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Beeswax mineral oil

by Canon
posted 09-07-2018 10:01 PM


40 replies so far

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lumbering_on

578 posts in 884 days


#1 posted 09-07-2018 10:17 PM

It depends on where and how you’re selling them. Selling them locally would normally require a local vendor’s permit, while selling them online you’d just need to make sure you are registered if they’re are sales taxes to be collected.

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Canon

70 posts in 1344 days


#2 posted 09-07-2018 10:31 PM

Thanks.. selling locally, how would obtain a permit from the local board of health? Are there certain wordings that you need to put on the container in terms of the ingredients?

Selling online, registered how and with what organization

Tks

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lumbering_on

578 posts in 884 days


#3 posted 09-07-2018 10:37 PM



Thanks.. selling locally, how would obtain a permit from the local board of health? Are there certain wordings that you need to put on the container in terms of the ingredients?

Selling online, registered how and with what organization

Tks

- Canon

You would just have to go online to find the forms for your local area. As for local health regulations, I’m not sure that would be necessary to get a health permit, but that would be specific to your local area, and regulations can vary quite a bit. However, if all the ingredients are part of the GRAS database, then there shouldn’t be any need.

View John Smith's profile

John Smith

1834 posts in 557 days


#4 posted 09-07-2018 11:09 PM

are you selling your boards now ??
for starters, I would include the 4oz bottle of oil with the board
and increase the price just a tad to cover everything and still make the profit.
when/if the time comes that people want to purchase the oil separately,
then you could explore that avenue when it presents itself.
in the meantime – conduct a search to see what similar items are on the market now.
best of luck in all your adventures !!

.

.

-- Failure is proof that you at least tried ~ now, go do it again, and again, until you get it right --

View CWWoodworking's profile

CWWoodworking

492 posts in 573 days


#5 posted 09-08-2018 01:29 AM

Personally I would not get in the finishing business. I have a poplar cutting board that is 15+ years old. and haven’t rubbed it with anything besides bacon fat and pork butt since I made it. Still works perfect.

How does the wax/mineral oil work? My understanding is the mineral oil doesnt “dry” while the wax does.

My board is more about function than looking pretty though.

View Richard's profile

Richard

11274 posts in 3427 days


#6 posted 09-08-2018 02:30 AM


Personally I would not get in the finishing business. I have a poplar cutting board that is 15+ years old. and haven t rubbed it with anything besides bacon fat and pork butt since I made it. Still works perfect.

How does the wax/mineral oil work? My understanding is the mineral oil doesnt “dry” while the wax does.

My board is more about function than looking pretty though.

- CWWoodworking

I agree with CW. I have 2 Functional Solid Wood Cutting Boards that are about 8 years old. They Have never seen any kind of a Finish except the ones mentioned by CW. They are always well cleaned after every use.

I only use Mineral Oil for what it was initially intended. DEF: A distillate of petroleum (especially one used medicinally as a laxative or stool softener)

Mineral Oil IS Safe to use as a Wood Finish. Just be sure it’s FDA approved for Human Consumption.

Oil on Wood? I use PURE Tung Oil or Danish Oil as shown below from Lee Valley.

Rick S.

-- Richard (Ontario, CANADA)

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Rich

4493 posts in 984 days


#7 posted 09-08-2018 05:23 AM


Personally I would not get in the finishing business. I have a poplar cutting board that is 15+ years old. and haven t rubbed it with anything besides bacon fat and pork butt since I made it. Still works perfect.

- CWWoodworking

Ever heard of oxidation? Fifteen years of animal fat will turn rancid. It won’t kill you, but it’s disgusting to think anyone was fed food prepared on that board.

Besides, any finish is food safe once it’s cured. Assuming you keep the board clean that is, and animal fat does not cure, it goes rancid.

Here’s what Bob Flexner has to say about food safe finishes:

———————————————————————————————————————-

In fact, all finishes are safe to eat off of or be chewed on once the finish has fully cured. The rule of thumb for curing is 30 days, but warm conditions make curing happen faster. With all solvent-based finishes, you can determine that a finish has cured sufficiently by pressing your nose against the dry finish and sniffing. If there is any odor, the finish isn’t yet cured. Only if you can’t smell anything is the object safe for food or mouth contact.

