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View toolie's profile

planing endgrain cutting board glue ups

by toolie
posted 03-31-2018 01:16 PM


25 replies so far

View WyattCo's profile

WyattCo

93 posts in 1023 days


#1 posted 03-31-2018 01:32 PM

The glue won’t harm the blades. When planing end grain, take very light cuts.

View Rich's profile

Rich

6166 posts in 1508 days


#2 posted 03-31-2018 02:06 PM

I doubt if the previous poster has even tried it. I haven’t, never will, and here’s why:

https://www.thewoodwhisperer.com/articles/end-grain-through-the-planer/

-- Half of what we read or hear about finishing is right. We just don’t know which half! — Bob Flexner

View splintergroup's profile

splintergroup

4149 posts in 2141 days


#3 posted 03-31-2018 02:10 PM

I use 36 grit paper in my sander for those initial passes. It doesn’t clog as easily and really speeds up the initial flattening.

Typically I’ll use a handheld belt sander (60 grit) to knock down the squeeze out so it will sit level on the DS. Dried glue can be quite damaging to steel planer blades.

View John Smith's profile

John Smith

2780 posts in 1081 days


#4 posted 03-31-2018 02:11 PM

the common paint scraper does a great job of removing excess dried glue
prior to using any motorized finishing machine on it.

Rich – I have never even entertained the thought of running anything with endgrain
through a planer. I have never seen or heard of a project exploding in the planer.
when a person understands the structural issues of endgrain and cutting tools,
it is common sense not do it. sure, people “probably” do it all the time and get away with it.
then – there are others that suffer serious consequences with a damaged project and/or bodily harm.
great reference to the Wood Whisperer ! (this goes hand-in-hand with the riving knife/splitter issues).

.

.

-- there is no educational alternative to having a front row seat in the School of Hard Knocks. --

View Andre's profile

Andre

3843 posts in 2725 days


#5 posted 03-31-2018 02:33 PM

I use an old scrapper or a old Stanley 9 1/2 with a PMV-11 iron to knock off excess glue and only hand plane! Have run some end grain over the jointer but would never consider going through the planner!

-- Lifting one end of the plank.

View WyattCo's profile

WyattCo

93 posts in 1023 days


#6 posted 03-31-2018 03:42 PM



I doubt if the previous poster has even tried it. I haven t, never will, and here s why:

- Rich

I’m curious as to how you’ve come to this conclusion.

The very first endgrain cutting board I ever made, I ran through the planer. I didn’t know any better and this was about 15 years ago. Due to tear out issues, I posted on a discussion board I was on asking for advice on minimizing the tear out. Some of the members started warning me about running endgrain cutting boards through a planer. Some said they did it regularly but took very minute passes. Despite the warnings, I’ve always done it but I do understand the dangers. I just follow extended safety rules. I’m on my second set of planer blades in 6 years.

View sras's profile

sras

5660 posts in 4048 days


#7 posted 03-31-2018 04:03 PM

I have also used a planer to level end grain boards, but I have transitioned to using a router sled and thickness sander. While the planer worked, I feel better using the setup I have now. For me, “light passes” with the planer means .002” at a time.

-- Steve - Impatience is Expensive

View John Smith's profile

John Smith

2780 posts in 1081 days


#8 posted 03-31-2018 04:05 PM

fthis – like I stated: people “probably” do it all the time and get away with it.
then – there are others that suffer serious consequences with a damaged project and/or bodily harm.

so far – you are one of the fortunate ones that have been lucky….. hope your luck holds out.
just because you do it – does not make it any safer for others to try it.
IMHO, to give potentially dangerous information and guidance is just being totally irresponsible.
I am with Rich: Never tried it – Never will.

.

-- there is no educational alternative to having a front row seat in the School of Hard Knocks. --

View Rich's profile

Rich

6166 posts in 1508 days


#9 posted 03-31-2018 04:09 PM


fthis – like I stated: people “probably” do it all the time and get away with it.
then – there are others that suffer serious consequences with a damaged project and/or bodily harm.

- John Smith

There are people in the world who have never lost a round of Russian roulette too. All it takes is one.

-- Half of what we read or hear about finishing is right. We just don’t know which half! — Bob Flexner

View LesB's profile

LesB

2677 posts in 4362 days


#10 posted 03-31-2018 04:35 PM

I have to agree with John Smith on the potential for problems. I have never tried it. I use a belt sander with 60 grit then a drum sander starting with 80 grit to get the end grain flattened out. Finishing with an orbital hand sander.

