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All Replies on Please Help, Over sanded this plywood veneer

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View tsutaz's profile

Please Help, Over sanded this plywood veneer

by tsutaz
posted 03-23-2018 05:29 PM


17 replies so far

View Loren's profile

Loren

10477 posts in 4102 days


#1 posted 03-23-2018 05:37 PM

That’s a maddening thing about plywood
today.

If you want to try to make it work, you could
buy or make some decorative banding, route
a groove and miter it in.

Otherwise that’s burnt toast.

View Andybb's profile (online now)

Andybb

1954 posts in 1058 days


#2 posted 03-23-2018 05:59 PM

We’ve all been there. (or at least I have) Is the exact size of the piece critical?? One thing I might consider is to run it through the table saw, cut the walnut edging off, trim the plywood to eliminate the flaw then re-size and re-attach the edging. mIf the dimensions are critical that they remain the same then I’d go with Loren’s suggestion. I try to treat any type of veneer like it’s tissue paper.

Loren definitely knows what he’s talking about. I’d just worry about a flawless fit.

-- Andy - Seattle USA

View sras's profile

sras

5135 posts in 3584 days


#3 posted 03-23-2018 08:37 PM

You could try your repair idea. I would suggest a practice run on a piece of scrap (or two). I have managed to get repairs to look pretty good. Take your time and pay attention to matching the grain pattern. If you cut the patch with wavy edges (except along the walnut) it can help hide the evidence.

-- Steve - Impatience is Expensive

View Andybb's profile (online now)

Andybb

1954 posts in 1058 days


#4 posted 03-23-2018 09:03 PM

You could even try a light layer of glue then sprinkling dust from the plywood on top and GENTLY (400-600 grit) sanding it smooth, especially if you’re going to put a sealing finish on top of the whole thing. Use something long and flat to attach the sand paper to so that it is built up no higher than the original. Let it dry completely, mask it off and sprinkle some walnut dust on the walnut edge so they are flush and co-planer. Sand like it’s tissue paper. The area is small so I wouldn’t worry too much about the grain, just matching the color. Even Maple colored wood filler might work just as well.

I think the original problem is that the walnut was just slightly below the level of the ply.

-- Andy - Seattle USA

View Loren's profile

Loren

10477 posts in 4102 days


#5 posted 03-23-2018 09:08 PM

Andy’s idea is a new one on me. It might work.
PVA glue will mess with your finish though so
test first. Super-glue is transparent enough
to be used for spot filling lacquer finishes so it
might work if your finishing with something of
similar clarity, water-based poly for example.

Another idea is to either cut off or leave the edging
in place and make some strips out of walnut
rounded on top to fit in a routed groove around
the plywood. It would protrude, but not by much
and if you didn’t use too much glue squeeze out
won’t be a cleanup problem. For that matter you
could lay down a coat or two of finish before
cutting the groove.

View Andybb's profile (online now)

Andybb

1954 posts in 1058 days


#6 posted 03-23-2018 09:53 PM


Andy s idea is a new one on me. It might work.
PVA glue will mess with your finish though so
test first.
- Loren

Keep in mind I just kinda made that up on the fly without prior experience but it’s one of the things I might consider with my idle brain if it were my project. Like Loren said, the glue you use will affect the end result. If I did that I might use wax paper and clamp a block on top to compress the dust then sand smooth. Again. I’d just be trying to restore the color, not match the grain. Remember that your eye will be a lot more critical than anyone else’s who probably wouldn’t even notice it after you match the color.

-- Andy - Seattle USA

View shipwright's profile

shipwright

8346 posts in 3252 days


#7 posted 03-23-2018 10:44 PM

I’m with Loren. Your best bet is to add a banding as an accent. That will look good, .... value added.
If you try to use the same material and hide it it will look like a repair and look not so good. ... value depleted.

In the future when you want to bring a solid edge down flush with photo thickness plywood faces, use a card scraper, not a sander. Your control is way better.