Flexner, Bob. Understanding Wood Finishing: How to Select and Apply the Right Finish (American Woodworker) (p. 76). Fox Chapel Publishing. Kindle Edition.

■ No Material Safety Data Sheet (MSDS), required by the government to list all hazardous or toxic effects of a product, warns against contact with food or children’s mouths for any oil or varnish finish, or for any other finish.

■ The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) lists all common driers as safe for food contact as long as the finish is made properly— that is, as long as the finish cures. (The FDA doesn’t “approve” of finishes as some manufacturers claim. The FDA approves of ingredients and sets rules for testing that a finish cures properly.)

■ You have never heard of anyone (adult or child) being poisoned by contact with a cured clear finish. If someone had been poisoned, you can bet it would have made the news!

Let’s finally put this myth to bed and use other, more legitimate, criteria for choosing a finish.

Flexner, Bob. Understanding Wood Finishing: How to Select and Apply the Right Finish (American Woodworker) (p. 76). Fox Chapel Publishing. Kindle Edition.

-- Knowledge is not skill. Knowledge plus ten thousand times is skill. -- Shinichi Suzuki

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CWWoodworking

492 posts in 573 days


#8 posted 09-08-2018 08:43 PM

Rich, I clean it very well and dont use the animal fat as a “finish”. But you know there is fat that soaked into the wood. No matter how much you clean a wood cutting board, there will always be something left. The wax and mineral oil isnt stopping it either. So what is the difference?

My point was you dont really need to finish a cutting board. I think it looks kinda weird when you have wax or oil over a heavily used board. Like your trying to make it look perdy except its got cuts all over it.

To each their own though.

View AlaskaGuy's profile

AlaskaGuy

5283 posts in 2703 days


#9 posted 09-08-2018 09:15 PM

Please just listen to the first 20 seconds of this video by Charles Neil.

https://youtu.be/g2rTy3W-QEY

-- Alaskan's for Global warming!

View therealSteveN's profile

therealSteveN

2874 posts in 968 days


#10 posted 09-08-2018 09:34 PM

Truer words never spoken. I had always been a proponent of regular application of MO, sometimes with wax, but after seeing that video a while back I stopped making cutting boards for a while, and did some testing of my own. My next cutting boards will have Arm r Seal on them.

-- Think safe, be safe

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Peteybadboy

739 posts in 2344 days


#11 posted 09-08-2018 09:39 PM

I think John Smith gave you good marketing advice. Make it a very small bottle.

-- Petey

View Woodknack's profile

Woodknack

12814 posts in 2774 days


#12 posted 09-08-2018 11:30 PM

Mineral oil is just for looks. If I sold cutting boards, I would definitely smear on some Howard’s to make them pretty but it isn’t necessary.

-- Rick M, http://thewoodknack.blogspot.com/

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Richard

11274 posts in 3427 days


#13 posted 09-09-2018 12:38 AM



Please just listen to the first 20 seconds of this video by Charles Neil.

https://youtu.be/g2rTy3W-QEY

- AlaskaGuy

AG: Very Interesting!

Rick S.

-- Richard (Ontario, CANADA)

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AlaskaGuy

5283 posts in 2703 days


#14 posted 09-09-2018 01:07 AM



Mineral oil is just for looks. If I sold cutting boards, I would definitely smear on some Howard s to make them pretty but it isn t necessary.

- Woodknack

Don’t know if this is true but it always seem to make sense to me. When an end grain cutting board is new it’s quite porous. Applying mineral until the board is saturated with oil and reapplying periodically would fill the pours with oil and keep meat juices , water etc from soaking into the board.

Skip to the 9:30 mark and this guy soaks his boards in mineral oil.

https://youtu.be/TmnBh6WwYT4

-- Alaskan's for Global warming!

