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Supershop owners

by Dan Krager
posted 07-21-2018 01:08 AM


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267 replies

267 replies so far

View JethrowClampett's profile

JethrowClampett

24 posts in 252 days


#51 posted 03-06-2019 09:00 PM



My drill bits just skate right off it that weld. Considering my options now. Try to find a portable magnetic drill press to rent? Or remove the entire beast off the stand and take it to a machine shop? So close…and yet so far.
- merrill77

Grind the weld point where you want to drill. Then drill.

-- Jethrow

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merrill77

211 posts in 2396 days


#52 posted 03-06-2019 09:48 PM


Grind the weld point where you want to drill. Then drill.

- JethrowClampett

Do you mean to grind a starter hole? I’ll try that next time. Thanks.

-- Turning beautiful wood into scraps...one board at a time --Chris

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JethrowClampett

24 posts in 252 days


#53 posted 03-06-2019 10:09 PM


Grind the weld point where you want to drill. Then drill.

- JethrowClampett

Do you mean to grind a starter hole? I ll try that next time. Thanks.

- merrill77

Yes grind the weld point flat so the bit doesn’t skate !

-- Jethrow

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Dan Krager

4420 posts in 2744 days


#54 posted 03-07-2019 01:54 PM

Merrill, you have the machine base pretty well weighted according to the picture, but in my own shop I would be real concerned about balance. To do milling work I put about 200 lbs of fixtures on the carriage (to the point where I worry about breaking out the T-slots) and if it were turned crossways as you have it, it would certainly topple. I’m glad the machine has the flexibility to better suit your needs!

DanK

-- Dan Krager, Olney IL http://www.kragerwoodworking.weebly.com All my life I've wanted to be someone. I see now I should have been more specific.

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Dan Krager

4420 posts in 2744 days


#55 posted 03-07-2019 02:09 PM

Regarding threads on the headstock, the original Fox machines were standard acme bolt threads 2” x 4 TPI and if you have enough money you can buy stock hex nuts that fit. BTDT. It’s not common thread for headstocks, that’s for sure!

I can’t explain why the manufacturers after Fox changed the headstock spindle to another uncommon size, but there must be a reason.

Thanks for the detailed pictures!

DanK

-- Dan Krager, Olney IL http://www.kragerwoodworking.weebly.com All my life I've wanted to be someone. I see now I should have been more specific.

View HokieKen's profile

HokieKen

10933 posts in 1648 days


#56 posted 03-07-2019 04:41 PM

Hey folks. I don’t have one of these machines but I stumbled on this post on CL in Pheonix this morning and thought I’d post it here for y’all. $600 for a complete setup with all attachments.

https://phoenix.craigslist.org/nph/tls/d/phoenix-fox-super-shop/6832853296.html

-- Kenny, SW VA, Go Hokies!!!

View JethrowClampett's profile

JethrowClampett

24 posts in 252 days


#57 posted 03-07-2019 05:12 PM



I put about 200 lbs of fixtures on the carriage (to the point where I worry about breaking out the T-slots) and if it were turned crossways as you have it, it would certainly topple.
- Dan Krager

Dan, I think he could put a safety cable from head stock to anchored in the wall. I would lower the head stock on heavy stuff or moving.

-- Jethrow

View merrill77's profile

merrill77

211 posts in 2396 days


#58 posted 03-07-2019 06:56 PM

I don’t typically put anything big and heavy on the drill press table. Were I going to do that, I would probably just switch to horizontal mode. I made a folding wheeled stand for the tool cabinet that sits on the base, so switching only takes a few minutes.

-- Turning beautiful wood into scraps...one board at a time --Chris

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merrill77

211 posts in 2396 days


#59 posted 03-07-2019 06:57 PM



Hey folks. I don t have one of these machines but I stumbled on this post on CL in Pheonix this morning and thought I d post it here for y all. $600 for a complete setup with all attachments.

https://phoenix.craigslist.org/nph/tls/d/phoenix-fox-super-shop/6832853296.html

- HokieKen

Thanks, Ken. Looks to be in good shape. Better than my older Fox machine.

-- Turning beautiful wood into scraps...one board at a time --Chris

View Dan Krager's profile

Dan Krager

4420 posts in 2744 days


#60 posted 03-07-2019 10:36 PM

That’s a very good deal, Ken. Should be snapped up!

DanK

-- Dan Krager, Olney IL http://www.kragerwoodworking.weebly.com All my life I've wanted to be someone. I see now I should have been more specific.

View JethrowClampett's profile

JethrowClampett

24 posts in 252 days


#61 posted 03-09-2019 06:47 PM

Where can I get a wood turning face plate for the Smithy Super Shop ?

-- Jethrow

View Dan Krager's profile

Dan Krager

4420 posts in 2744 days


#62 posted 03-09-2019 07:17 PM

If you have the 12” sanding disc that usually came with these machines, you already have one. Unscrew the 4” diameter plate with the stem and use wood screws in the 4 holes to hold the blank.