-- Paul M ..............the early bird may get the worm but it’s the second mouse that gets the cheese! http://thecanadianschooloffrenchmarquetry.com/

View MrRon's profile

MrRon

5631 posts in 3698 days


#8 posted 03-27-2018 02:58 AM

This could be a very sensitive task, but if you have some leftover plywood, I would try to do an inlay. It would take the hands of a surgeon to pull it off.

View tsutaz's profile

tsutaz

37 posts in 1037 days


#9 posted 03-27-2018 10:14 AM

Thank you all for the replies and ideas, I still have a few months to get this corrected. Finishing the table base and some other accessory attachments while I ponder on thoughts from your replies. As of now I’m leaning towards a little surgery. Stay tuned and thanks again for all your suggestions.

-Scott

View Planeman40's profile

Planeman40

1430 posts in 3215 days


#10 posted 03-27-2018 03:14 PM

I have always said that the difference between a good craftsman and a bad craftsman is a good craftsman knows how to cover up his mistakes. We all make them.

I agree with Loren. Just change the design and route a shallow groove covering the problem area and insert some veneer banding. Yeah, a lot of work, but that is the cost of mistake making. Also, you have now learned about checking the thickness of the outside veneer of a piece of plywood when selecting. I have seen some that is paper thin, allowing for no aggressive sanding.

-- Always remember: It is a mathematical certainty that half the people in this country are below average in intelligence!

View shipwright's profile

shipwright

8346 posts in 3252 days


#11 posted 03-27-2018 10:52 PM

...... and if you do use a banding to cover the oops! bring it down flush with the plywood with a card scraper this time.
Your control level is much higher.

-- Paul M ..............the early bird may get the worm but it’s the second mouse that gets the cheese! http://thecanadianschooloffrenchmarquetry.com/

View AxkMan's profile

AxkMan

65 posts in 581 days


#12 posted 03-28-2018 01:41 AM

There are some good comments here. You could always make due with it and just accept the lesson as time critical memory. An option to consider is maybe change the color and apply some darker stain but this might not do much.

View Andybb's profile (online now)

Andybb

1954 posts in 1058 days


#13 posted 03-29-2018 11:43 PM

Please post some pics and a description of what your final outcome is.

-- Andy - Seattle USA

View sricks's profile

sricks

19 posts in 4117 days


#14 posted 03-29-2018 11:53 PM

If you have a few months, why not make that piece over? There are some great ideas here on how fix it, but ultimately anything you do will require more sanding and the veneer is already too thin. Save yourself some time and frustration, learn from this one and make another. I know, easier said than done.

-- Check out my progress at http://projectartistry.com

View Nubsnstubs's profile

Nubsnstubs

1593 posts in 2184 days


#15 posted 03-30-2018 12:02 AM

There are several people here in Tucson that specialize in repairing those types of mistakes with nothing but a colored pen, pencil, or even an artist brush with some dyes. Paint in a grain line, or even a knot type feature, making sure the dye used is compatible with your final finish. After it’s done, you’d never know there was a problem before staining.

I waited for someone to mention this, but most here want you to cut, route or other sorts of things that can only cost you more time and money. The true craftsman is good at hiding mistakes or prominently displaying them under the guise of a feature. ............... Jerry (in Tucson)

-- Jerry (in Tucson) www.woodturnerstools.com

View tsutaz's profile

tsutaz

37 posts in 1037 days


#16 posted 04-06-2018 02:24 PM

Haven’t forgot about you guys and your suggestions. I’ve elected to completely redo 1 of these pieces and just going to let the others ride. After I’ve applied a coat of Arm R Seal on them, the areas doesn’t really show up to be that bad, and I get the wife approval too. Stay tuned for completed pictures. I’ll not have a chance to redo until after April 16th.

-tsutaz

View tsutaz's profile

tsutaz

37 posts in 1037 days


#17 posted 04-27-2018 03:38 PM

Thanks again for all the suggestions, but as 1 poster suggested, I just completely redid the bad piece and and chalked the mistake to experience, and the I did things much better the second time around too. However, if I do this next time, I’ll most likely use real wood instead of plywood, again, lessons learned there too. Anyway, here’s the final product, I’ll posted some more pictures a little later over in my project section.

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