View AlaskaGuy's profile

AlaskaGuy

5283 posts in 2703 days


#15 posted 09-09-2018 01:17 AM


Please just listen to the first 20 seconds of this video by Charles Neil.

https://youtu.be/g2rTy3W-QEY

- AlaskaGuy

AG: Very Interesting!

Rick S.

- Rick S.


I did too.

-- Alaskan's for Global warming!

View Rich's profile

Rich

4493 posts in 984 days


#16 posted 09-09-2018 01:19 AM

I don’t make cutting boards, but a method I’ve heard of is to melt paraffin and flood the surface, let it harden and scrape off the excess. Supposedly that seals it off pretty good. It’d be inexpensive too since paraffin is cheap and most of it would be reclaimed to melt for the next board.

-- Knowledge is not skill. Knowledge plus ten thousand times is skill. -- Shinichi Suzuki

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000

2859 posts in 1293 days


#17 posted 09-09-2018 01:26 AM

I dip them in motor oil, gives them a nice amber color.

View AlaskaGuy's profile

AlaskaGuy

5283 posts in 2703 days


#18 posted 09-09-2018 01:30 AM


I dip them in motor oil, gives them a nice amber color.

- jbay


After dipping in motor oil cover them in Alder sawdust for a few minutes and then dust off. The Alder dust quickly absorbs the excess motor oil and leaves a nice surface. Trust me on this.

-- Alaskan's for Global warming!

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Richard

11274 posts in 3427 days


#19 posted 09-09-2018 03:10 AM


Please just listen to the first 20 seconds of this video by Charles Neil.

https://youtu.be/g2rTy3W-QEY

- AlaskaGuy

AG: Very Interesting!

Rick S.

- Rick S.

I did too.

- AlaskaGuy

That’s Nice! ;-}

-- Richard (Ontario, CANADA)

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Richard

11274 posts in 3427 days


#20 posted 09-09-2018 03:12 AM


I dip them in motor oil, gives them a nice amber color.

- jbay

After dipping in motor oil cover them in Alder sawdust for a few minutes and then dust off. The Alder dust quickly absorbs the excess motor oil and leaves a nice surface. Trust me on this.

- AlaskaGuy

AG:

Okay I’ll Trust You ….... on this …lol…

-- Richard (Ontario, CANADA)

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Woodknack

12814 posts in 2774 days


#21 posted 09-09-2018 03:13 AM


Mineral oil is just for looks. If I sold cutting boards, I would definitely smear on some Howard s to make them pretty but it isn t necessary.

- Woodknack
Don t know if this is true but it always seem to make sense to me. When an end grain cutting board is new it s quite porous. Applying mineral until the board is saturated with oil and reapplying periodically would fill the pours with oil and keep meat juices , water etc from soaking into the board.

Skip to the 9:30 mark and this guy soaks his boards in mineral oil.

https://youtu.be/TmnBh6WwYT4

- AlaskaGuy

Years back someone (can’t remember who) did an experiment where they soaked pieces of wood in oil overnight, weighed them, then in water, and weighed them again and the wood still absorbed a lot of water. So I always felt like you could never saturate a piece of wood with oil, unless maybe you used a vacuum chamber. Even then I wonder if it would be “waterproof?”

I have a cutting board that is 18-20 years old, no finish, has been oiled once, run through the dishwasher ?? 50, 100 times? No idea. Still flat. Doesn’t smell. Twice I’ve sanded it with 120 because it was starting to look stained and the stains were only on the surface, a minute of sanding and it looks new. I don’t even recognize the wood species, something moderately hard and blonde, but more open grained that hard maple.

But I’ve been to hunting and fishing camps where people cleaned their catch or kill on wood benches built for the purpose that were occasionally rinsed with sea or river water and nothing else. One guy after another, blood and guts everywhere, to my knowledge there was never any contamination.

-- Rick M, http://thewoodknack.blogspot.com/

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Kazooman

1318 posts in 2347 days


#22 posted 09-09-2018 02:19 PM


But I ve been to hunting and fishing camps where people cleaned their catch or kill on wood benches built for the purpose that were occasionally rinsed with sea or river water and nothing else. One guy after another, blood and guts everywhere, to my knowledge there was never any contamination.
- Woodknack

“Everyone went home with a bad case of the trots, but we blamed that on all the beer!” (Sorry, I couldn’t resist).

