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Making "flat" lacquer

by HammerSmith
posted 03-13-2018 04:00 AM


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83 replies

83 replies so far

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Rich

5851 posts in 1434 days


#1 posted 03-13-2018 04:53 AM

Rather than use some old junk with an uncertain sheen, why not go with a premium flat lacquer?

Note: The image says satin on the can, but it is flat lacquer. They’re a great company to do business with and I’ve bought it so I know.

-- Half of what we read or hear about finishing is right. We just don’t know which half! — Bob Flexner

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HammerSmith

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#2 posted 03-13-2018 05:27 AM



Rather than use some old junk with an uncertain sheen, why not go with a premium flat lacquer?

Note: The image says satin on the can, but it is flat lacquer. They re a great company to do business with and I ve bought it so I know.

- Rich

Thanks Rich. I’m not familiar with that brand, but I see your point about just buying some new lacquer..

But at the same time, lacquer never goes bad. Shoots, it doesn’t even have to be stirred… So I wouldn’t call it “junk”.

The can that I have, maybe I shouldn’t have disparaged it… I’ve been saving it for just such an occasion as this.. It’s thick on the bottom with the flattening agent, but I’m just not sure how much additives I can get away with…

If I could find “flat bronze” in a rattle-can, I would just use that… The base doesn’t really matter… But “flat” spray paint has limited color choices.

-- ~Jim

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Rich

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#3 posted 03-13-2018 05:38 AM

I had no intention of disparaging your can. That’d be like insulting your wife. Something I’d never do.

I don’t have any experience with vintage lacquer, so I’ll bow out on that discussion. Just do some test boards to see what kind of result you’re going to get with it. If it looks good, then go for it.

-- Half of what we read or hear about finishing is right. We just don’t know which half! — Bob Flexner

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HammerSmith

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#4 posted 03-13-2018 07:15 AM

Lol Rich, Im not insulted at all man… it’s just an old can of lacquer ;-)

I’m pretty sure that my plan will work out, and of course I will do some test pieces, but I never tried to make extra flat lacquer before, so I’m wondering how much “flat” I can add to it…

If I can get it to look like a bronze suede, that would be perfect…

-- ~Jim

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Rich

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#5 posted 03-13-2018 01:51 PM

Hopefully that works for you. If it doesn’t, you have a number of options. Water based dyes can be diluted to get just the tint you’re looking for. If you want a solvent based spray, Mohawk makes dye based transparent toners in a spray can that comes in about 30 colors. You could top either of those off with their dead flat pre-cat lacquer in aerosol as well. I think you’re looking at about a 5 to 10 sheen on that. I’ve used it and it is definitely flat.

If you want product links for any of that, let me know.

-- Half of what we read or hear about finishing is right. We just don’t know which half! — Bob Flexner

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CharlesNeil

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#6 posted 03-13-2018 07:58 PM

Absolutely. You just need to get the ratio of falttener rignt
Pm me and i will help
Done it many times.

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Rich

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#7 posted 03-13-2018 08:23 PM

Why PM? Why not let the rest of the community benefit from your wisdom and expertise?

-- Half of what we read or hear about finishing is right. We just don’t know which half! — Bob Flexner

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CharlesNeil

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#8 posted 03-13-2018 08:43 PM

The man ask a simple question
After 51years of finishing. I know the answer..
He dont need a bunch of argument or bs.

Just the facts.

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Rich

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#9 posted 03-13-2018 09:03 PM

Who’s arguing? With you involved I expect nothing but valuable input. No one’s going to argue with that.

But hey, have it your way. I just thought other folks could benefit from it too.

-- Half of what we read or hear about finishing is right. We just don’t know which half! — Bob Flexner

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000

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#10 posted 03-13-2018 09:06 PM

I was curious myself. I thought the stuff that settled was full of the solids, not just the flattening agent.
Was hoping to find out?

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CharlesNeil

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#11 posted 03-13-2018 09:47 PM

No jbay.the settlement is the flattner.
Go on any woodworking store..grab a can of rattlel lacquer..shake it.if its a semi glosd satin or flat..you will have a rattle. If is a gloss.nothing.
The ball is there to mix the flattner..
Check a spray can of shellac…nada..nothing. its always gloss.
There are several flatteners used
Most are fumed silica. A sand derivative. It diffuses the light and makes threm appear
what ever sheen desired..
The key is the amount of flattner used.
They actually sell it separately. It can be used on most finishes and used to diffuse shellac. As well.

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Rich

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#12 posted 03-13-2018 10:24 PM

Indeed, there were other curious members out there.

Now, not to start an argument, but just to state a fact, Mohawk pre-cat gloss lacquer in an aerosol can (M102-0410) does have a ball that rattles. I was surprised myself, but dang if it doesn’t rattle when I shake it. The only explanation I can think of is that it’s cheaper for them to just use one container for all of their aerosols.