DanK

-- Dan Krager, Olney IL http://www.kragerwoodworking.weebly.com All my life I've wanted to be someone. I see now I should have been more specific.

View JethrowClampett's profile

JethrowClampett

24 posts in 252 days


#63 posted 03-09-2019 09:50 PM

Thanks Dan, yes I have the sanding disk, great idea !

-- Jethrow

View merrill77's profile

merrill77

211 posts in 2396 days


#64 posted 03-13-2019 02:05 AM

Who can explain how to use the depth stop? I see how to adjust and tighten it, so that it stops the quill. But I’m thinking the sticker was installed incorrectly because I can’t find a use-case where those numbers can be applied in a helpful way.

As an example, following the instructions in the manual, I lower the bit to touch the top of my workpiece. Then set the gauge to 1” and tighten the wheel (making sure the measurement does not move in the process). When I then lower the quill further, it stops roughly 3/4” below the surface of the workpiece.

-- Turning beautiful wood into scraps...one board at a time --Chris

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Dan Krager

4420 posts in 2744 days


#65 posted 03-13-2019 10:53 PM

Did the indicator dial stop at 0 when the quill stopped, or did it still show 1/4” left to travel?

My bet is that the quill has been removed and did not get returned in the same teeth it was shipped with. The tip off is that those teeth are in the vicinity of 1/4” apart as the dial rotates (not on the quill itself). The ring markers are approximate, but should be within 1/8” or less for sure.

I’ve found myself “tightening” the stop the wrong direction. From the front of the machine, the tightening ring should be turned counter clockwise to tighten the stop properly.

Also, remove the handle and rings from the back side to see if there is foreign material not letting the stop full travel. It’s possible it was not reassembled correctly.

You com up with the oddest issues! LOL. Never have seen this one either.

DanK

-- Dan Krager, Olney IL http://www.kragerwoodworking.weebly.com All my life I've wanted to be someone. I see now I should have been more specific.

View HokieKen's profile

HokieKen

10933 posts in 1648 days


#66 posted 03-14-2019 01:00 PM



Hey folks. I don t have one of these machines but I stumbled on this post on CL in Pheonix this morning and thought I d post it here for y all. $600 for a complete setup with all attachments.

https://phoenix.craigslist.org/nph/tls/d/phoenix-fox-super-shop/6832853296.html

- HokieKen

Dropped another $100 to $500 asking.

-- Kenny, SW VA, Go Hokies!!!

View merrill77's profile

merrill77

211 posts in 2396 days


#67 posted 03-15-2019 01:49 AM

The indicator doesn’t reach zero when it stops.

I’ve already had the depth-stop ring off…as with the rest of the machine, it is neat and clean inside.

Interesting thought on the quill removal…I’ll have to think about that.

When I turn the depth-stop ring fully clockwise, it stops here:

And fully counter-clockwise:

That is where it stops when in use, instead of at zero.

Are the indicated numbers the same where your ring stops? TIA!

-- Turning beautiful wood into scraps...one board at a time --Chris

View JethrowClampett's profile

JethrowClampett

24 posts in 252 days


#68 posted 03-15-2019 03:52 PM

Merrill, I would pull that tape off, if possible, and retape back on, a steam iron would soften up the glue. If not possible, pick up a strip of writable stick on tape, tape it on, measure and mark. I had the same problem with mine. Plus I don’t trust the calibration out of the box, I measured and reset everything.

If you want true accuracy get a set of drill stop collars $7.

-- Jethrow

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merrill77

211 posts in 2396 days


#69 posted 03-15-2019 05:18 PM

Thanks, Jethrow – I wanted to confirm that the placement is incorrect before doing that…since I’m not even sure if I’m using the feature correctly. Thanks for the tip on heating the sticker…I hadn’t considered that. I have a heat gun, so I’ll try that.

-- Turning beautiful wood into scraps...one board at a time --Chris

View Dan Krager's profile

Dan Krager

4420 posts in 2744 days


#70 posted 03-15-2019 08:04 PM

Merrill, another thought. Perhaps the ring is on backwards and is on the wrong side of the stop.

DanK

-- Dan Krager, Olney IL http://www.kragerwoodworking.weebly.com All my life I've wanted to be someone. I see now I should have been more specific.

View JethrowClampett's profile

JethrowClampett

24 posts in 252 days


#71 posted 03-17-2019 01:36 PM

Merrill, I measured the actual calibration against the factory tape markings. The factory tape is inaccurate on my machine. One inch on the tape is just under an inch on the stock shaft movement. There is a little play on the hand lever, I even adjusted for that. For real accuracy you could also mark the shaft.

-- Jethrow

View merrill77's profile

merrill77

211 posts in 2396 days


#72 posted 03-20-2019 06:39 PM

Thanks!

