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Supershop owners

by Dan Krager
posted 07-21-2018 01:08 AM


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242 replies

242 replies so far

View Handtooler's profile

Handtooler

1628 posts in 2609 days


#1 posted 07-21-2018 01:38 AM

Certainly looks a lot like my ShopSmith MK 5 purchased in 1974 and still in operation today

-- Russell Pitner Hixson, TN 37343 [email protected]

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Dan Krager

4407 posts in 2711 days


#2 posted 07-21-2018 02:12 AM

Other than the functions the machine performs, the Fox Super Shop has very little in common with Shopsmith. Tony Fox was an engineer at Magna Engineering, the birthplace of the Shopsmith, and they came to a parting of ways over future designs. Tony designed the Super Shop to be heavy enough for metal work because he wanted both DIY markets, the woodworkers and the metal workers. The problematic Reeves pulleys used by Shopsmith were his pet peeve, so none of the Super Shops have them. Variable speed is achieved by constant torque electronic controls of a 110V/220V DC motor. It also has powered lateral feed which Shopsmith never considered. In 1975 I proposed a lateral feed idea to Shopsmith, sending them full size mechanical drawings of how they could do it economically, but they politely said “no thanks”. The Super Shop outweighs the Shopsmith by nearly 400 lbs. Having owned and used Super Shops and Shopsmith machines side by side, I can testify that they both have limitations, but both are worthy machines. The Shopsmith organization is strong enough to have survived some very trying times, to their credit. Shopsmith people and machines are welcome here too!
DanK

-- Dan Krager, Olney IL http://www.kragerwoodworking.weebly.com All my life I've wanted to be someone. I see now I should have been more specific.

View Handtooler's profile

Handtooler

1628 posts in 2609 days


#3 posted 07-21-2018 11:19 AM

Thanks Dan for your very detailed explanation in their differences. Excellent write up.

-- Russell Pitner Hixson, TN 37343 [email protected]

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ArtMann

1423 posts in 1293 days


#4 posted 07-21-2018 09:26 PM

Your interest group might be rather small. I have never heard of the machine and I have been woodworking since 1976.

View Redoak49's profile

Redoak49

4137 posts in 2465 days


#5 posted 07-21-2018 10:29 PM

I have a Shopsmith that I use for all kinds of sanding… flat sander, pneumatic drum sander, spindle sander and also as a lathe.

Not long ago, I used a Super shop and was very impressed. It is a very sturdy solid machine and with I had one.

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woodbutcherbynight

5974 posts in 2886 days


#6 posted 07-22-2018 01:30 AM

Interesting topic. I had no idea about the Super Shop. Have seen a Shopsmith at a guys shop but never used one myself.

-- Live to tell the stories, they sound better that way.

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Dan Krager

4407 posts in 2711 days


#7 posted 07-22-2018 01:58 AM

One of the setups I experimented with was power cutting dowels. Notice that I’m using a custom tail stock which holds a hollow shaft with R-8 collet taper and threaded like the head stock spindle. This makes tooling setups very convenient. There’s a much better method I think, and some day I’ll get around to experimenting with it. The three jaw chuck on the tail is stationary (don’t get excited about key left in chuck) and fitted with wooden jaws that hold the round section of the stick after the cutter. The little chuck on the headstock is a four jaw that grips the square stick. When in operation, the headstock is cranked toward the tailstock while the stick is spinning against the cutter. The round stock exits through the hollow tail stock tube, which also holds it from flopping like a fish out of water.

The middle and last picture are from the back side. The middle picture shows the stationary cutter in the lathe tool rest. This tool holder was an optional accessory available in the day.

DanK

-- Dan Krager, Olney IL http://www.kragerwoodworking.weebly.com All my life I've wanted to be someone. I see now I should have been more specific.

