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New to the Group

by  Newbie
posted 08-09-2018 01:55 AM


29 replies so far

View clin's profile

clin

1056 posts in 1472 days


#1 posted 08-09-2018 03:39 AM

Welcome to LJ’s.

I am not a hand tool expert by any measure, but I watch one on YouTube by the name of Paul Sellers.

https://www.youtube.com/user/PaulSellersWoodwork

He seems to really know his stuff. While he probably owns every hand tool known to man, he has projects using little more than a single handsaw, plane, chisel and mallet. His videos and explanations are very clear. Just plain good stuff.

P.S. While Paul Sellers is a hand tool guy, he uses relatively modern hand tools (< 100 years old in most cases). So, perhaps isn’t the guy to learn Colonial Williamsburg woodworking from.

I have seen PBS videos for a show I think it was called the “Woodright Shop”. He’s stuff may not go quite that far back either, but it’s pretty old technology he uses. Not sure if there are YouTube videos of that show.

-- Clin

View Desert_Woodworker's profile

Desert_Woodworker

1866 posts in 1691 days


#2 posted 08-09-2018 05:34 AM

”Please don’t follow me … I don’t know where I’m going.” ... as your closing intro.
Great NEWS for you! We are here to help.
Just remember ALDER
Welcome

-- Desert_Woodworker

View  Newbie's profile

 Newbie

24 posts in 403 days


#3 posted 08-09-2018 11:32 AM

I asked same question on workshop page. GR8HUNTER gave me this link: http://lumberjocks.com/RonAylor1760/workshop

Want to send message but have to make 5 posts. Do I just ask this question again?

View Bill White's profile

Bill White

5224 posts in 4437 days


#4 posted 08-09-2018 12:28 PM

Welcome Unplugged. Remember this…………..everyone of us started with “I want to do that” in his/her mind, and none of us have quit learning.

-- [email protected]

View mahdee's profile

mahdee

4291 posts in 2244 days


#5 posted 08-09-2018 01:00 PM

I guess the first question is, do you have a workshop? If not, building one could really help you learn a few things about woodworking. Then think about the essentials; workbench, vise, storage, etc. Your bench needs to be pretty heavy duty since you will be doing a lot of pulling and pushing on it. Then comes the tools which you probably need to accumulate over time. When it comes to using only hand tools, consider purchasing the best tools (not the most expensive) by looking at the specs and reviews by pro who were not compensated by the company. Or ask others in the trade. Japan tools make some amazing hand tools but you probably want to use american made tools which can be a challenge. There are several individuals who make various traditional steel tools but I can’t think of any right now(youtube it).
Welcome to LJ

-- earthartandfoods.com

View JCamp's profile

JCamp

997 posts in 1027 days


#6 posted 08-09-2018 01:10 PM

Start by trying to find u a work space. Once u get it research benches and find one that works for u and build it. There’s folks on here that have a couple car garage as a workshop and some that have a balcony outside their apartment. Whatever space u have you CAN make it work. Your set up will be highly influenced by it tho.
Check out some Paul sellers videos. YouTube is a wealth of information so find out what you want to build and research it. You can post any questions you have here since there are some highly talented ppl here that can help u out

-- Whatsoever thy hand findeth to do, do it with all thy might

View  Newbie's profile

 Newbie

24 posts in 403 days


#7 posted 08-13-2018 07:51 PM

I want to send messages to some of the other members, but I have to make five posts first. I hope it’s okay to post this again. I’m new to the group. My family and I visited Colonial Williamsburg, Virginia this summer, and I fell in love with the cabinet shop there. I would like to get into that kind of woodworking, but have no idea how to start. Any direction would be appreciated.

View  Newbie's profile

 Newbie

24 posts in 403 days


#8 posted 08-23-2018 06:53 PM

WOW, in sending messages it seems as if all the truly hand tool folks have either left the site, been banned from the site, or died. I guess I should fine another source.