I noted another difference between my two SuperShops, as I was prepping my older (Fox) unit for sale. When I first set it up I had noted, with annoyance, that the miter gauge slots in the table were a non-standard size (1” IIRC) so that gauges from other tools or 3rd parties could not be used on it. On my newer unit (Smithy), the miter gauge slots are compatible with all the other tools in my shop. Yay!

Last – a question about tightening the quill travel wheels. What kind of tool can you use to adjust this? It is a 1” nut, but a 1” socket doesn’t fit in there :(

The wheel on the other side has a smaller shaft and nut, so that one was no problem. This one has me puzzled.

-- Turning beautiful wood into scraps...one board at a time --Chris

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JethrowClampett

24 posts in 252 days


#73 posted 03-20-2019 07:17 PM

Merrill, Use a thin walled socket, like they use in spark plugs removal. There usually deep sockets that have to fit in recessed areas.

-- Jethrow

View DantheToolman's profile

DantheToolman

35 posts in 394 days


#74 posted 03-20-2019 07:22 PM

Hey folks. I don t have one of these machines but I stumbled on this post on CL in Pheonix this morning and thought I d post it here for y all. $600 for a complete setup with all attachments.

https://phoenix.craigslist.org/nph/tls/d/phoenix-fox-super-shop/6832853296.html

Wish it was closer and I would go for it. I am watching for one closer to Knoxville and would prefer the Fox version. Mine has the motorized carriage and I see possibilities…......

Merrill77- I like the turning base- nicely done. So you say yuou want to sell your Fox SuperShop? I think we need to talk. ;+D

-- When someone tells me that can't be done, I think they are challenging me.....

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merrill77

211 posts in 2396 days


#75 posted 03-20-2019 08:54 PM


Merrill, Use a thin walled socket, like they use in spark plugs removal. There usually deep sockets that have to fit in recessed areas.

I’ll look for one of those. I just bought a 1” socket…I didn’t know ‘thin-walled’ socket was a thing. Thanks!


Hey folks. I don t have one of these machines but I stumbled on this post on CL in Pheonix this morning and thought I d post it here for y all. $600 for a complete setup with all attachments.
...
So you say yuou want to sell your Fox SuperShop? I think we need to talk. ;+D

That ad was posted 2 weeks ago on this thread. Mine sold in 2 days for about the same price…and mine was in much rougher condition. I had 4 people interested…one of them texted me daily, while the sale was pending, wanting to know if the sale went through. Which just goes to show: a well-written ad can make a big difference. Nobody knows what these things are…ya gotta explain it if you want it to sell.

-- Turning beautiful wood into scraps...one board at a time --Chris

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merrill77

211 posts in 2396 days


#76 posted 03-26-2019 10:58 PM

Dan – how did you mount your 3 jaw chuck? With the spindle threads or using the R8 collett system?

I’ve found one baseplate adapter for my 2-1/4×8 spindle threads – but that seems to be a pretty uncommon size. Just wondering what most people have done (as if there is more than 5 of us…).

-- Turning beautiful wood into scraps...one board at a time --Chris

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Dan Krager

4420 posts in 2744 days


#77 posted 03-27-2019 03:24 PM

I had a base plate custom machined for the chuck and spindle threads. The threads are standard ACME threads on the Fox machines, so not difficult to match. In fact, if you have enough money, you can buy an ACME hex nut that will fit, but it’s not cost effective. You’ll still need machining. The R-8 won’t provide the torque and stability of a spindle mounted chuck.

10-4 on the rarity. You can’t pick these things up at Walmart, or any other big box (BORG) store for that matter. They don’t sell Bridgeports either, so we go to where machinists hang out. Tony Fox used several of his machines set up as lathes and mills to make parts for the machine, so that inspires me to do the same from time to time. The good news is that I haven’t needed much.

And the irony is that I chickened out on machining a new shaft for my post hole digger! There were some tight tolerances on the head end that I didn’t think I could achieve, so I thought $75 was well spent.

DanK

-- Dan Krager, Olney IL http://www.kragerwoodworking.weebly.com All my life I've wanted to be someone. I see now I should have been more specific.

View JethrowClampett's profile

JethrowClampett

24 posts in 252 days


#78 posted 03-27-2019 04:23 PM

Dan, I was thinking the same thing. I’d rather turn on the spindle thread than on the collet for big bowels and heavy legs and machining. I figure that machining and adaptor would be reasonable. I wouldn’t be surprised that Smithy carries or knows of a vendor that manufacturers one.