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CNC4FUN

1 post in 235 days


#8 posted 01-23-2019 05:14 PM

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Dan Krager

4407 posts in 2711 days


#9 posted 01-23-2019 08:34 PM

I was fascinated by this conversion effprt. I’m kinda curious though, If you replaced the lateral carriage motor with a stepping motor, would that not have served well? Too much back lash? Not that it matter, but I think that is what Tony’s original intent was.

Top RPM for main spindle is 7200 RPM.

DanK

-- Dan Krager, Olney IL http://www.kragerwoodworking.weebly.com All my life I've wanted to be someone. I see now I should have been more specific.

View JethrowClampett's profile

JethrowClampett

24 posts in 219 days


#10 posted 02-08-2019 11:38 PM

Hello Members, I signed into site to keep up to date with the Supershop. I have the Smithy Supershop 220v with all accessories (except the band saw). Purchased the year Smithy discontinued selling the machine, had a 50% off inventory clearance.

JethrowClampett

-- Jethrow

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Dan Krager

4407 posts in 2711 days


#11 posted 02-09-2019 05:29 PM

Good show, Jethrow. Some pictures would be nice. Do you use it a lot?

DanK

-- Dan Krager, Olney IL http://www.kragerwoodworking.weebly.com All my life I've wanted to be someone. I see now I should have been more specific.

View poopiekat's profile

poopiekat

4520 posts in 4211 days


#12 posted 02-09-2019 09:46 PM

Is this the same Smithy Corp that used to make miniature overhead mills and precision metal working lathes for small shops?

-- Einstein: "The intuitive mind is a sacred gift, and the rational mind is a faithful servant. We have created a society that honors the servant and has forgotten the gift." I'm Poopiekat!!

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Dan Krager

4407 posts in 2711 days


#13 posted 02-10-2019 03:14 PM

Yes, PPK. They still make mills and lathes and combo machines but not the Supershop. Their metal working stuff has a pretty good reputation and I’ve been tempted. Missed a GREAT deal at Christmas last year where they were selling deeply discounted.
DanK

-- Dan Krager, Olney IL http://www.kragerwoodworking.weebly.com All my life I've wanted to be someone. I see now I should have been more specific.

View JethrowClampett's profile

JethrowClampett

24 posts in 219 days


#14 posted 02-10-2019 08:34 PM


Good show, Jethrow. Some pictures would be nice. Do you use it a lot?

DanK

- Dan Krager


Dan, I use it lightly, with home renovation projects this spring I will be using it quite a bit for molding etc. I will upload pictures.

-- Jethrow

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JethrowClampett

24 posts in 219 days


#15 posted 02-10-2019 08:38 PM


Is this the same Smithy Corp that used to make miniature overhead mills and precision metal working lathes for small shops?

- poopiekat

Yes Same business out of Michigan (still in business), in fact they provided light milling options for the Super Shop. I passed on that, but with the R8 collet you can pick up those options on other websites. The machine seems to be identical to the Fox. I did purchase the 6 in. joiner option, the thing weighs 80 lbs. I have all of the wood turning options, but didn’t pick up the band saw. I would assume the Fox band saw would work, been on craigslist for that options, but owners were selling that as a package with the machine ( wouldn’t separate for purchase).

-- Jethrow

View Ripper70's profile

Ripper70

1309 posts in 1385 days


#16 posted 02-10-2019 08:44 PM

Here's one for sale in Frankfort, OH. Seems to be in pretty good condition.

-- "You know, I'm such a great driver, it's incomprehensible that they took my license away." --Vince Ricardo

View merrill77's profile

merrill77

211 posts in 2363 days


#17 posted 02-18-2019 08:18 PM

Hi Dan and others!

I picked up an old (and slightly rough-around-the-edges) SuperShop a few years ago. I already had a pretty full woodshop – I bought it solely to use as a drill press and lathe. I think it would be a fantastic drill press if it was in better condition. So I’ve been looking for another in better shape, ever since. Finally found one – will be picking it up next weekend, I hope. Looks like it has all the add-on tools as well (which I doubt I’ll ever use). I can post some pictures of both machines when I get it home, if there is interest.