View John Smith's profile

John Smith

1969 posts in 639 days


#9 posted 08-23-2018 08:02 PM

do you like to read and look at pictures ??
visit your local library and spend some time in the carpentry and woodworking section.
this will guide you through the tools used and you may find a project within your
skill set. . . . the skill is not going to fall out of the sky into your lap.
you must have at least the basic hand and power tools as well as the ability to read
and understand drawings and plans.
seek out a woodworking club in your area and join it.
establish a “healthy” budget for tools and supplies. good quality tools are not cheap.
what projects have you built so far ?

.

-- I am a painter. That's what I do. I paint things --

View Smitty_Cabinetshop's profile

Smitty_Cabinetshop

16179 posts in 3095 days


#10 posted 08-23-2018 08:24 PM



WOW, in sending messages it seems as if all the truly hand tool folks have either left the site, been banned from the site, or died. I guess I should fine another source.

-  Newbie

Ron Aylor left, but there are bunches of others that primarily use hand tools.

-- Don't anthropomorphize your handplanes. They hate it when you do that. -- OldTools Archive --

View  Newbie's profile

 Newbie

24 posts in 403 days


#11 posted 09-01-2018 10:25 PM



Welcome to LJ s.

I am not a hand tool expert by any measure, but I watch one on YouTube by the name of Paul Sellers.

https://www.youtube.com/user/PaulSellersWoodwork

He seems to really know his stuff. While he probably owns every hand tool known to man, he has projects using little more than a single handsaw, plane, chisel and mallet. His videos and explanations are very clear. Just plain good stuff.

P.S. While Paul Sellers is a hand tool guy, he uses relatively modern hand tools (< 100 years old in most cases). So, perhaps isn t the guy to learn Colonial Williamsburg woodworking from.

I have seen PBS videos for a show I think it was called the “Woodright Shop”. He s stuff may not go quite that far back either, but it s pretty old technology he uses. Not sure if there are YouTube videos of that show.

- clin

Thank you! Yes, I have seen several videos by Paul Sellers. The Woodwright’s Shop is also great stuff. Thanks again.

View  Newbie's profile

 Newbie

24 posts in 403 days


#12 posted 09-01-2018 10:26 PM



”Please don t follow me … I don t know where I m going.” ... as your closing intro.
Great NEWS for you! We are here to help.
Just remember ALDER
Welcome

- Desert_Woodworker

Thank you. Why remember alder?

View  Newbie's profile

 Newbie

24 posts in 403 days


#13 posted 09-01-2018 10:27 PM



Welcome Unplugged. Remember this…………..everyone of us started with “I want to do that” in his/her mind, and none of us have quit learning.

- Bill White

Thank you.

View  Newbie's profile

 Newbie

24 posts in 403 days


#14 posted 09-01-2018 10:29 PM



I guess the first question is, do you have a workshop? If not, building one could really help you learn a few things about woodworking. Then think about the essentials; workbench, vise, storage, etc. Your bench needs to be pretty heavy duty since you will be doing a lot of pulling and pushing on it. Then comes the tools which you probably need to accumulate over time. When it comes to using only hand tools, consider purchasing the best tools (not the most expensive) by looking at the specs and reviews by pro who were not compensated by the company. Or ask others in the trade. Japan tools make some amazing hand tools but you probably want to use american made tools which can be a challenge. There are several individuals who make various traditional steel tools but I can t think of any right now(youtube it).
Welcome to LJ

- mahdee

Thank you. I have a corner of a two car garage that I can use. I would like to have a separate building one day.

View  Newbie's profile

 Newbie

24 posts in 403 days


#15 posted 09-01-2018 10:30 PM



Start by trying to find u a work space. Once u get it research benches and find one that works for u and build it. There’s folks on here that have a couple car garage as a workshop and some that have a balcony outside their apartment. Whatever space u have you CAN make it work. Your set up will be highly influenced by it tho.
Check out some Paul sellers videos. YouTube is a wealth of information so find out what you want to build and research it. You can post any questions you have here since there are some highly talented ppl here that can help u out

- JCamp


Thank you.