-- Jethrow

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Dan Krager

4420 posts in 2744 days


#79 posted 03-27-2019 05:24 PM

I was referring to a metal lathe chuck as I made the comments. I have a large Nova chuck mounted on a custom R-8 whose threads match the Nova native thread without adapter and nests in the taper that centers the chuck.. Works the best of all I’ve tried short of a custom back plate, which the Nova’s are not configured to use. I’ve tried an R-8 MT-2 with adapter to the Nova, but it wouldn’t stay put under heavy load and tossed a large bowl at me. A straight shank adapter at 3/4” did better, but still liked to slip under heavy cutting on large diameters. R-8 collets do not have large gripping surfaces and weren’t designed to turn large heavy loads, I think. On a Bridgeport, the largest diameter used might be a boring bar, but the R-8 on those heads is integral to the bar holding head, so no slippage is possible. Perhaps one could note a difference in purpose between R-8 collet and R-8 adapter, the latter being integral or nearly so to whatever it is driving.

My local machine shop likes me.

DanK

-- Dan Krager, Olney IL http://www.kragerwoodworking.weebly.com All my life I've wanted to be someone. I see now I should have been more specific.

View merrill77's profile

merrill77

211 posts in 2396 days


#80 posted 03-27-2019 07:46 PM

My target would be woodworking, but I’d love the capability to do metalwork at some point.

I came across this back plate adapter which fits my thread (need to double-check). https://littlemachineshop.com/products/product_view.php?ProductID=1923

But I am not sure I understand this part:

These adapters require machining on the lathe on which they will be used.

Does that mean that I need to buy some tooling and do some work just to get this trued before use?

-- Turning beautiful wood into scraps...one board at a time --Chris

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Dan Krager

4420 posts in 2744 days


#81 posted 03-28-2019 03:13 AM

I keep forgetting that some of the reproductions used standard 60° threads, not ACME. So, if the thread spec matches, it should screw on OK. The machining required is the registration diameter and the bolt holes. Nova chucks cannot be mounted to a plate.

I don’t recommend using a three jaw or four jaw metal machining chucks for woodworking. Some issues to consider are that the metal machining jaws are really harsh on the wood. They do not hold wood securely like a dovetail quarter circle will. They are not restricted in any way so they will open up far enough to let the jaws protrude beyond the chuck. That is just like sticking your hand in a shaper cutter! You definitely should not use them in a recess to expand hold the wood. The narrow focus of the jaws is just too much strain on the wood at contact points. Can you say “KaBoom”? :)

Having said that, I’ve used them in a pinch when I had nothing else better. The best alternative that will take you far down the bowl turning road is a wooden face plate, and a Longworth plate for finishing the foot. A wooden jam chuck is good for tiny spindles.

DanK

-- Dan Krager, Olney IL http://www.kragerwoodworking.weebly.com All my life I've wanted to be someone. I see now I should have been more specific.

View jeruedas's profile

jeruedas

7 posts in 739 days


#82 posted 04-22-2019 06:56 PM

I wonder if any body has experienced a problem that I am having with the Smithy SuperShop. I bought it a state sale years ago and have not really use it for much since the motor is too weak. Meaning it bugs down with any drilling and I can stop it with my hands. Initially had a problem that he motor did not run continuously but stutter. I came across a way to adjusting the problem by moving the dial in the 110V controller for the motor. These are 4 “dials” that are under the motor. I have a printout that tell me how to set it up initially. I wonder if anybody has come across similar issue where the motor has no power. It speeds and responds to the velocity changes from the control, but the motor does not have that much torque. I mean I place a 1/2 forstner bit to drill a piece of cherrywood and it stop the motor. Any ideas will be appreciated.
Enrique

-- Enrique Rueda

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merrill77

211 posts in 2396 days


#83 posted 04-22-2019 07:08 PM

There is a problem with your machine. I can spin a big forstner bit through hard wood and it doesn’t bog down. A 1.5hp DC motor, when operating properly, should not be stoppable by human hands.

I used one of those dials to adjust the “zero” speed, but I have otherwise not looked into them. Maybe it needs adjustment…or maybe the controller is faulty.

-- Turning beautiful wood into scraps...one board at a time --Chris

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jeruedas

7 posts in 739 days


#84 posted 04-24-2019 03:29 PM

Thanks merrill77, I did look at the dials and seems they have change since I first set it up. Also, this morning I noticed that there is a problem with the belt. Seems that it has been slipping for a while and is shot and rubbery. I am going to replace it and check the dials this afternoon. I did check and the motor is rotating, I will feel stupid if it ends up being a belt issue. And happy that it will be only a few dollars. Thanks for your fast response.

-- Enrique Rueda

View Ted724's profile

Ted724

63 posts in 2165 days


#85 posted 04-25-2019 07:09 PM

In reviewing the posts regarding the Supershop, I noticed that someone was asking about videos on the machine. I located some short videos by Smithy at https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLD8444AFC55B12F5D Just page down a bit and you’ll find them.