-- Half of what we read or hear about finishing is right. We just don’t know which half! — Bob Flexner

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CharlesNeil

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#13 posted 03-14-2018 12:02 AM

All finishes begin as a gloss.
Love mohawk products.
Rich may be right. Beats me.

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HammerSmith

429 posts in 929 days


#14 posted 03-14-2018 12:09 AM



Indeed, there were other curious members out there.

Now, not to start an argument, but just to state a fact, Mohawk pre-cat gloss lacquer in an aerosol can (M102-0410) does have a ball that rattles. I was surprised myself, but dang if it doesn t rattle when I shake it. The only explanation I can think of is that it s cheaper for them to just use one container for all of their aerosols.

- Rich

I’m not real familiar with “pre catalyzed” lacquer Rich, but that’s different stuff..

I like the old nitrocellulose lacquer just because I’m familiar with it. The can that I have out there now is just a quart of Minwax semi-gloss, but it’s almost empty. ...It has the extra flattening agent on the bottom because I used it a couple times as high gloss (which means I didn’t stir it at all)..

Mostly, I’m just wondering if there’s a limit to how much additives lacquer can carry. Between the flattening agent and the tint, I’ll be adding a lot. If I can, I’ll tint it as heavily as paint…. less coats that way..

-- ~Jim

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HammerSmith

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#15 posted 03-14-2018 12:16 AM

Thanks CharlesNeil,
I was mostly just wondering if anyone has any stories about adding too much to the lacquer… I don’t mind a little trial and error, but I always like to try to avoid the error part as much as possible :)

For instance, could too much additives cause it to crack or peel after a couple months?

I’ll be spraying it with a gun.. iirc, the tip is 1, or 1.2 … I think I can get a bigger tip for it if I have to.

Cheers,

Jim

-- ~Jim

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Rich

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#16 posted 03-14-2018 12:29 AM


All finishes begin as a gloss.
Love mohawk products.
Rich may be right. Beats me.

- CharlesNeil

Either I’m right, or I’m losing my mind and hearing rattles that don’t exist :) Like I said, it seemed strange to me when I got the stuff and there was a ball in there since I’ve never known of a can of gloss anything that rattled. Again, it’s probably cheaper in the long run for them to use one type of can in their manufacturing instead of having to keep extra inventory of rattle-free cans. A ball in a can of gloss doesn’t hurt anything.

Then there’s the risk of a mixup on the line. Wouldn’t it suck to get a can of flat aerosol that didn’t have a ball? I’d be shaking like crazy and wondering if anything was getting mixed. That probably would rattle my brain.

Ah, crap. Now I have Jerry Lee Lewis stuck in my head.

-- Half of what we read or hear about finishing is right. We just don’t know which half! — Bob Flexner

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Rich

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#17 posted 03-14-2018 12:46 AM


I m not real familiar with “pre catalyzed” lacquer Rich, but that s different stuff..

I like the old nitrocellulose lacquer just because I m familiar with it.

- HammerSmith

I find the pre-cat sprays pretty much the same. The difference is that the final surface is harder and more durable. Since you have the NC around you may as well give it a go.

Regarding how much is too much flattener, etc, Charles is the guy to answer that one. I’ve never added flattener to a finish and wouldn’t have a clue how to know what quantities to use. Although I have gotten a surprise gloss finish from a can of satin when I didn’t stir it well enough :)

-- Half of what we read or hear about finishing is right. We just don’t know which half! — Bob Flexner

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CharlesNeil

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#18 posted 03-14-2018 12:47 AM

Ill expand on this more tomorrow. Sitting with a bag of ice pn rt shoulder. Hard type on phone

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000

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#19 posted 03-14-2018 12:48 AM

The joke I play on youngsters when they come in to my shop, and need to spray paint something. I tell them to shake the can until the ball stops rattling.
Usually takes them a while to figure it out, fun to see how long they will go..

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HammerSmith

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#20 posted 03-14-2018 12:53 AM



Ill expand on this more tomorrow. Sitting with a bag of ice pn rt shoulder. Hard type on phone

- CharlesNeil

Shoots, I hope you feel better tomorrow Charles!

...there’s no rush. It’ll be at least a few more days before I try this.

Cheers

Jim

-- ~Jim

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HammerSmith

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#21 posted 03-14-2018 12:56 AM

Lol jbay! Now that I think about it, I do remember shaking a can that didn’t have a ball inside…

I shook that damn thing for a loooong time! Finally I figured it out… :/

-- ~Jim

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000

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#22 posted 03-14-2018 12:59 AM


I m not real familiar with “pre catalyzed” lacquer Rich, but that s different stuff..

I like the old nitrocellulose lacquer just because I m familiar with it.

- HammerSmith

I find the pre-cat sprays pretty much the same. The difference is that the final surface is harder and more durable. Since you have the NC around you may as well give it a go.