Mine has the motorized carriage…I’m hoping to do a little light metalworking on it at some point, but haven’t yet. I need some metalworking cutters, first :)

-- Turning beautiful wood into scraps...one board at a time --Chris

View Gene Howe's profile

Gene Howe

11755 posts in 3905 days


#18 posted 02-18-2019 09:02 PM

Hi to my white squirrel buddy.
Since 1975 there has been at least one Shopsmith in my shop. It’s down to two, now. One outfitted with a Jointech and router table. As you might surmise, that one is pretty much limited to the saw and router functions. My other one is a shorty, with all her functions still intact. Well, more or less. I don’t do any turning. Other than the disc sanders, the only accessories are the BS and the 6X48 belt sander. My metal working tasks are handled by my son. I stick with wood.
But, were a Total Shop machine to become available anywhere near me, I’d sure consider owning it…or turn my boy on to it.

-- Gene 'The true soldier fights not because he hates what is in front of him, but because he loves what is behind him.' G. K. Chesterton

View DantheToolman's profile

DantheToolman

26 posts in 361 days


#19 posted 02-18-2019 09:23 PM

Merrill77- is the one you are picking up the same as just sold on eBay for around $360 in West Virginia? I considered but not ready to make a road trip yet. I repair Shopsmith tools for over 16 years now and used them in my shop for over 40. I have 5 main Shopsmith machines- 510/520 (I can change out the table rails); 2 minis- one bandsaw & jigsaw- saw station & one belt sander disc or strip sander- sanding station; one is short base as drill press- 2 tables- one for wood and other with machinest’s vise for metal; 2 machines connected together as a lathe originally used to core wooden baseball bats until Sosa got busted.
I just traded a repaired headstock for a Fox SuperShop. What a tank! The table height lock front brake broke but I was able to jury rig it and it fits back into slot but doesn’t brake. I am still working with adjustments and ideas to make it grab. But I am impressed with it overall. I especially like the lathe function and 32-7200 rpm.
I contacted Dan K and his goal starting this blog was to assist SuperShop owners. I am starting to collect as much information about them and the differences between the machines over the manufacturing years from Fox, to Ironwoo, to Smithy and whatever other companies made it similar branded machine. If you have some information about parts and sources, please send to me and I will start compiling it so we can all share it. If you have any Shopsmith questions, feel free to also bump me. Work email is [email protected]

-- When someone tells me that can't be done, I think they are challenging me.....

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merrill77

211 posts in 2363 days


#20 posted 02-18-2019 09:28 PM

Yup, that is the one. I think the same feature is broken on the one I’m going to pick up. Oddly, I don’t think I’ve ever really used that feature on the one I have. Hmm.

So far, I’ve only dealt with Smithy for repair parts, so I have nothing to offer there. Thanks for your offer to help!

-- Turning beautiful wood into scraps...one board at a time --Chris

View Dan Krager's profile

Dan Krager

4407 posts in 2711 days


#21 posted 02-18-2019 11:08 PM

I forgot to mention in private conversation with DTM that a pair of hose clamps on the table holding shafts will hold the table securely. There must have been a bad batch of brake shoes somewhere along the line. If you find them to be cast, replace them with turned steel ones like the originals.

DanK

-- Dan Krager, Olney IL http://www.kragerwoodworking.weebly.com All my life I've wanted to be someone. I see now I should have been more specific.

View DantheToolman's profile

DantheToolman

26 posts in 361 days


#22 posted 02-19-2019 01:16 PM


This is a picture of the double Shopsmith in the guy’s basement when I bought it in 2013.

-- When someone tells me that can't be done, I think they are challenging me.....

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Dan Krager

4407 posts in 2711 days


#23 posted 02-19-2019 04:28 PM

Yes, that’s a stretch version alright!