I noticed also there was some interest in mounting chucks etc., to the Supershop and thought I’d pass along how I’ve done that. I simply got a length of 5/8” drill rod, sawed off a length, and used a hacksaw, dremel, and file to create s Shopsmith-like “tapered flat” on one end. Mounted this in a 5/8” R8 collet and can then mount Shopsmith accessories like drill chucks, lathe drive center, saw blades, dado set, disk sander, shaper cutters, face plates, etc. I’ve also mounted a Nova chuck using the appropriate Shopsmith-to=Nova Chuck adapter.

For lathe turning small items between centers (like a pen), I made a second Shopsmith-like spindle that is just longer than the one mentioned above. This goes in the headstock with a Shopsmith drive center. In the tailstock, I added a morse taper #2—TO—morse taper #2 extension (this has a male mt2 on one end and a female mt2 on the other). This allows you turn small items between centers that wouldn’t be possible otherwise because of the width of the Supershop carriage.

I also adapted a Shopsmith tool rest to fit into the vertical tube of the Supershop tool rest so that I could mount narrow tool rests on the Supershop. Bought a set of three tool rests from PennState Industries that fit using the included sleeve into the Shopsmith toolrest arm.

View JethrowClampett's profile

JethrowClampett

24 posts in 252 days


#86 posted 04-26-2019 07:07 PM



In reviewing the posts regarding the Supershop, I noticed that someone was asking about videos on the machine. I located some short videos by Smithy at https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLD8444AFC55B12F5D Just page down a bit and you ll find them.

I noticed also there was some interest in mounting chucks etc., to the Supershop and thought I d pass along how I ve done that. I simply got a length of 5/8” drill rod, sawed off a length, and used a hacksaw, dremel, and file to create s Shopsmith-like “tapered flat” on one end. Mounted this in a 5/8” R8 collet and can then mount Shopsmith accessories like drill chucks, lathe drive center, saw blades, dado set, disk sander, shaper cutters, face plates, etc. I ve also mounted a Nova chuck using the appropriate Shopsmith-to=Nova Chuck adapter.

For lathe turning small items between centers (like a pen), I made a second Shopsmith-like spindle that is just longer than the one mentioned above. This goes in the headstock with a Shopsmith drive center. In the tailstock, I added a morse taper #2—TO—morse taper #2 extension (this has a male mt2 on one end and a female mt2 on the other). This allows you turn small items between centers that wouldn t be possible otherwise because of the width of the Supershop carriage.

I also adapted a Shopsmith tool rest to fit into the vertical tube of the Supershop tool rest so that I could mount narrow tool rests on the Supershop. Bought a set of three tool rests from PennState Industries that fit using the included sleeve into the Shopsmith toolrest arm.

- Ted724

Ted724 – WARNING – the Shopsmith Taper is not flat. The taper is a flat progressive taper toward the headstock. That way when you tighten the set screw, if the screw is slightly loose the attachment can’t fall off.

-- Jethrow

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Ted724

63 posts in 2165 days


#87 posted 04-26-2019 07:17 PM


In reviewing the posts regarding the Supershop, I noticed that someone was asking about videos on the machine. I located some short videos by Smithy at https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLD8444AFC55B12F5D Just page down a bit and you ll find them.

I noticed also there was some interest in mounting chucks etc., to the Supershop and thought I d pass along how I ve done that. I simply got a length of 5/8” drill rod, sawed off a length, and used a hacksaw, dremel, and file to create s Shopsmith-like “tapered flat” on one end. Mounted this in a 5/8” R8 collet and can then mount Shopsmith accessories like drill chucks, lathe drive center, saw blades, dado set, disk sander, shaper cutters, face plates, etc. I ve also mounted a Nova chuck using the appropriate Shopsmith-to=Nova Chuck adapter.

For lathe turning small items between centers (like a pen), I made a second Shopsmith-like spindle that is just longer than the one mentioned above. This goes in the headstock with a Shopsmith drive center. In the tailstock, I added a morse taper #2—TO—morse taper #2 extension (this has a male mt2 on one end and a female mt2 on the other). This allows you turn small items between centers that wouldn t be possible otherwise because of the width of the Supershop carriage.

I also adapted a Shopsmith tool rest to fit into the vertical tube of the Supershop tool rest so that I could mount narrow tool rests on the Supershop. Bought a set of three tool rests from PennState Industries that fit using the included sleeve into the Shopsmith toolrest arm.

- Ted724

Ted724 – WARNING – the Shopsmith Taper is not flat. The taper is a flat progressive taper toward the headstock. That way when you tighten the set screw, if the screw is slightly loose the attachment can t fall off.

- JethrowClampett


Exactly, Jethrow, that’s why I referred to it as a “tapered flat.” That’s the same terminology that Shopsmith uses.

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Ted724

63 posts in 2165 days


#88 posted 04-26-2019 07:27 PM

For those looking for a chuck to mount on the spindle threads of the Smithy Supershop with it’s 2 1/4” x 8 TPI spindle, there are over 100 items listed on ebay today, so perhaps there is something there that will fit the bill. Simply search on ebay for “2 1/4 chuck.”