I do think that the mineral oil / beeswax does help keep out water to a degree. Not from soaking the board in a tub all night, but from food juices and a quick water clean up. I give away all the boards I make and always include a bottle of Howard Butcher Block Conditioner and a printed set of care instructions.

Mainly, I really like the look the beeswax gives to the boards. Here is the latest, based on the Woodwhisper’s design. Maple and Purpleheart. I like to add finger grips, feet, and lately I have gone to putting a gently contour on the ends and sides and a bullnose profile. This one will actually go to its new home later today.

View AlaskaGuy's profile

AlaskaGuy

5283 posts in 2703 days


#23 posted 09-09-2018 03:52 PM


But I ve been to hunting and fishing camps where people cleaned their catch or kill on wood benches built for the purpose that were occasionally rinsed with sea or river water and nothing else. One guy after another, blood and guts everywhere, to my knowledge there was never any contamination.
- Woodknack

“Everyone went home with a bad case of the trots, but we blamed that on all the beer!” (Sorry, I couldn t resist).

I do think that the mineral oil / beeswax does help keep out water to a degree. Not from soaking the board in a tub all night, but from food juices and a quick water clean up. I give away all the boards I make and always include a bottle of Howard Butcher Block Conditioner and a printed set of care instructions.

Mainly, I really like the look the beeswax gives to the boards. Here is the latest, based on the Woodwhisper s design. Maple and Purpleheart. I like to add finger grips, feet, and lately I have gone to putting a gently contour on the ends and sides and a bullnose profile. This one will actually go to its new home later today.

- Kazooman


I do know my cutting board with mineral oil on it (my board is 10 years old) will bead water. I don’t know how long it will bead water before is soaks in (if it does) but I’ll be testing that. My experience would indicate the liquids and time spans of “normal use” situations the mineral oil does protect the liquids form penetrating the board to a degree it is not washed off during clean. I will report my findings.

-- Alaskan's for Global warming!

View DrDirt's profile

DrDirt

4558 posts in 4136 days


#24 posted 09-11-2018 03:19 PM

Don t know if this is true but it always seem to make sense to me. When an end grain cutting board is new it s quite porous. Applying mineral until the board is saturated with oil and reapplying periodically would fill the pours with oil and keep meat juices , water etc from soaking into the board.

Skip to the 9:30 mark and this guy soaks his boards in mineral oil.

https://youtu.be/TmnBh6WwYT4

- AlaskaGuy


I just finished making his 3-D board
He finishes all the boards the same. Soaks them in mineral oil. Then a hot coating of 4:1 mineral oil with beeswax

I did the same but flooding rather than soaking in pure mo

The MO/wax sets up about like cross between parrafin and vaseline
I coated then scraped off the excess with a credit card and then Wiped down with a paper towel just this morning before work. k

-- “The two most important days in your life are the day you are born and the day you find out why.” Mark Twain

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LesB

2095 posts in 3837 days


#25 posted 09-11-2018 04:08 PM

Back to the original question.

First there are dozens of “home made” concoctions of salad board finishes containing a variety of ingredients from mineral oil, wax, tung oil, linseed oil, shellac, various lacquers and so on. But you may still be able to sell yours because there are always gullible people out there who will think your’s is a “little” bit better. However I notice you live in Mass. which undoubtedly has numerous rules, laws, and regulations enhanced by umpteen different agencies and bureaucrats that will give you nightmares trying to “legally” sell your product. Not to mention what happens if you should go interstate; as mentioned taxes for one. Buy lottery tickets, you have a better chance of making money without trying to re-invent the wheel.