That said it makes me wonder if the newer spiral cutter heads with multiple carbide inserts would work. Theoretically at any one point in time it is only making about a 1/2” cut. I have a 15” Powermatic with the continuous spiral blade which also is not taking a full width cut at any one instant and is in a slicing action which should be similar…..but I’m still not willing to risk damaging a set of $90 blades to try it on end grain cutting.

-- Les B, Oregon

View Woodmaster1's profile

Woodmaster1

1565 posts in 3506 days


#11 posted 03-31-2018 04:41 PM

Planing end grain usually ends in disaster. I use a drum sander with 80grit. I have access to one at my woodworking club as well as my own.

View diverlloyd's profile

diverlloyd

4029 posts in 2776 days


#12 posted 03-31-2018 07:54 PM

I’ve done a couple hundred end grain cutting boards through the planer never had a issue. But I always glue two boards to the sides and one on the back long grain ways. To stop the end grain from wanting to crack out not to mention that you can make the the long grain pieces taller and longer then cutting board to cut out snipe and for flattening the board. I hate sanding and rarely sand anything I prefer to hand plane finish.

View Kelly's profile

Kelly

3168 posts in 3863 days


#13 posted 03-31-2018 08:28 PM

A couple thoughts come to mind:

1) Go to the casino, the pay back on your gamble will be less threatening to you and your equipment; and,

2) If you have to work that hard to avoid a problem or disaster, why do it?

View toolie's profile

toolie

2193 posts in 3547 days


#14 posted 03-31-2018 08:49 PM

That’s a curious blend of opinions. I also thought it would not be a terribly good idea, except that the guy at MTMwood does it all the time. And he does nothing BUT end grain cutting boards.

https://"mtmwood.com/en/mtmwood.php

I like the idea of using a belt sander to knock down the really egregious squeeze out. i think ill give that a try with the next board and stick with the drum sander.

-- there's a solution to every problem.......you just have to be willing to find it.

View diverlloyd's profile

diverlloyd

4029 posts in 2776 days


#15 posted 03-31-2018 09:27 PM



A couple thoughts come to mind:

1) Go to the casino, the pay back on your gamble will be less threatening to you and your equipment; and,

2) If you have to work that hard to avoid a problem or disaster, why do it?

- Kelly


1) I worked at a casino and it’s actually really sad to see what it does to people. How much they lose because of being addicted to gambling. Family,friends,money,houses, cars and their mental and physical health. As for the machinery I haven’t had to change blades or anything on either of my planers due to putting end grain through them.

2) I don’t understand how it’s so much more work. You are already cutting pieces to height and doing a glue up so a extra 5 minutes max. How long does it take to sand by hand or level one with a router sled twenty to thirty minutes or more. Not including the time to set up the router and get the board in place. Saving a minimum of 20 minutes per board per side over just a hundred boards has saved me 66 2/3 hours making each board that much more profitable in the long run. About $3332 for 100 boards at charging $50 per man hour and not including being able to use that time to make more products and or boards to donate to charity( all of mine go to charity or as gifts minus about 20) and offset your taxes.

View Kazooman's profile

Kazooman

1540 posts in 2871 days


#16 posted 03-31-2018 09:29 PM

No planer for me. Blowing a board to pieces would not make my day. The loss of the material and work would be the least of my concern. Destroying my planer would top the list.

I used to just scrape and then belt sand. Then I bought a drum sander. Now I scrape a bit, sand with 80 and then 120 grit, being sure to occasionally clean the gunk off the drum with one of those big eraser sticks and then right to the ROS. Works great. There are definitely scratches in the board after the 120, but they are easily removed with the ROS. Send the board through the sander several times at different angles without changing the depth to minimize the scratches.

OH. If you use the big eraser, be sure to clean any bits and pieces off of the feed belt. They will stick to the board and will then burn on the drum if you flip the board over.

No hundreds here, I have only made about 25 board. I will be screwing the feet on the latest one later this evening. All for personal use or as gifts. No tax write-offs here.

View Kazooman's profile

Kazooman

1540 posts in 2871 days


#17 posted 03-31-2018 09:35 PM


I ve done a couple hundred end grain cutting boards through the planer never had a issue. But I always glue two boards to the sides and one on the back long grain ways. To stop the end grain from wanting to crack out not to mention that you can make the the long grain pieces taller and longer then cutting board to cut out snipe and for flattening the board. I hate sanding and rarely sand anything I prefer to hand plane finish.

- diverlloyd

I have often used the “extended side pieces” when I am planing something small or my available stock is such that I cannot afford any potential snipe issue. However, always gluing two outriggers to every board and another piece for the end sounds like a lot of extra work and a lot of wasted material. Your later post talks about saving time and money by using the planer. I think you might come out ahead with a drum sander.