View JethrowClampett's profile

JethrowClampett

24 posts in 252 days


#89 posted 04-26-2019 07:31 PM

Ted742 – I think your better off ordering one from Shopsmith, there precisely machined for the attachments. A drill rod does not have 1/2 the strength for what your doing. It will snap at some time and you’ll have a bad accident. All metals are not created equal. Be safe !

-- Jethrow

View Ted724's profile

Ted724

63 posts in 2165 days


#90 posted 04-26-2019 07:53 PM


In reviewing the posts regarding the Supershop, I noticed that someone was asking about videos on the machine. I located some short videos by Smithy at https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLD8444AFC55B12F5D Just page down a bit and you ll find them.

I noticed also there was some interest in mounting chucks etc., to the Supershop and thought I d pass along how I ve done that. I simply got a length of 5/8” drill rod, sawed off a length, and used a hacksaw, dremel, and file to create s Shopsmith-like “tapered flat” on one end. Mounted this in a 5/8” R8 collet and can then mount Shopsmith accessories like drill chucks, lathe drive center, saw blades, dado set, disk sander, shaper cutters, face plates, etc. I ve also mounted a Nova chuck using the appropriate Shopsmith-to=Nova Chuck adapter.

For lathe turning small items between centers (like a pen), I made a second Shopsmith-like spindle that is just longer than the one mentioned above. This goes in the headstock with a Shopsmith drive center. In the tailstock, I added a morse taper #2—TO—morse taper #2 extension (this has a male mt2 on one end and a female mt2 on the other). This allows you turn small items between centers that wouldn t be possible otherwise because of the width of the Supershop carriage.

I also adapted a Shopsmith tool rest to fit into the vertical tube of the Supershop tool rest so that I could mount narrow tool rests on the Supershop. Bought a set of three tool rests from PennState Industries that fit using the included sleeve into the Shopsmith toolrest arm.

- Ted724

Ted724 – WARNING – the Shopsmith Taper is not flat. The taper is a flat progressive taper toward the headstock. That way when you tighten the set screw, if the screw is slightly loose the attachment can t fall off.

- JethrowClampett

Exactly, Jethrow, that s why I referred to it as a “tapered flat.” That s the same terminology that Shopsmith uses.

- Ted724

Here are a couple of photos showing the Shopsmith-like spindle adapter I’m using with the Supershop along with the modification to the tool rest. The smaller spindle adapter is about 3 3/8’ long. The longer one is about 7 5/8” long. In the longer one, you can see how the “flat” is tapered. Also shown is the MT2 to MT2 extension that accepts the live center in the tailstock.

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Ted724

63 posts in 2165 days


#91 posted 04-26-2019 08:03 PM



Ted742 – I think your better off ordering one from Shopsmith, there precisely machined for the attachments. A drill rod does not have 1/2 the strength for what your doing. It will snap at some time and you ll have a bad accident. All metals are not created equal. Be safe !

- JethrowClampett


Jethrow, thanks for you concern, but I’m not worried in the least. I’m using O-1 drill rod. It’s tool steel. Not exactly whimpy stuff.

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JethrowClampett

24 posts in 252 days


#92 posted 04-26-2019 09:26 PM

Ted724 – The only way you can compare the tapers is have a Shopsmith next to your taper. I have both machines, an I don’t recall the Shopsmith taper that pronounced. I don’t know the engineering aspects of tapers, but each taper has specific pitches etc. for an underlying purpose. If you have a person in your area that has a Shopsmith you will see the difference. The machine metal in Shopsmith doesn’t contain as much chromium and has more carbon content. Chromium causes the shine in the steel, also making the surface less abrasive. Shopsmith steel is black and has less chromium and more carbon. The surface is abrasive, thus the set screw can dig into the metal, giving it a lock-washer effect. Less chance for the set screw (low chromium – higher carbon) to come loose.

-- Jethrow

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Ted724

63 posts in 2165 days


#93 posted 04-26-2019 10:00 PM



Ted724 – The only way you can compare the tapers is have a Shopsmith next to your taper. I have both machines, an I don t recall the Shopsmith taper that pronounced. I don t know the engineering aspects of tapers, but each taper has specific pitches etc. for an underlying purpose. If you have a person in your area that has a Shopsmith you will see the difference. The machine metal in Shopsmith doesn t contain as much chromium and has more carbon content. Chromium causes the shine in the steel, also making the surface less abrasive. Shopsmith steel is black and has less chromium and more carbon. The surface is abrasive, thus the set screw can dig into the metal, giving it a lock-washer effect. Less chance for the set screw to come loose. When you have a collet system you will have more chromium otherwise the collet will freeze up.