My only problem with mineral oil and wax is it never drys and can transfer to any surface it is set on….like a nice table cloth; and don’t ever try to renew the surface by sanding unless you have a surplus of sand paper to get to waste, although you can use a cabinet scraper. My preference for cutting or “cheese and cracker” boards is one of the oils that “cure” like tung oil, linseed oil or my most used preference, processed Walnut oil. I accented the word “cure” because these oils do not dry they go through a chemical process that cures them into the wood….and it actually helps strengthen the wood. Like mineral oil they enhance the wood color and grain patterns and can be re-applied as needed. With multiple coats you can actually build a surface or top coat that has a shine to it. Also you can apply a top coat of wax to polish it if you desire.

The Charles Neil video (from Alaska Guy) was good and I do use the Salad Bowl finished mentioned on my salad bowls and similar items and it lasts for many years. However it is a hard finish and on a cutting board it will eventually show knife cut marks (which can be sanded out and refinished if desired). I recently resurfaced a 15 year old salad bowl originally finished with Behlen’s salad bowl finish which had such heavy use the finish was wearing through. It came out looking like new.

Good luck with your venture if you decide to proceed.

-- Les B, Oregon

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AlaskaGuy

5283 posts in 2703 days


#26 posted 09-11-2018 05:32 PM

FOR WHAT ITS WORTH….....PROBABLY NOT MUCH

I did a little test which is more of actual use and meaningful test (to me) than submerging the board overnight in water.
First I weight my board 2620 grams

Poured water on it and weigh it 2674 garms

Let it set of 2 hours, wiped the water off and weighed it again. It gained 6 grams, not much. I expected to see some dark spots where the water was beading up on the board but they never appeared.

My conclusion of my funky test….......mineral oil fills the end grain pores of of the wood to keep meat juices soaking into the board in any appreciable amount. Good enough for who it for anyway. I see no reason to change.

My board has been in use for 10 years and has been run though a wide belt sander about a year ago to refinish. It gummed up the sandpaper so of figure the oil mineral oil must soak in to the pours and stay there.

I do reapply mineral oil every 3-4 months when I think of it.

-- Alaskan's for Global warming!

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Woodknack

12814 posts in 2774 days


#27 posted 09-11-2018 06:23 PM

Can’t argue with those results AlaskaGuy. That doesn’t convince me mineral oil is necessary but it does change my opinion that it doesn’t repel water.

-- Rick M, http://thewoodknack.blogspot.com/

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DrDirt

4558 posts in 4136 days


#28 posted 09-11-2018 07:54 PM

While not finishing.
I suspect that you would in selling this face a similar burden to those selling soaps and essential oils at art and craft fairs

Good read
https://www.soapqueen.com/business/a-surprise-visit-from-the-fda/

-- “The two most important days in your life are the day you are born and the day you find out why.” Mark Twain

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Rich

4493 posts in 984 days


#29 posted 09-11-2018 08:14 PM


While not finishing.
I suspect that you would in selling this face a similar burden to those selling soaps and essential oils at art and craft fairs

Good read
https://www.soapqueen.com/business/a-surprise-visit-from-the-fda/

- DrDirt

Making health claims will get you every time. Just look at Gwyneth Paltrow’s fine for the claims that her company’s vaginal eggs boost hormones and help with bladder control. If she’d simply sold little egg shaped objects with a tube of lubricant, there’d be no problem.

I don’t think the OP’s idea of selling his finish blend will get the FDA interested in him unless he makes false or unsubstantiated claims about it.

-- Knowledge is not skill. Knowledge plus ten thousand times is skill. -- Shinichi Suzuki

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DrDirt

4558 posts in 4136 days


#30 posted 09-13-2018 03:37 AM


While not finishing.
I suspect that you would in selling this face a similar burden to those selling soaps and essential oils at art and craft fairs

Good read
https://www.soapqueen.com/business/a-surprise-visit-from-the-fda/

- DrDirt

Making health claims will get you every time. Just look at Gwyneth Paltrow s fine for the claims that her company s vaginal eggs boost hormones and help with bladder control. If she d simply sold little egg shaped objects with a tube of lubricant, there d be no problem.

I don t think the OP s idea of selling his finish blend will get the FDA interested in him unless he makes false or unsubstantiated claims about it.