I have the capability of stretching a Supershop similarly. A second pair of way tubes has inserts that slip into the right end of the way tubes on a machine and terminate in the tailstock casting resting on another base. Extends the lathe to almost 9 feet and is very solid. I haven’t used it since digital cameras so I have no pictures of it set up. The interesting thing is that the power feed carriage works on the extended tubes without interruption because the spacing of the broached teeth on the underside of the ways’ ends is perfect match when fully butted together. Turned a set of 6×6” porch posts.

There is a danger that may not be obvious to someone trying to stretch a Supershop. The tailstock casting has an extremely heavy torsion spring in it that must be carefully locked down when the way tubes are to be removed. I made sure that both locks (that secure the machine vertically AND horizontally) were firmly engaged in a dimple I drilled for the purpose. Be very careful.

DanK

-- Dan Krager, Olney IL http://www.kragerwoodworking.weebly.com All my life I've wanted to be someone. I see now I should have been more specific.

View merrill77's profile

merrill77

211 posts in 2363 days


#24 posted 02-19-2019 06:39 PM

Dan – do you remember how you modified the tubes to connect them together? I don’t know that I’ll ever turn a 6’ post, but I’d think I may have the need to turn something a little longer than the stock limitations allow, such as a baseball bat or barstool leg.

-- Turning beautiful wood into scraps...one board at a time --Chris

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Dan Krager

4407 posts in 2711 days


#25 posted 02-20-2019 12:39 AM

M77, yes, I turned some steel rod to fit the ID of the way tubes. You should note that on Tony’s machines the ID of the front tube is different than the back tube. That is due, I think, to the broached teeth in the front one.
The connectors are only about 8” long and are secured with short set screws. A very tight slip fit is essential.

The standard lathe on my setup can reach 39” CTC. It would be a real pain to set up the stretch in my crowded shop now!

DanK

-- Dan Krager, Olney IL http://www.kragerwoodworking.weebly.com All my life I've wanted to be someone. I see now I should have been more specific.

View DantheToolman's profile

DantheToolman

26 posts in 361 days


#26 posted 02-21-2019 08:14 PM

Another possible way to attach machines is like the super-long Shopsmith was done. The guy I bought it from was a machinist and machined a piece between each set of bars with same out side diameter but each end has a lip to seat inside the bar bores. Then threaded rob with couplers in the center all the way to ends. he capped ends and rod came out a drilled hole and he capped it with a flat piece of metal and nut and lock washer. It works great. The bars are about 10’ long and very heavy so I can imagine multiply that times the weight of the bars for the Supershop!

-- When someone tells me that can't be done, I think they are challenging me.....

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Dan Krager

4407 posts in 2711 days


#27 posted 02-22-2019 12:23 PM

In the case of the Supershop bars, that method does not take into consideration the broached teeth under the front tube. The carriage won’t move onto the extension unless those teeth match up perfectly. I suppose one could remove the internal carriage gear and make it work. The bars are heavy enough that set screws onto the connector hold well and do not need a lengthy threaded rod to hold them together. The sockets in the end castings are not very deep and if there is a nut preventing it from bottoming out completely, there could be trouble with the big torsion force. Now, it’s possible to drill the socket in the center for space, I suppose, but I just haven’t experienced the need for an internal rod to hold it together.

I can see that method working well on the Shopsmith, though. The tension of the rods would make the bars a little stiffer.

DanK

-- Dan Krager, Olney IL http://www.kragerwoodworking.weebly.com All my life I've wanted to be someone. I see now I should have been more specific.

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merrill77

211 posts in 2363 days


#28 posted 02-25-2019 02:54 PM

I picked up my 2nd SuperShop yesterday. It is in fantastic shape :> Unlike my first, which was pulled from a barn by the PO, this one has been well cared for. It came with all the original accessories and manual, as well as the belt sander, bandsaw and jointer add-ons. I have a vague memory of these being the same as the ShopSmith accessories – is that true? I’m kinda skeptical on the jointer. I think it may weigh as much as the entire ShopSmith! Ok, maybe not that much…but it is a beast. Don’t want to move that thing around any more than needed. Here it is, in my crowded shop. You can see my first one in the background.