View  Newbie's profile

 Newbie

24 posts in 403 days


#16 posted 09-01-2018 10:32 PM



do you like to read and look at pictures ??
visit your local library and spend some time in the carpentry and woodworking section.
this will guide you through the tools used and you may find a project within your
skill set. . . . the skill is not going to fall out of the sky into your lap.
you must have at least the basic hand and power tools as well as the ability to read
and understand drawings and plans.
seek out a woodworking club in your area and join it.
establish a “healthy” budget for tools and supplies. good quality tools are not cheap.
what projects have you built so far ?

.

- John Smith


Thank you. I do. I just need to be told which books to read. LOL.

View  Newbie's profile

 Newbie

24 posts in 403 days


#17 posted 09-01-2018 10:33 PM


WOW, in sending messages it seems as if all the truly hand tool folks have either left the site, been banned from the site, or died. I guess I should fine another source.

-  Newbie

Ron Aylor left, but there are bunches of others that primarily use hand tools.

- Smitty_Cabinetshop


Thank you. I contacted him through his web page.

View diverlloyd's profile

diverlloyd

3592 posts in 2334 days


#18 posted 09-01-2018 10:59 PM


”Please don t follow me … I don t know where I m going.” ... as your closing intro.
Great NEWS for you! We are here to help.
Just remember ALDER
Welcome

- Desert_Woodworker

Thank you. Why remember alder?

-  Newbie


It’s a very stupid comment that a group of members make that leads new members astray. As in “can anyone help me identify this wood”. The comment no matter what the wood is will be alder. Because it’s so very helpful to misinform new members who have little knowledge about the hobby.

View Bill White's profile

Bill White

5224 posts in 4437 days


#19 posted 09-01-2018 11:02 PM

You don’t need to go elsewhere, but there are many sites more dedicated to hand tools.
Hang here for many great posts and info. You won’t be unhappy.
BTW, Williamsburg can leave you drooling because of the workmanship and time line craftsmanship you see there.
I could spend a week in the woodshop there if they’d not get sick of me and my questions.

-- [email protected]

View jacww's profile

jacww

38 posts in 1484 days


#20 posted 09-02-2018 01:25 AM

Newbie,

I am also interested in hand tool woodworking. Here are some resources that I have found where you can take classes in various hand tool techniques:

Classes
The Woodwright School – Roy Underhill’s school in Pittsboro, NC

Wood and Shop – Joshua T. Farnsworth’s Web site. He also operates a school in Earlysville, VA

Lost Art Press (LAP)- Christopher Schwartz’s Publishing Company also has a limited number of mostly had tool classes in Covington, KY. LAP also publishes books on the history of woodworking, woodworking techniques, and design related to woodworking.

John C. Campbell Folk School – Located in Brasstown, NC. Classes in much more than woodworking but worth a look.

There are many other places that have hand tool oriented classes around the country. I have attended classes at all but Wood and Shop and have enjoyed them and learned a lot.

Ron Aylor has a website now. It is called “An Unplugged Woodworker”. He updates the site frequently and all of his work is done with hand tools only. I do not know if he teaches classes.

Peter Follansbee is an expert in 17th century joinery. He teaches at the Woodwright School and other schools. His blog is worth the time.

Remember, Google is your friend. That is how I found many of these resources. Of course many were also found when members of this site mentioned them.

TonyC

View  Newbie's profile

 Newbie

24 posts in 403 days


#21 posted 09-02-2018 10:46 PM


”Please don t follow me … I don t know where I m going.” ... as your closing intro.
Great NEWS for you! We are here to help.
Just remember ALDER
Welcome

- Desert_Woodworker

Thank you. Why remember alder?

-  Newbie

It s a very stupid comment that a group of members make that leads new members astray. As in “can anyone help me identify this wood”. The comment no matter what the wood is will be alder. Because it s so very helpful to misinform new members who have little knowledge about the hobby.

- diverlloyd

I see. So shy away from the alder posts, right?

View  Newbie's profile

 Newbie

24 posts in 403 days


#22 posted 09-02-2018 10:50 PM


You don t need to go elsewhere, but there are many sites more dedicated to hand tools.
Hang here for many great posts and info. You won t be unhappy.
BTW, Williamsburg can leave you drooling because of the workmanship and time line craftsmanship you see there.
I could spend a week in the woodshop there if they d not get sick of me and my questions.

