest, it LOOKED true, but on reflection, sawing some of the boards was not smooth. Worse than Lowe’s—they were recovered from a neighbor’s yard barn he took down a few weeks back.

Looking at ripping some 3/4 plywood to build the frames. Might be lighter, and I know the plywood is straight.

Thanks to all for the suggestions!

View BattleRidge's profile

BattleRidge

105 posts in 603 days


#8 posted 09-17-2018 03:30 AM

If it is in the budget, you might consider starting from scratch. 1/4” plywood is pretty lightweight and will create a surface that is somewhat bouncy, and having a frame that isn’t straight and true could cause additional aggravation during play.

While a variety of material can be used, with varying results and cost, building it strong and right from the beginning could result in a more pleasant experience and a durable cornhole board that lasts well into the future.

The American Cornhole Organization specifications are listed below and can provide a good guideline to follow.

ACO Approved Boards:
1. Hardwood plywood playing surface measuring 47.5” to 48” x 23.5” to 24”.
2. The playing surface has a minimum thickness of 1/2” with cross-section backing, or 3/4” with or without cross-section backing.
3. Each Board in a set should weigh no less than 25 lbs.
4. Each hole is 6” diameter, centered 9” from the top of the board and centered from each side edge.
5. The front of the board is 3” to 4” from the ground to the top of the playing surface.
6. The back of the board is 12” from the ground to the top of the playing surface.
7. The playing surface should be finished – sanded to a very smooth texture. There should be little to no blemishes in the wood surface that may disrupt or distort play.
8. The playing surface can be painted with a high gloss latex paint or varnish. The surface should allow bags to slide when thrown, but not be so slippery that the bags slide back down the platform.

View proscaper's profile

proscaper

2 posts in 274 days


#9 posted 09-17-2018 04:20 AM

If it is caused by just one of the boards warping then you might be able to get away with just replacing it, otherwise it would be easier and better to start from scratch. I don’t think any amount of bracing or any thickness of ply covering it will be a good fix.

View FamilyMentors's profile

FamilyMentors

8 posts in 348 days


#10 posted 09-17-2018 01:49 PM



If it is in the budget, you might consider starting from scratch. 1/4” plywood is pretty lightweight and will create a surface that is somewhat bouncy, and having a frame that isn t straight and true could cause additional aggravation during play.

- BattleRidge

I like the idea of doing it regulation. Was trying to figure out a way to do it at a lower cost. I will start over, and I’m thinking going with 1/2” plywood with two braces. Would 1 X 4 pine work for the frame? I could go with plywood or even hardwood, but this IS a yard game after all :-)

View Snipes's profile

Snipes

405 posts in 2632 days


#11 posted 09-17-2018 02:25 PM

Battle got it covered. 1/4” plywood will not fix that twist.. Yes 1×4 pine is fine

-- if it is to be it is up to me

View bilyo's profile

bilyo

692 posts in 1489 days


#12 posted 09-17-2018 08:00 PM

If it is important that these frames be straight, it will take some extra time and effort to get them that way and keep they that way, using framing lumber. Even then, there are no guarantees. Since you are using free lumber, I’ll assume that you have some extra. Start by ripping the straightest boards into narrower strips; perhaps 1”. Be aware that as you rip them, they may take on a bow or twist due to internal stresses. When you have enough straight strips, glue them together to make your 2×3 frame members. Make sure the individual strips don’t go back into the same positions relative to one another. Clamp them or weight them to hold them straight until the glue dries. Make the laminations a little extra wide so, when dry if they are still not quite straight, you can do final straightening on the table saw or jointer. Now you can build your frame and it should be straight and stay that way.

You can probably take your existing frame apart by removing the screws and putting some stress on the joint. Since the joint is end grain to long grain, it will likely fail rather cleanly. If not, just run your saw through the joint. You will only shorten the members by the width of the saw blade. If your dimensions are not too critical, you will be able to re-use them.

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