Things that I’ll need to fix/improve:
1) The table height lock lever is broken – actually the fitting that the lever screws into is split. I have the parts. Hopefully I can make a replacement. Or pull it off my first one.

2) No motorized carriage. My first one has this…it looks like all the castings are the same and the holes are there…so I think I’ll be able to move it over. I really like that feature, especially for vertical drill press.
3) Can’t get the belt sander to tension. The provided instructions say to turn one way until machine labors, then turn back and let the auto-tension take over. First part is good…but then the belt just goes slack. There is what appears to be a push-in button on the tension knob. What does that do?

4) Lift torsion is not set correctly. Lifting to vertical position is a bear.

I have a large bandsaw and had not planned to keep the bandsaw add-on, until the owner pointed out that it is variable speed…and therefore useable on metal, which my WWing bandsaw is obviously not. So maybe I’ll keep it.

-- Turning beautiful wood into scraps...one board at a time --Chris

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Hockey

172 posts in 889 days


#29 posted 02-25-2019 04:10 PM

What is the approximate selling price (not asking price) of these Super Shops. I know that Shopsmiths sell for way less than they are worth on the used market. Also, does anyone know if the sliding table with the drill vise slots will fit on a Shopsmith, particularly in reference to the way tubes dimensions?

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merrill77

211 posts in 2363 days


#30 posted 02-25-2019 06:00 PM

I think selling price is probably all over the map. There is both very low supply (because they didn’t make many) and very low demand (both because nobody has heard of them and because there is no longer much support from the manufacturer). I just bought this one for $360 on eBay. Asking prices are frequently over $1000. I think a few on eBay over the last few years have sold in that range…not sure.

No, the tubes are different sizes, so that won’t work.

-- Turning beautiful wood into scraps...one board at a time --Chris

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Hockey

172 posts in 889 days


#31 posted 02-25-2019 06:03 PM

Thank’s, merrill77.

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Dan Krager

4407 posts in 2711 days


#32 posted 02-26-2019 12:25 PM

I have no experience with the belt sander, so I’m no help with that issue. Yes, the carriage should move onto the newer machine but it may be stiff because machining tolerances were tight on that and if it’s off just a hair… and yes, I use the lateral feed all the time. Right now it’s being used to carry a router jig to duplicate balusters. May get a picture later today.

There is a procedure for adjusting the torsion spring. It’s done with the machine in the standing position to minimize tension. There are three allen head sockets screws to loosen and I think a large pipe wrench or strap wrench with a cheater is involved. I’ve only done it once to a machine decades ago, so I don’t remember. I’d have to look, but I think the owner’s manual describes the procedure. Oh, and the head should be moved to the extreme right before attempting to stand it up.

Fox’s jointers were heavy machines, true, because he started making them beefier than Shopsmiths. He made several 3 wheel band saws, but the end of his run came before they were marketed much. He did cast adapters that held Shopsmith equipment and it seems that later producers welded some together.

The height lock looks like a casting in the picture. Replace it with a piece of mild steel machined and threaded to fit and it will last forever.

Selling prices vary widely as merrill points out. I confirm what he said about tubes not fitting. We’re pretty much on our own for (our mutual) support.

DanK

-- Dan Krager, Olney IL http://www.kragerwoodworking.weebly.com All my life I've wanted to be someone. I see now I should have been more specific.

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merrill77

211 posts in 2363 days


#33 posted 02-26-2019 02:12 PM

I adjusted the torsion spring last night. There is a tool specifically for that…my 1st unit did not come with one so I had to make one. The tool is just a rod with 2 pins sticking out. Anyway, it appears that the PO had actually torqued it the wrong way…it was pushing the tubes down instead of pulling them up. Works much better now :)

-- Turning beautiful wood into scraps...one board at a time --Chris

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Hockey

172 posts in 889 days


#34 posted 02-26-2019 03:53 PM

Thank’s, Dan.