- Bill White


Thank you. Maybe for a little while.

View  Newbie's profile

 Newbie

24 posts in 403 days


#23 posted 09-02-2018 10:51 PM



Newbie,

I am also interested in hand tool woodworking. Here are some resources that I have found where you can take classes in various hand tool techniques:

Classes
The Woodwright School – Roy Underhill s school in Pittsboro, NC

Wood and Shop – Joshua T. Farnsworth s Web site. He also operates a school in Earlysville, VA

Lost Art Press (LAP)- Christopher Schwartz s Publishing Company also has a limited number of mostly had tool classes in Covington, KY. LAP also publishes books on the history of woodworking, woodworking techniques, and design related to woodworking.

John C. Campbell Folk School – Located in Brasstown, NC. Classes in much more than woodworking but worth a look.

There are many other places that have hand tool oriented classes around the country. I have attended classes at all but Wood and Shop and have enjoyed them and learned a lot.

Ron Aylor has a website now. It is called “An Unplugged Woodworker”. He updates the site frequently and all of his work is done with hand tools only. I do not know if he teaches classes.

Peter Follansbee is an expert in 17th century joinery. He teaches at the Woodwright School and other schools. His blog is worth the time.

Remember, Google is your friend. That is how I found many of these resources. Of course many were also found when members of this site mentioned them.

TonyC

- jacww


Great info! Thank you very much!

View bandit571's profile

bandit571

23574 posts in 3160 days


#24 posted 09-03-2018 12:16 AM

Or..visit the Dungeon Woodshop that I have…..I tend to post a few build threads in the BLOG section here…

Dungeon? Yes, because it is in a Basement….most cars have more room than I do…

-- A Planer? I'M the planer, this is what I use

View  Newbie's profile

 Newbie

24 posts in 403 days


#25 posted 09-03-2018 12:05 PM



Or..visit the Dungeon Woodshop that I have…..I tend to post a few build threads in the BLOG section here…

Dungeon? Yes, because it is in a Basement….most cars have more room than I do…

- bandit571


Thank you, I will.

View bondogaposis's profile

bondogaposis

5513 posts in 2827 days


#26 posted 09-03-2018 01:15 PM

Welcome to LJ. To get started, you need a place to work. Once you figure that out, build something, a good start would be a pair of saw horses or saw benches. You are going to need some tools to make them so acquire them. You can throw a couple of planks on the saw horses and you now have a work surface. This is where it begins.

-- Bondo Gaposis

View Planeman40's profile

Planeman40

1437 posts in 3237 days


#27 posted 09-03-2018 03:42 PM

I recommend you contact a friend of mine who is into this kind of woodworking. He eschews electricity to his workshop working by daylight and candle light by night, uses only 200 year old woodworking tools and methods, and builds all of “machines” from wood. Interesting guy and excellent woodworker. Here is his website blog. https://ronaylor.wordpress.com/

-- Always remember: It is a mathematical certainty that half the people in this country are below average in intelligence!

View  Newbie's profile

 Newbie

24 posts in 403 days


#28 posted 09-03-2018 09:57 PM



Welcome to LJ. To get started, you need a place to work. Once you figure that out, build something, a good start would be a pair of saw horses or saw benches. You are going to need some tools to make them so acquire them. You can throw a couple of planks on the saw horses and you now have a work surface. This is where it begins.

- bondogaposis


Thank you. I am making a saw bench.

View  Newbie's profile

 Newbie

24 posts in 403 days


#29 posted 09-03-2018 09:58 PM



I recommend you contact a friend of mine who is into this kind of woodworking. He eschews electricity to his workshop working by daylight and candle light by night, uses only 200 year old woodworking tools and methods, and builds all of “machines” from wood. Interesting guy and excellent woodworker. Here is his website blog. https://ronaylor.wordpress.com/

- Planeman40


Thank you. I have been to the site. Great stuff!

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