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View Mosquito's profile

Machinable Waterproof Epoxy

by Mosquito
posted 05-30-2018 03:14 AM


18 replies so far

View bobasaurus's profile

bobasaurus

3601 posts in 3638 days


#1 posted 05-30-2018 03:39 AM

You’ll want a flexible epoxy of some kind, as most are so brittle they would probably crack somehow when contacting a router bit. This is the first thing I found on google, no idea if it’s good or bad:

https://theepoxyexperts.com/shop/casting-resins/max-cast-24-oz-epoxy-resin-super-flexible-tough-high-elongation-clear-casting/

-- Allen, Colorado (Instagram @bobasaurus_woodworking)

View bobasaurus's profile

bobasaurus

3601 posts in 3638 days


#2 posted 05-30-2018 03:40 AM

Though if it’s effectively cured urethane, it might be so rubbery it won’t cut either. Might have to experiment some.

-- Allen, Colorado (Instagram @bobasaurus_woodworking)

View Mosquito's profile

Mosquito

9809 posts in 2746 days


#3 posted 05-30-2018 03:47 AM

I definitely plan to experiment some. It’s going to be some expensive experimentation lol It’s also possible that I could pour the epoxy around something else as well, to make the pocket, if I had to. Will have to figure that out as I try some things…

I’ll have some of this stuff left over from a current project, so I’ll probably start with that. It cures pretty hard, but says it should be machinable, so we’ll see…

-- Mos - Twin Cities, MN - http://www.youtube.com/MosquitoMods - http://www.TheModsquito.com

View MrUnix's profile (online now)

MrUnix

7449 posts in 2652 days


#4 posted 05-30-2018 03:52 AM

Epoxy machines nicely, and in its neat form, is waterproof – it is commonly used as a barrier coat in marine applications. However, thick pours are problematic due to the heat generated. It would probably be better (and cheaper), if possible, to machine the ‘pocket’ first, then coat it with epoxy.

Cheers,
Brad

-- Brad in FL - In Dog I trust... everything else is questionable

View Mosquito's profile

Mosquito

9809 posts in 2746 days


#5 posted 05-30-2018 04:02 AM

That is an idea Brad, thanks. The pocket was intended to be in the void to be filled with epoxy, but perhaps I could use something I can later remove or machine out to make the bulk of the pocket with out having to fill it all with epoxy first. Hadn’t thought of that.

The epoxy I’m using currently says to not pour more than 1/8” at a time, but through my experiments I’ve been able to pour up to about 1/4” fine, but that takes quite a while when it’s a few days between cures lol I know what you mean, though. First time I mixed a bit too much and left 3/4” in the bottom of the mixing cup, and yellowed while curing, presumably due to the excessive heat

-- Mos - Twin Cities, MN - http://www.youtube.com/MosquitoMods - http://www.TheModsquito.com

View Lazyman's profile

Lazyman

3736 posts in 1841 days


#6 posted 05-30-2018 04:55 AM

Maybe a resin specifically designed for pouring or casting would be a better option than epoxy on this case? How big is the void?

-- Nathan, TX -- Hire the lazy man. He may not do as much work but that's because he will find a better way.

View summerfi's profile

summerfi

4274 posts in 2141 days


#7 posted 05-30-2018 05:12 AM

If you coat a pocket-shaped object with wax, it will pull right out after the epoxy or resin has set. That’s assuming there are no flanges or other complicating shapes on it.

-- Bob, Missoula, MT -- Rocky Mountain Saw Works http://www.rmsaws.com/p/about-us.html -- ~Non multa sed multum~

View MikeB_UK's profile

MikeB_UK

151 posts in 1488 days


#8 posted 05-30-2018 08:31 AM



If you coat a pocket-shaped object with wax, it will pull right out after the epoxy or resin has set. That s assuming there are no flanges or other complicating shapes on it.

- summerfi

If it has any complicated shapes or flanges, cut the plug in pocket shape out of wax.
Pour the epoxy, push in the wax insert to the required depth (Inventive clamping may be required, may be easier to clamp first pour later).
When the epoxy is set you can just pull melt the wax plug out.

-- If I say I'll fix something around the house I will, there is no use nagging about it every 6 months.

View Dave Polaschek's profile

Dave Polaschek

4064 posts in 1036 days


#9 posted 05-30-2018 10:30 AM

The Max Clear Grade epoxy I have used for food grade stuff is machinable, as are most epoxies, but as others have said, it’ll be easier going if you don’t fill the void you want to cut out so that you minimize the machining needed. If you’d like to give it a try, I could bring it along when we get together for me to pick up the post drill from you.