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Dan Krager

4407 posts in 2711 days


#35 posted 02-27-2019 11:26 PM

Here is a short video a Supershop equipped with a lathe duplicator jig. What you can’t see in this video is hidden under the white tin shield that protects the linear motion front to back. It’s simply a 1/2” x 2” piece of mild steel with slanted sides (like so <——> ) riding between pairs of V groove bearings secured to the T slots to hold the bar snugly. My right hand is applying slight pressure to keep the stylus against the template. The carriage is autofeeding at about 1/2 speed with the spindle turning at 300 rpm. The first and only pass stopped at the detail and I manually held the follower steady left to right to round the detail area cleanly, then finished the detail under power as seen.

Takes about 1 1/2 minutes to move about 24” along a 36” turning, maybe two minutes to complete this whole operation. I’ll have to touch up the turnings by hand to round the rest of the baluster the router could not reach in this setup, crisp the detail, and sand them. A set of 36 in red oak for a stairwell railing in my house. So the main benefit here is getting consistent size, shape, and placement of the detail.

DanK

-- Dan Krager, Olney IL http://www.kragerwoodworking.weebly.com All my life I've wanted to be someone. I see now I should have been more specific.

View Eric's profile

Eric

79 posts in 714 days


#36 posted 02-28-2019 12:18 AM



This is a picture of the double Shopsmith in the guy s basement when I bought it in 2013.

- DantheToolman


It’s the Sammy Sosa bat maker. It was advertised on the Rockford Craigslist as being the perfect set-up for coarking bats. Notice the bat in the picture…

-- Eric

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merrill77

211 posts in 2363 days


#37 posted 02-28-2019 12:54 AM

That is a nice setup, Dan! I assume you considered a spring so you don’t have to stand there…did you eventually do that?

-- Turning beautiful wood into scraps...one board at a time --Chris

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Dan Krager

4407 posts in 2711 days


#38 posted 02-28-2019 03:37 PM

No, I haven’t done that and yes I’ve considered it. But it’s no trouble to hold it…takes very little pressure and I can quickly take the router out of the cut if there’s trouble. A spring seems like it would get in the way as much as be helpful. It’s never going to be something I can walk away from, so this keeps me paying attention! :) I might consider a friction stop to hold the follower for cutting cylinders (like dowels) but there’s another type of setup I made for that purpose before the follower was made.

Notice that there is no center support on the 1” diameter spindle in this long cut, that’s how little pressure there is to the cutting action.

DanK

-- Dan Krager, Olney IL http://www.kragerwoodworking.weebly.com All my life I've wanted to be someone. I see now I should have been more specific.

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merrill77

211 posts in 2363 days


#39 posted 03-01-2019 03:59 PM

I was thinking that, along with the spring, you could add a cut-off switch based on ending carriage position and then you could walk away from it :) Overkill, I admit, for making just 30 spindles.

-- Turning beautiful wood into scraps...one board at a time --Chris

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Dan Krager

4407 posts in 2711 days


#40 posted 03-01-2019 10:32 PM

LOL Merrill, BTDT. Sometimes there’s a fine line between manual and CNC type automation. It was Tony’s dream however, long before CNC was common, to replace the plastic emblem panel with electronic controls that essentially turned this machine into an engine lathe and powerfeed mill, not really CNC but a good deal more automatic than it ever became. His biggest barrier I think was the prohibitive expense of stepping motors of the time. My philosophy is becoming more and more KISS!

DanK

-- Dan Krager, Olney IL http://www.kragerwoodworking.weebly.com All my life I've wanted to be someone. I see now I should have been more specific.