View Kelly's profile

Kelly

3168 posts in 3863 days


#18 posted 03-31-2018 11:47 PM

Diver, maybe I should have made the point more clear: “If you have to work that hard to avoid a problem or disaster,——- and it may still go bad for you and/or your equipment———, why do it?

When I was young, I pressed the limit on mountain roads [but I only took 1/128th at a time] and never had an accident, but had to go back and pick up the driver of the car behind me a couple times. At some point, I figured out there was no money in it and, sooner or later. . . .

View BCWP's profile

BCWP

24 posts in 859 days


#19 posted 10-09-2018 07:10 PM



I doubt if the previous poster has even tried it. I haven t, never will, and here s why:

https://www.thewoodwhisperer.com/articles/end-grain-through-the-planer/

I drove a vary large end grain board across the workroom and into a drywall 8 feet away. There was some drywall repair to be done, and the board had to be reduced in length by about 4 inches.

Never again!
- Rich


-- “Today is only one day in all the days that will ever be. But what will happen in all the other days that ever come can depend on what you do today." Hemingway - "For Whom the Bell Tolls"

View diverlloyd's profile

diverlloyd

4029 posts in 2776 days


#20 posted 10-09-2018 11:12 PM

Since this thread resurrected
Kelly i have a over abundance of off cuts to use as side runners. And it is not that much extra work or working any harder.Compared to using the router sled it’s still faster and easier. My previous job was extremely dangerous and it paid off very well for me.
Has anyone put one through a planer and had it explode the planer causing damage? I’m looking for first hand experience not oh my buddy or I read on the internet but first hand accounts? Also how many of you guys who wouldn’t ever run one through run knotty boards through your planer? I did it once and had the knot fly out and to the back of the shop. I think they are more dangerous even more so for the people who stand in front of or behind the machine.

View Kelly's profile

Kelly

3168 posts in 3863 days


#21 posted 10-10-2018 02:42 AM

I’ve never had qualms about knotty boards through the jointer or planer. Even less so with the spirals. However, that it just a bit of figured wood, versus and entire plate of wood with figure.

The spiral jointer does a great job of cleaning a board with figure, but, as time goes by and the tips of the carbides wear, tear out grows. Miles down the road using the spiral blades and it’s still nothing the sander can’t detail out. Of course, as the blade wear increases, so does the difficulty of dealing with tear out.

P.S. Haven’t had a knot toss, YET.

View Rayne's profile

Rayne

1315 posts in 2458 days


#22 posted 10-10-2018 02:58 AM



Since this thread resurrected
Kelly i have a over abundance of off cuts to use as side runners. And it is not that much extra work or working any harder.Compared to using the router sled it s still faster and easier. My previous job was extremely dangerous and it paid off very well for me.
Has anyone put one through a planer and had it explode the planer causing damage? I m looking for first hand experience not oh my buddy or I read on the internet but first hand accounts? Also how many of you guys who wouldn t ever run one through run knotty boards through your planer? I did it once and had the knot fly out and to the back of the shop. I think they are more dangerous even more so for the people who stand in front of or behind the machine.

- diverlloyd

The link to the Wood Whisperer site shows pictures of a first-hand exploded cutting board with the hand injury. Others commented on the post that they’ve been injured or it broke their planer forcing them to buy another.
I would never run it through the planer based on common sense logic of end grain direction and high speed horizontal cutting. Not worth the risk. I got a drum sander just to avoid ever doing that (used one at that).

View bondogaposis's profile

bondogaposis

5897 posts in 3270 days


#23 posted 10-10-2018 02:52 PM

I don’t run end grain boards through the planer, it just doesn’t make sense to me. I’d hate to wreck a board or worse the planer.

-- Bondo Gaposis

View toolie's profile

toolie

2193 posts in 3547 days


#24 posted 10-23-2018 03:12 PM



I don t run end grain boards through the planer, it just doesn t make sense to me. I d hate to wreck a board or worse the planer.

- bondogaposis

And yet, the guy from MTM Wood does it all the time without incident.

-- there's a solution to every problem.......you just have to be willing to find it.

View Rich's profile

Rich

6166 posts in 1508 days


#25 posted 10-23-2018 03:20 PM

After my absolutely certain guarantee I’d never try it in my earlier post (#2), I wound up giving it a try on some mesquite rounds. Never say never I guess. There was no damage to the board or planer (DW735), but it did dull the knives within literally 30 passes or so. Now that I have a shelix head on there I do it all the time and it works perfectly. Since it’s cross grain cutting on a really hard wood I have to take really light passes, but it gets the job done and produces excellent results.

-- Half of what we read or hear about finishing is right. We just don’t know which half! — Bob Flexner

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