- JethrowClampett


Jethrow, again thanks for your concern. but you need not worry. I[‘ve had Shopsmith equipment since 1980. In fact. I own more Shopsmith equipment than I’d care to admit. (I really should start selling the stuff off). And, I have both a Fox and Smithy Supershop.

The drill rod spindles I’ve made are more than adequate for for what I use them for, which is mostly turning. For heavier items I can always use the 6” 3-jaw chuck or 10” faceplate I have that screw onto the Smithy 2 1/4” threaded spindle.

I believe in your comments that you say the Shopsmith setscrew can dig into the Shopsmith spindle. If that’s your view, it’s exactly opposite of my experience. The setscrew leaves no mark in any Shopsmith spindle I’ve ever used; they’re quite hard. It does dig into the drill rods, however.

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JethrowClampett

24 posts in 252 days


#94 posted 04-26-2019 10:16 PM

Ted724 This is what a Shopsmith taper looks like. Quite different from yours. You can see where the set screw dug into the metal. Have a good weekend !

-- Jethrow

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Ted724

63 posts in 2165 days


#95 posted 04-27-2019 01:17 AM


Ted724 This is what a Shopsmith taper looks like. Quite different from yours. You can see where the set screw dug into the metal. Have a good weekend !

- JethrowClampett

I know, Jethrow.
Here are what my Shopsmith spindles look like:

This is from my Greenie Shorty


This is from my Mark VII (the old Mark VII)


This is from my Mark V 510


This is from my 1980s Mark V

This is a spindle removed from a Greenie


this is my Drill Rod spindle mounted in the Supershop—notice the scoring on the “tapered flat”


This was sawn off of a Shopsmith spindle— I deemed it too short so made the Drill Rod version
Edit: I meant to add that if a set screw is damaging or chewing up a Shopsmith spindle, it’s probably because the wrong set screw is being used. More likely the cause is use of a Knurl-Grip Set Screw that has a serrated end and meant to bite into a spindle, but not something that comes with Shopsmith stuff.


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merrill77

211 posts in 2396 days


#96 posted 04-29-2019 05:20 PM


I also adapted a Shopsmith tool rest to fit into the vertical tube of the Supershop tool rest so that I could mount narrow tool rests on the Supershop. Bought a set of three tool rests from PennState Industries that fit using the included sleeve into the Shopsmith toolrest arm.

I’d like to hear more about this. I already have the MT2 extension for this purpose, but had not (yet) realized that I’d also need a smaller tool rest. What modifications did you have to make? Are all the Shopsmith tool rest arms the same? (i.e. if I pick up one off CL, do I need to look for something specific?)

TIA!

-- Turning beautiful wood into scraps...one board at a time --Chris

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jeruedas

7 posts in 739 days


#97 posted 04-29-2019 06:21 PM

A new belt did the job for my issue. It seems that the belt got stretched and was too long for the amount of space on the tighten lever to pull it to the right tension. Thanks to all.

-- Enrique Rueda

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Ted724

63 posts in 2165 days


#98 posted 04-29-2019 07:29 PM

I also adapted a Shopsmith tool rest to fit into the vertical tube of the Supershop tool rest so that I could mount narrow tool rests on the Supershop. Bought a set of three tool rests from PennState Industries that fit using the included sleeve into the Shopsmith toolrest arm.

I d like to hear more about this. I already have the MT2 extension for this purpose, but had not (yet) realized that I d also need a smaller tool rest. What modifications did you have to make? Are all the Shopsmith tool rest arms the same? (i.e. if I pick up one off CL, do I need to look for something specific?)

TIA!

- merrill77

Whether you need a smaller toolrest or not depends on the length of what you’re turning, as well as how close you can get the toolrest to the wood. I adapted the Shopsmith toolrest arm before I got the MT2 extension, so it’s possible there’s no need for the adaptation. You just have to see if the Supershop toolrest along with the extension allows you to turn whatever you’re turning.

In any event, I had to machine a steel plug to fit into the top of the Supershop’s vertical tube of the tool rest, with the other end sized to fit into the Shopsmith arm.

Here’s a look at the Shopsmith arm. It has two places to fit the plug I machined, but you only really need the one in the back. This is the later version of the Shopsmith toolrest arm. The earlier model only had one hole and would work just as well, although the second hole would come in handy if you were turning some larger diameter stuff.

I just use this set-up for turning an occasional pen or in this case some bottle openers.

Here’s how I have it set up for turning the bottle openers. I’m using the drill rod with tapered flat in a 5/8” R8 collet, then there is a Shopsmith drill chuck, and then there is a threaded mandrill with a couple of nuts that’s made from a 3/8” bolt. The wood blank is threaded to accept the threaded mandrill 3/8” 16 TPI.

One thing I did notice about the Smithy toolrest is that the diameter of the shaft on the bottom of the toolrest itself is 26 millimeter, so it’s an odd size for trying to find narrower toolrests. The Penn State Industries toolrest set I got have 5/8” diameter shafts, but come with a sleeve to fit into the Shopsmith 3/4” hole. That’s why I adapted the Shopsmith arm. Also, the rack teeth on the vertical tube on the Smithy is different pitch than the one of the Fox.