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merrill77

211 posts in 2363 days


#41 posted 03-03-2019 06:16 PM

Yesterday I took some time to thoroughly clean my new SS. Then I pulled the carriage motor and controls out of my old SS and transplanted them into the newer one. I think the old is a Fox and the new is a Smithy (at least, the manual that came with it said Smithy). The Fox has a serial# plate (01042), while the Smithy does not. Found some minor differences and took some pics along the way. I’m mostly posting these for documentation purposes, in case anyone is interested. But maybe I should be posting this info over on VintageMachinery.org? Anyway…

Here is the Fox motor:

...and the Smithy

I had hoped to transplant the broken part from the table lock lever on my old unit to the new one, but they are different. Old (Fox) on right, new (Smithy) on left”

Making my own replacement now seems daunting, since it needs a square hole. Which I could do in wood…but not in steel :(

Other than the condition, the interior of the carriage is mostly the same. Looks to use the same casting mold. But there were 2 key differences. First, the 3 holes for bolting the motor bracket into the carriage were different sizes – 7mm bolts for the Fox, 8mm for the Smithy. That required a trip to the store. Also, if the carriage came with a motor, it looks like the carriage position lock is omitted – that is the top-most horizontal rod, which sits at the back of the housing in the newer pic. At least, it was missing in the Fox. So now, without the motor as a brake, I don’t have a way to lock the carriage position…making usage in vertical mode problematic.

Info on the carriage motor:

-- Turning beautiful wood into scraps...one board at a time --Chris

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JethrowClampett

24 posts in 219 days


#42 posted 03-03-2019 07:14 PM

Merrill77 – congratulation on the bid, I was the other guy bidding against you on e-bay. Was only interested in the attachments, so I didn’t want to go beyond $350. One thing that’s odd, is the Power Station, the drive has a slice down the middle of the shaft.

I’m hooking up the jointer (its a beast) and I noticed that the fitting that goes over the power shaft (metal coupling), doesn’t screw on, rather floats on the threaded shaft and there is a break pin that slides though the slice down the power shaft for the power transfer.

Is yours the same ? I’m guessing this is for safety purposes or am I missing something ?

-- Jethrow

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Dan Krager

4407 posts in 2711 days


#43 posted 03-03-2019 08:14 PM

Merrill, sure you can make a square hole in metal and rather easily. BTDT many times. Drill a hole whose diameter is the same as the side of the square. Thine with a square file simple file out the corners. Doesn’t take as long as you would imagine.

I’ve never seen a motorized carriage without a lock shaft. All of mine have had it. At the end, quality control suffered.

While I think the lock shaft on the Fox Supershops carriage is threaded left and right, I don’t see why a right hand thread in a wedge block wouldn’t work. Haven’t tried it, though. Worse comes to worse, use a hose clamp on the tube. It’s remarkable what they will restrain.

Thanks for all the pictures!
DanK

-- Dan Krager, Olney IL http://www.kragerwoodworking.weebly.com All my life I've wanted to be someone. I see now I should have been more specific.

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merrill77

211 posts in 2363 days


#44 posted 03-04-2019 01:14 AM

Merrill77 – congratulation on the bid, I was the other guy bidding against you on e-bay. Was only interested in the attachments, so I didn t want to go beyond $350.

Ironic. I didn’t have much interest in the attachments :) Probably would have paid the same without them.

One thing that s odd, is the Power Station, the drive has a slice down the middle of the shaft.

I m hooking up the jointer (its a beast) and I noticed that the fitting that goes over the power shaft (metal coupling), doesn t screw on, rather floats on the threaded shaft and there is a break pin that slides though the slice down the power shaft for the power transfer.

Is yours the same ? I m guessing this is for safety purposes or am I missing something ?

I’m guessing that power take-off design is some sort of standard. But I’d say that, along with the nylon connector, this allows a connection where the two shafts are not perfectly aligned…or where one end or the other might move a little in use. Just guessing, though.

-- Turning beautiful wood into scraps...one board at a time --Chris

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merrill77

211 posts in 2363 days


#45 posted 03-04-2019 01:23 AM

Dan – good point. I guess that shouldn’t take too long in mild steel. I don’t have a good quality file for that…but that is a solvable problem.

