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View jaysone's profile

Interesting find: Delta 36-5100

by jaysone
posted 09-03-2018 04:37 AM


23 replies so far

View MrUnix's profile (online now)

MrUnix

7468 posts in 2680 days


#1 posted 09-03-2018 05:09 AM

Figure on another ~$200 or so for a new fence. As for the starting problem.. It could be as simple as a loose wire, or more likely, a blown start capacitor – cost to fix anywhere from free to maybe $15

Cheers,
Brad

-- Brad in FL - In Dog I trust... everything else is questionable

View Woodknack's profile

Woodknack

12891 posts in 2861 days


#2 posted 09-03-2018 06:10 AM

Hmm, don’t those have a proprietary motor? I would probably pass at that price. What makes this one so much more expensive than the $600 Lowes version?

-- Rick M, http://thewoodknack.blogspot.com/

View jaysone's profile

jaysone

11 posts in 385 days


#3 posted 09-03-2018 11:47 AM



Figure on another ~$200 or so for a new fence. As for the starting problem.. It could be as simple as a loose wire, or more likely, a blown start capacitor – cost to fix anywhere from free to maybe $15

Cheers,
Brad

- MrUnix

I accept that a nice chunk of change will be needed for a new fence. I would hope you’re right about the starting issue. This is basically a new saw so maybe I can contact Delta about any issues?

View knotscott's profile (online now)

knotscott

8325 posts in 3857 days


#4 posted 09-03-2018 12:04 PM



Hmm, don t those have a proprietary motor? I would probably pass at that price. What makes this one so much more expensive than the $600 Lowes version?

- Woodknack

Solid cast iron wings and a bigger motor. The fence rail may also have been one piece vs two piece.

-- Happiness is like wetting your pants...everyone can see it, but only you can feel the warmth....

View WhyMe's profile

WhyMe

1175 posts in 2042 days


#5 posted 09-03-2018 02:14 PM

You can get the Delta T3 rail and fence for $219 from Home Depot. Motor capacitor, if that’s the problem about $10. So the motor is the crap shoot. Might be worth the risk if you can get it for $200. The wings are also held up by the rails.

View bilyo's profile

bilyo

821 posts in 1584 days


#6 posted 09-03-2018 02:16 PM

I’m not up on values. So, I can’t tell you if it is a good buy. But Amazon and Home Depot both list that model at over $1,000 with a fence. I have a similar older version of that saw in that it has the solid CI wings and I love it. The wings can likely be adjusted into alignment and once you put a fence on it , the rails will help hold them. I would find the saw very tempting. As MrUnix said, the motor is probably an easy fix. Too bad it doesn’t include a fence and a good one will be a bit pricey. Maybe you can negotiate the price down. Unless it has some shortcomings that I’m not aware of, and based on experience with my similar Delta, I think it would be a good saw that would provide good service for years to come.

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jaysone

11 posts in 385 days


#7 posted 09-05-2018 05:58 PM

Well we settled on $220 so I grabbed the saw this morning. Super pumped about it! The picture used in the posting was obviously a bit old cause there’s a little more rust. So.. first things first, how do I go about cleaning this bad boy up?? Maybe even steps beyond the rust. Do I need to do any lubricating?

Secondly, and most importantly, the starting issue. I plugged it in (wired for 120) and turned it on. It just makes a hum noise but the blade barely rotates. I can give the blade a push with a scrap piece of wood and then the motor is able to get up to full speed. Boy is it smooth! Head and shoulders above my no-name portable ts. Where do I start with diagnostics on the starting? I’m fairly handy, but my experience is mainly with small engines such as lawn mowers, tillers, etc.

View TheFridge's profile

TheFridge

10859 posts in 1967 days


#8 posted 09-05-2018 07:10 PM

id change the capacitors for the motor issue. If still unresolved you’ll have to crack the motor and check the centrifugal switch.

Put a wire wheel in a drill. Clean in with MS or a solvent. Wax of spray whatever you want after that.

I wouldn’t worry too much about lubricants. I use wax nowadays on everything but that’s me. Dry lube sometimes.

-- Shooting down the walls of heartache. Bang bang. I am. The warrior.

View WhyMe's profile

WhyMe

1175 posts in 2042 days


#9 posted 09-05-2018 07:14 PM

Open up the plastic motor housing and remove the capacitor and test it. There are plenty of YouTube videos showing how to test. If bad get a replacement that is the same voltage and Uf. Make sure to take a good picture so you know how to hook the cap back up. There was one person that posted a starting problem with the 36-725 and when he opened up the motor housing a wire had come loose from the cap and was hanging. He figured out where it plugged too and the motor was up and running. You might get lucky.

View TheFridge's profile

TheFridge

10859 posts in 1967 days


#10 posted 09-05-2018 07:20 PM

Ditto. Now that he brings that up it’s happened to me before as well. Good starting point.

-- Shooting down the walls of heartache. Bang bang. I am. The warrior.

View jaysone's profile

jaysone

11 posts in 385 days


#11 posted 09-05-2018 08:10 PM

@TheFridge and @WhyMe Thank you for the replies. I did a little searching on YouTube as you suggested and found a nicely detailed video here:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=M-j6PhthXJY

I just wanted to post it in case it can help anyone in the future.

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jaysone

11 posts in 385 days


#12 posted 09-06-2018 01:06 AM

Well I may not have the easy out on this one. The capacitor looks brand new.