On another topic, someone earlier asked about any differences in the Shopsmith and Smithy accessory tools. I only have the Smithy bandsaw and the major difference is that the Smithy uses a conventional method for tracking blades whereby you tilt the upper wheel to get the blade to track properly. The Smithy owners manual incorrectly states that tracking is automatic. The Shopsmith does have this automatic tracking (if you want to call it that) whereby a double bearing located near the tensioning mechanism is used to keep the blade from coming off the back of the upper wheel. There’s a bearing below the table that helps in this regard.

The Smithy bandsaw was made in Taiwan, likely for one of the Shopsmith clones like the Total Shop. To fit into the Smithy Supershop, they added an adapter. The Shopsmith front cover is plastic, the Smithy is cast aluminum. The horizontal and vertical cutting capacities of the Smithy are a bit less than those on the Shopsmith. The miter gauge slots are different as well.

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DantheToolman

35 posts in 394 days


#99 posted 04-30-2019 07:48 PM

Merrill77-
Shopsmith tool rests come in 2 flavors primarily. The model 500 and model 505/510/520. The 505/510/520 has a longer arm because of the wider table down-tubes are farther apart than on the M500s. Both have the same sized shaft for mounting into the carriages.

For the Fox I recently aquired it was missing a bunch of stuff so I cut off a quill from a junk one I had. (I repair Shopsmith tools so seem to always have an abundance of lots of extra stuff). The end is 5/8” with the tapered flat, but behind that it went to 3/4” rod. What I noticed is the 5/8 part does not spin concentric so I suspect the 3/4” part is not in same concentric plane as the 5/8”. It basically floats in the quill between the bearing and the spacer so I am looking for some good 5/8” shaft stuff to make some nice 5/8” shafts. Tedd724, where did you get your 5/8 material for the shafts you made?

I too have much Shopsmith stuff and just aquired a Fox SuperShop and last Friday picked up a Smithy SuperShop. The extra long lathe earlier in this post (Sammy Sosa lathe for coring baseball bats) I think I am going to sell cause I never use it for the length. It can turn just short of 7.5 feet in length. I am going to keep most of my Shopsmith stuff (mostly the minis I have set as saw & sanding stations) and replace with the SuperShops for lathe and drill press work. The Smithy also came with a 6” jointer and a bandsaw. I already have a WoodMaster 6” jointer and a Shopsmith & Total Shop bandsaw in the 11’ range and monster 18” Laguna. I need to start purging stuff.

-- When someone tells me that can't be done, I think they are challenging me.....

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Ted724

63 posts in 2165 days


#100 posted 04-30-2019 08:45 PM



Merrill77-
Shopsmith tool rests come in 2 flavors primarily. The model 500 and model 505/510/520. The 505/510/520 has a longer arm because of the wider table down-tubes are farther apart than on the M500s. Both have the same sized shaft for mounting into the carriages.

For the Fox I recently aquired it was missing a bunch of stuff so I cut off a quill from a junk one I had. (I repair Shopsmith tools so seem to always have an abundance of lots of extra stuff). The end is 5/8” with the tapered flat, but behind that it went to 3/4” rod. What I noticed is the 5/8 part does not spin concentric so I suspect the 3/4” part is not in same concentric plane as the 5/8”. It basically floats in the quill between the bearing and the spacer so I am looking for some good 5/8” shaft stuff to make some nice 5/8” shafts. Tedd724, where did you get your 5/8 material for the shafts you made?

I too have much Shopsmith stuff and just aquired a Fox SuperShop and last Friday picked up a Smithy SuperShop. The extra long lathe earlier in this post (Sammy Sosa lathe for coring baseball bats) I think I am going to sell cause I never use it for the length. It can turn just short of 7.5 feet in length. I am going to keep most of my Shopsmith stuff (mostly the minis I have set as saw & sanding stations) and replace with the SuperShops for lathe and drill press work. The Smithy also came with a 6” jointer and a bandsaw. I already have a WoodMaster 6” jointer and a Shopsmith & Total Shop bandsaw in the 11 range and monster 18” Laguna. I need to start purging stuff.

- DantheToolman


Dan, I got the drill rod from Enco, but they’re no longer in business. MSCdirect.com took over for them. Or you can get it from most metal suppliers or ebay. I believe it’s O-1 drill rod. It came a hair over 5/8” so it was necessary to “polish” the Shopsmith end with some emery cloth/sandpaper to get a perfect size for the Shopsmith stuff. Just spin it on the Supershop while applying the emery cloth. The other end fit easily into the R8 collet without polishing. It generally comes annealed, as mine did, so it’s easy to work, but some is hardened which should be mentioned in the description.

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