- Rich


Agree mostly – question becomes one of the finish being “Food Safe”....so not a Drug claim, but does fall under the “Food” part of FDA
It would make sense that since mineral oil and beeswax are known to be safe, that he shouldn’t have an issue, until there are “proprietary ingredients”... then they can ask for your test data, and show that it is prepared in sanitary conditions.

-- “The two most important days in your life are the day you are born and the day you find out why.” Mark Twain

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CWWoodworking

492 posts in 573 days


#31 posted 09-13-2018 05:03 AM

When I first made my cutting board 15ish years ago, I did the paraffin wax/card scrap thing. Looked great. It lasted less than one cooked pork butt worked up on it. After I cleaned it, you could tell it was compromised.

As for as finishes being GRAS, there is a flavor enhancer that is used in the food industry that comes from a gland in a beavers’s anus. It is also GRAS.

Me, I just like the natural, used wood look. YMMV.

View AlaskaGuy's profile

AlaskaGuy

5283 posts in 2703 days


#32 posted 09-13-2018 05:22 AM



When I first made my cutting board 15ish years ago, I did the paraffin wax/card scrap thing. Looked great. It lasted less than one cooked pork butt worked up on it. After I cleaned it, you could tell it was compromised.

As for as finishes being GRAS, there is a flavor enhancer that is used in the food industry that comes from a gland in a beavers s anus. It is also GRAS.

Me, I just like the natural, used wood look. YMMV.

- CWWoodworking


My board with mineral oil has never let me down. I use it for everything (They tell you not) almost daily and never had a problem.

I guess everyones mileage differs. Maybe something to do with application meteoroids, I don’ know. It work for me.

-- Alaskan's for Global warming!

View Richard's profile

Richard

11274 posts in 3427 days


#33 posted 09-13-2018 05:47 AM

A.G. Hell of an impressive test that you did! & Conclusion! Good Work!

OW! C.W. I just noticed this little Diddy “As for as finishes being GRAS, there is a flavor enhancer that is used in the food industry that comes from a gland in a beavers s anus. It is also GRAS. Now I’m gonna have to stop using the TERM “Bangin’ Beaver” (UH OH!) ...LOL…

Regards Guys: Rick S.

-- Richard (Ontario, CANADA)

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AZWoody

1449 posts in 1618 days


#34 posted 09-13-2018 04:11 PM

Food safety aside, remember there are people who are allergic to beeswax. Probably more than who might have an allergic reaction to whatever wood you use.

I had thought about doing the exact same thing as you but there are so many products already that are on amazon, ebay and etsy that are so cheap, being competitive is going to be hard unless you just want to make it a convenience and not worried about a profit.

I decided to just use mineral wax to give the product a nice appearance when they see it for the first time and then they can choose for themselves how best they want to finish it.

View AlaskaGuy's profile

AlaskaGuy

5283 posts in 2703 days


#35 posted 09-13-2018 05:20 PM

Pure beeswax has not generally been shown to cause allergic reactions in people. But sometimes propolis remains mixed with the beeswax when it is harvested. It is the propolis (or rather, certain constituents in the propolis) that can cause contact dermatitis in people who become sensitized to it.

I believe the traditional wax to mix with mineral oil for cutting board is paraffin wax, not bees wax. Paraffin wax is use a lot for canning. EDIT a quick search show bees wax it often use for cutting boards. I’ve always use paraffin wax when I have used a wax. Usually I just use mineral oil.

Eating a lot of paraffin can lead to intestinal obstruction, which can cause abdominal pain, nausea, vomiting, and possible constipation. If the paraffin contains a dye, a person who has an allergy to that dye may develop tongue and throat swelling, wheezing, and trouble breathing.

A lot of people are allergic to peanuts. The still sell them.

-- Alaskan's for Global warming!

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AZWoody

1449 posts in 1618 days


#36 posted 09-13-2018 05:38 PM



Pure beeswax has not generally been shown to cause allergic reactions in people. But sometimes propolis remains mixed with the beeswax when it is harvested. It is the propolis (or rather, certain constituents in the propolis) that can cause contact dermatitis in people who become sensitized to it.