-- Dave - Minneapolis

View John Smith's profile

John Smith

1924 posts in 616 days


#10 posted 05-30-2018 11:37 AM

CASTOLITE is just one of many companies that make casting and embedding resin
that is crystal clear for embedding things like artifacts, bugs, etc
and is easily machinable and stays clear forever. I have no idea how UV tolerant it is.
to broaden your education on this subject, google: “Casting and Embedding Resin”
http://www.castolite.com/

Castolite-AP Clear Casting Plastic
Castolite Formula AP is an Acrylic-Polyester resin; it is optically the clearest,
most light stable liquid plastic of this type.

Generates milder exothermic heat than other formulas
Excellent for embedding biological, mineral, or industrial components for display
Excellent for educational displays and visual teaching aids

.

-- I am a painter. That's what I do. I paint things --

View Mosquito's profile

Mosquito

9809 posts in 2746 days


#11 posted 05-30-2018 12:26 PM

Thanks so far everyone! Looks like I’ve got a few things to read up on, and think about. This is why I asked :-)

-- Mos - Twin Cities, MN - http://www.youtube.com/MosquitoMods - http://www.TheModsquito.com

View John Smith's profile

John Smith

1924 posts in 616 days


#12 posted 05-30-2018 01:05 PM

I became familiar with Castolite Embedding Resin back in the early ‘80s
helping my daughter with her Girl Scout Troop embed items they had collected
into paperweights as gifts to their parents. I made a silicone mold and used Castolite resin.
a simple small vacuum chamber helps to relieve any bubbles that may form in the resin.
excellent project for anyone that has young kids or grandkids.

-- I am a painter. That's what I do. I paint things --

View ToddJB's profile

ToddJB

8519 posts in 2584 days


#13 posted 05-30-2018 03:08 PM

Is this in wood? Does it need to be pretty in color? Ive done what you’re describing with jbweld, but on cast products

-- I came - I sawed - I over-built

View MrRon's profile

MrRon

5631 posts in 3697 days


#14 posted 05-30-2018 07:45 PM

Smooth-on has a whole family of resins used for making castings. Get their informative catalog. Go WWW.smooth-on.com

View Mosquito's profile

Mosquito

9809 posts in 2746 days


#15 posted 05-30-2018 08:10 PM

Thanks Ron, Smooth-On was one of the brands I was looking at previously.

Todd, it would be in wood, yes. I’d like for it to be clear, for the effect I’m after

-- Mos - Twin Cities, MN - http://www.youtube.com/MosquitoMods - http://www.TheModsquito.com

View Kelly's profile

Kelly

2397 posts in 3398 days


#16 posted 05-31-2018 03:23 PM

Just for reference, I buy my 2:1 epoxy in 1-1/2 gallon packages. I had enough of it to try my hand at casting small jewelry pieces for my wife to play with. For some of it, I laid pieces of wood in a silicone mold, the poured resin over it. When done, I had to sand, then buff to get a nice finish to both the wood and resin.

To sand, I took it down to 320. For polish, I took it to my buff station and used a fresh spiral wheel and swirl remover normally used for car paint.

The point is, if it can buff back to a high polish, it can be machined in other ways.

_
Warm your resin to around 75 degrees Fahrenheit for easier pour and fewer bubbles.

View John Smith's profile

John Smith

1924 posts in 616 days


#17 posted 05-31-2018 04:03 PM

Mos – you still haven’t said how big the cavity is that you want to fill with epoxy.
size of a pencil ?
size of a cow’s hind leg ?
big as a golf ball ? tennis ball ?
why does it have to be waterproof ? out in the weather, in a boat ? underwater spear gun ?
do you have photos or drawings made up yet of your Top Secret project ?

.

.

-- I am a painter. That's what I do. I paint things --

View SteveMI's profile

SteveMI

1137 posts in 3748 days


#18 posted 05-31-2018 05:14 PM

There was an article on “How to create dramatic inlays with epoxy” by By Christopher Moore in FWW 267 Mar/Apr 2018 Issue Lots of great info, I plan to get some of the epoxy he shows.

Article says “six-year stint at a company specializing in cast resin furniture, interior architectural surfaces, and decor” before starting out on his own. He recommends epoxy from Entropy (entropyresins.com). His website is https://noblegoods.com/collaborations/

Steve.

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