I’ll have to put a meter on it to be sure. Also, the gray cabinet has all four sides welded to the corner tubes. Thanks for the solid construction Delta, but this is going to be a pain in the @$$ to do any work on the motor.

View MrUnix's profile (online now)

MrUnix

7468 posts in 2680 days


#13 posted 09-06-2018 01:14 AM

Capacitors can and frequently do fail without any outward indication – just because it ‘looks’ fine, doesn’t mean it is. Fortunately, you can easily test them with a cheap meter set in resistance mode – even one of those free HF meters you can get with a coupon every other month.

Cheers,
Brad

-- Brad in FL - In Dog I trust... everything else is questionable

View jaysone's profile

jaysone

11 posts in 385 days


#14 posted 09-06-2018 02:05 AM



Capacitors can and frequently do fail without any outward indication – just because it looks fine, doesn t mean it is. Fortunately, you can easily test them with a cheap meter set in resistance mode – even one of those free HF meters you can get with a coupon every other month.

Cheers,
Brad

- MrUnix

I tested it while disconnected from the motor wires. Reading was .784 and very gradually counted up .001 at a time. Not really sure if that’s good or bad.

View lumbering_on's profile

lumbering_on

578 posts in 971 days


#15 posted 09-06-2018 03:32 AM

I have the 36-725, and it’s a solid unit. The only issue I have with it is that it’s a pain to make a zero clearance insert for it.

Sorry that I can’t help with the motor, as mine has never been an issue. However, you would need the specs on the capacitor to determine what’s going on with it. A capacitor will charge very quickly to 63.2%,. but then slows very quickly, and in theory, it never reaches 100%.

View jaysone's profile

jaysone

11 posts in 385 days


#16 posted 09-06-2018 03:46 AM



I tested it while disconnected from the motor wires. Reading was .784 and very gradually counted up .001 at a time. Not really sure if that’s good or bad.

- jaysone

Put the meter into uf. The capacitor label states 324uf. The meter reads 386uf. Unless my math is wrong, that would be a 19% tolerance which can’t be acceptable. I’m going to replace the capacitor.

View lumbering_on's profile

lumbering_on

578 posts in 971 days


#17 posted 09-06-2018 03:58 AM

I tested it while disconnected from the motor wires. Reading was .784 and very gradually counted up .001 at a time. Not really sure if that’s good or bad.

- jaysone

Put the meter into uf. The capacitor label states 324uf. The meter reads 386uf. Unless my math is wrong, that would be a 19% tolerance which can’t be acceptable. I’m going to replace the capacitor.

- jaysone

It’s possible that it is correct. Can you see the code? I can only see the 65C, so that would be ^4^, the first ^ should be a Z,Y,X and then the last one should tell you the tolerance. Anything between A-R would mean it’s out of tolerance.

View jaysone's profile

jaysone

11 posts in 385 days


#18 posted 09-06-2018 04:04 AM



It s possible that it is correct. Can you see the code? I can only see the 65C, so that would be ^4^, the first ^ should be a Z,Y,X and then the last one should tell you the tolerance. Anything between A-R would mean it s out of tolerance.

- lumbering_on

Here’s a better pic..

View lumbering_on's profile

lumbering_on

578 posts in 971 days


#19 posted 09-06-2018 04:26 AM

It’s some Chinese no-name capacitor that doesn’t have a tolerance on it – not exactly surprising as the Delta brand is made there now.

I’d definitely replace it, as this is likely the issue.

View MrUnix's profile (online now)

MrUnix

7468 posts in 2680 days


#20 posted 09-06-2018 04:27 AM

Also, don’t forget to test the run capacitor, as they are both connected together in parallel at startup – until the centrifugal switch disconnects and pulls the start capacitor out of circuit.

Cheers,
Brad

-- Brad in FL - In Dog I trust... everything else is questionable

View knotscott's profile (online now)

knotscott

8325 posts in 3857 days


#21 posted 09-06-2018 10:09 AM


I tested it while disconnected from the motor wires. Reading was .784 and very gradually counted up .001 at a time. Not really sure if that’s good or bad.

- jaysone

Put the meter into uf. The capacitor label states 324uf. The meter reads 386uf. Unless my math is wrong, that would be a 19% tolerance which can’t be acceptable. I’m going to replace the capacitor.

- jaysone

Capacitor tolerance of +/- 20% isn’t uncommon in cheap caps, and should still be fine. If the caps test good, or a replacement cap doesn’t fix it, take a look at the centrifugal switch.

-- Happiness is like wetting your pants...everyone can see it, but only you can feel the warmth....

View jaysone's profile

jaysone

11 posts in 385 days


#22 posted 10-22-2018 03:38 PM

Well I’ve replaced both the start and running capacitor. The saw still does not run. I’m wondering about my new start capacitor. The original is a 324 mfd and this new one is 270-324 mfd. When I put a meter on it I consistently get a 269 reading. Could this low value cause a start issue?

Also, I can’t get the saw to full speed by push starting the blade anymore ( I was actually only able to do this once, the very first time). I’ve never left the power on for more than a few seconds, but I’ve tried to run the saw 5 – 10 different times. Am I causing damage by turning on the saw without it successfully turning the blade?

View EdDantes's profile

EdDantes

74 posts in 392 days


#23 posted 10-22-2018 03:59 PM

At this point it seems like it may be worth it to take out the motor and bring it to a repair shop.

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