I believe the traditional wax to mix with mineral oil for cutting board is paraffin wax, not bees wax. Paraffin wax is use a lot for canning. EDIT a quick search show bees wax it often use for cutting boards. I ve always use paraffin wax when I have used a wax. Usually I just use mineral oil.

Eating a lot of paraffin can lead to intestinal obstruction, which can cause abdominal pain, nausea, vomiting, and possible constipation. If the paraffin contains a dye, a person who has an allergy to that dye may develop tongue and throat swelling, wheezing, and trouble breathing.

A lot of people are allergic to peanuts. The still sell them.

- AlaskaGuy

Not arguing any of that. I know the beeswax I have is blocks straight from the hive so unfiltered. Beeswax is also great for filling any small areas where there might have been a slight opening from snipe from the planer, etc.

The only reason I brought it up was that after talking to people who have made a lot of cutting boards for sale they shy away from beeswax as there are people who will avoid anything with beeswax because of allergies and there is no way to be sure if it has the allergen component or not.

I’ve also seen carnauba wax used also. There are so many different oils used now it’s almost impossible to keep up. I’ve even seen hemp oil being used now as well. Walnut oil is also used and there are people allergic to walnuts but in the end, you can’t satisfy everyone but my point is leaving as much to the consumer as possible.

I just let them choose how they want to seal it after my initial mineral oil application.

I have considered hemp oil, not for any reason that it’s better or worse but it’s kind of the trendy thing now and I’ll ride the wave if it makes me money :)

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DrDirt

4558 posts in 4136 days


#37 posted 09-13-2018 07:09 PM

Eating a lot of paraffin can lead to intestinal obstruction, which can cause abdominal pain, nausea, vomiting, and possible constipation. If the paraffin contains a dye, a person who has an allergy to that dye may develop tongue and throat swelling, wheezing, and trouble breathing.

A lot of people are allergic to peanuts. The still sell them.

- AlaskaGuy

I do not think that you can actually ‘Physucally” transfer enough wax out of the pores of a cutting board, to your food for this to be an issue.
Usually these kinds of things are from children eating crayons, and birthday candles and such.

Issue for the OP will be, have a documented process for making and bottling this stuff.
Be careful about any “Claims” that are made about the product on the labels and such.

Be ready to talk with the government…. given they like to shut down lemonade stands for proper permits….
If you are using your garage ‘commercially’... if you set something on fire, you will have Homeowners insurance issues.

-- “The two most important days in your life are the day you are born and the day you find out why.” Mark Twain

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AlaskaGuy

5283 posts in 2703 days


#38 posted 09-13-2018 07:23 PM


Eating a lot of paraffin can lead to intestinal obstruction, which can cause abdominal pain, nausea, vomiting, and possible constipation. If the paraffin contains a dye, a person who has an allergy to that dye may develop tongue and throat swelling, wheezing, and trouble breathing.

A lot of people are allergic to peanuts. The still sell them.

- AlaskaGuy

I do not think that you can actually Physucally” transfer enough wax out of the pores of a cutting board, to your food for this to be an issue.
Usually these kinds of things are from children eating crayons, and birthday candles and such.

- DrDirt


I agree with you and I never said you could get a lot of wax off a cutting board. I was quoting something I found online. I should have put that in quotation makes. They were talking in general, nothing to to with cutting boards. I induced that in my post as general information on paraffin wax.

-- Alaskan's for Global warming!

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Dakkar

354 posts in 2322 days


#39 posted 09-14-2018 01:55 AM

Personally, I only use beeswax, which I buy in little flakes that are easily melted. I don’t know if anyone’s mentioned this, but the mineral oil to use is the kind sold in pharmacies for internal use, not the baby oil kind. Also, for cutting boards it’s good to do a refresher coat once a month or so, though in a pinch you can give it quick rub with warm wax paper.

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Richard

11274 posts in 3427 days


#40 posted 09-15-2018 11:33 PM

Testing For My PULSE. Which is still not working. Probably My Computer & nothing to do with the Site.

Sorry to intrude. Carry On!

Rick S.

-- Richard (Ontario, CANADA)

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