Unfortunately, I’ve run in to a more immediate problem. For my 1st SS, I made a rotating mount for the main upright mount that allows me to turn the unit 90deg in vertical mode, so that the vertical drill press faces a more useful direction in my shop. After the successful carriage motor transplant, I though this part would be easy. And it was, until the very last hole I needed to drill in the base. Hit a weld line that I can’t get through (the details of the base construction are somewhat different between the two). My drill bits just skate right off it that weld. Considering my options now. Try to find a portable magnetic drill press to rent? Or remove the entire beast off the stand and take it to a machine shop? So close…and yet so far.

-- Turning beautiful wood into scraps...one board at a time --Chris

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JethrowClampett

24 posts in 219 days


#46 posted 03-04-2019 01:44 AM


Ironic. I didn t have much interest in the attachments :) Probably would have paid the same without them.
- merrill77

I will pm you.

-- Jethrow

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Dan Krager

4407 posts in 2711 days


#47 posted 03-04-2019 04:21 AM

Merrill, will a rotary grinder or carbide burr make the hole the right size? Dremel offers diamond burrs that are pretty aggressive. And of course, a plasma cutter…

DanK

-- Dan Krager, Olney IL http://www.kragerwoodworking.weebly.com All my life I've wanted to be someone. I see now I should have been more specific.

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merrill77

211 posts in 2363 days


#48 posted 03-04-2019 01:17 PM

Thanks – I had overlooked abrasive cutters. That will take a while, but maybe not as long as taking the base to a machine shop. I’ll start with some of the ceramic cutting disks I’ve used for steel in the past and see how far that gets me. I think I have some diamond cutters in my kit as well.

-- Turning beautiful wood into scraps...one board at a time --Chris

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merrill77

211 posts in 2363 days


#49 posted 03-06-2019 06:55 PM

I noted another difference between my two models – the thread size on the quill shaft. The older (Fox) has 1 15/16” diameter flat-top threads:

while the newer (Smithy) has 2 1/4” standard threads:

I don’t know what the dis/advantages of each are, or why the change.

-- Turning beautiful wood into scraps...one board at a time --Chris

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merrill77

211 posts in 2363 days


#50 posted 03-06-2019 07:25 PM

I’ve just completed moving my rotating base over to the new SuperShop. Here are some pics, in case future visitors are interested. First, moved the head and carriage to the “top” end, supported the underside of the carriage and detached the hinged mount from the base and the tubes. I was able to complete the work without taking the head, carriage or tubes off the machine…and the tubes were (mostly) not impeding the work.

Next, drill a new set of 6 holes in the base. The original holes are circled in blue (3 of the 4 will still be used) and the new holes are in red. Note that I hit a weld line on the lower-right hole and was forced to use an abrasive cutter…hence the ugly square hole :( Fortunately, invisible in use.

Next comes the lower half of the rotating mount. I used 1.5” BB plywood and matched the hole spacing to re-use the existing holes where possible. The head of the center bolt is epoxied in place on the underside – this is the bolt that the top half rotates around. The four bolt heads that you see here secure the bottom half to the SuperShop base. The top, empty, counter-sunk hole is extraneous and not needed. The lower, empty, counter-sunk hole is used, but did not need the counter-sink.

Then I put the hinged mount back on the tubes and attached the top half of the rotating mount using the existing mounting holes. After lowering it onto the bottom half, it looks like this:

In either of the rotated positions, there are 4 bolts holding it all in place – the center (which remains in place) and 3 that are removed during the rotation. I used wing nuts for quick change on those 3 – you can see two of them above (the third is to the right of the hinged mount). Here it is from the front:

After moving the carriage and head to the hinged end and raising to the vertical position, it can be easily rotated by removing the 3 bolts with wing nuts, rotating and then replacing the bolts. Here is the base when rotated:

Note that if you wanted to rotate the other direction, then the ugly square hole would need to move to the other side of the base.

Of course, after raising the hinged end 3”, the other side needs to be raised, as well:

And here it is in my shop. Since I mostly use the SuperShop as a drill press, I make use of the extra space for more tools :)

-- Turning beautiful wood into scraps...one board at a time --Chris

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