- Rich

Also it takes less coats, and gives a better finish than regular nitrocellulose lacquer.
Only drawback is shelf life, but I use it before any ever goes bad. (Most say 4 months shelf life.)

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Rich

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#23 posted 03-14-2018 01:22 AM


Also it takes less coats, and gives a better finish than regular nitrocellulose lacquer.
Only drawback is shelf life, but I use it before any ever goes bad. (Most say 4 months shelf life.)

- jbay

That’s why you use sanding sealer…lol Seriously though, is that shelf life true for aerosol too? I’ve got a load of cans of Mohawk and there’s nothing about expiration dates on there. I go through it pretty fast. Just about anything the size of a breadbox or smaller I prefer to spray with cans versus getting out the gun and having to clean it.

-- Half of what we read or hear about finishing is right. We just don’t know which half! — Bob Flexner

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Rich

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#24 posted 03-14-2018 01:26 AM


Ill expand on this more tomorrow. Sitting with a bag of ice pn rt shoulder. Hard type on phone

- CharlesNeil

You’ve got my picture taped to the punching bag again don’t you? I knew you were going to sprain something eventually.

-- Half of what we read or hear about finishing is right. We just don’t know which half! — Bob Flexner

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HammerSmith

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#25 posted 03-14-2018 01:34 AM

...

That s why you use sanding sealer…lol Seriously though, is that shelf life true for aerosol too? I ve got a load of cans of Mohawk and there s nothing about expiration dates on there. I go through it pretty fast. Just about anything the size of a breadbox or smaller I prefer to spray with cans versus getting out the gun and having to clean it.

- Rich

Same here Rich… if I could find the right color in a rattle can, that’s what I would use too. It will only take two or three cans, tops.

But I never saw this color in a rattle can, especially not “flat like suede”, so that’s why I figure I have to mix my own.

About the expiration date for a rattle can, I always figured it’s good unless the tip gets clogged. I’ve even procured functioning tips from other old cans a few times, and the paint was always fine.. as long as it sprays..

-- ~Jim

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Rich

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#26 posted 03-14-2018 01:45 AM

I mentioned the Mohawk spray toners in an earlier post. Maybe you missed it. You can find them here and see if any of the colors suit you. They aren’t dead flat, but you can put dead flat over them.

Also, regarding clogged spray heads, you’re in luck. Yours truly did a blog post about how I use cans of compressed air to clear them. You can see down in the comments how excited jbay was that he can finally keep his cans of sanding sealer clean.

-- Half of what we read or hear about finishing is right. We just don’t know which half! — Bob Flexner

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HammerSmith

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#27 posted 03-14-2018 01:53 AM

I m not real familiar with “pre catalyzed” lacquer Rich, but that s different stuff..

I like the old nitrocellulose lacquer just because I m familiar with it.

- HammerSmith

I find the pre-cat sprays pretty much the same. The difference is that the final surface is harder and more durable. Since you have the NC around you may as well give it a go.

- Rich

Also it takes less coats, and gives a better finish than regular nitrocellulose lacquer.
Only drawback is shelf life, but I use it before any ever goes bad. (Most say 4 months shelf life.)

- jbay

I used to work for a guy who used water based pre-cat Lacquer… I always figured the “pre-cat” was because it’s water based… I do remember him saying that it takes less coats too..

I guess the water base is a nice feature, but I don’t use lacquer all the time, and I do have a proper mask, so the fumes don’t bother me too much.

When I made my bass, I learned a lot about nitrocellulose lacquer… I learned it the hard way, but it was a good lesson. My favorite thing about it, is how it becomes one thick coat in the end… It’s not “layers”, like with other finishes. That’s why it’s easier to buff out.

Imo, the unlimited shelf life is just an added bonus. You can open a can that’s been at the back of the shelf for years, and it’s perfect. Ready to go.. The fumes inside keep it from getting a skin on top, and I really wonder if it even needs to be stirred at all. I always do stir it (even gloss), but that’s just as a matter of course.

When I used the semi-gloss without stirring, I poured the Lacquer off the top and then stirred that part outside of the can. It worked fine..

Cheers

Jim

-- ~Jim

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000

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#28 posted 03-14-2018 01:57 AM



I mentioned the Mohawk spray toners in an earlier post. Maybe you missed it. You can find them here and see if any of the colors suit you. They aren t dead flat, but you can put dead flat over them.

Also, regarding clogged spray heads, you re in luck. Yours truly did a blog post about how I use cans of compressed air to clear them. You can see down in the comments how excited jbay was that he can finally keep his cans of sanding sealer clean.

- Rich


LOL

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000

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#29 posted 03-14-2018 02:02 AM


I used to work for a guy who used water based pre-cat Lacquer… I always figured the “pre-cat” was because it s water based… I do remember him saying that it takes less coats too..

Cheers

Jim

- HammerSmith


No, pre cat we’re talking about is solvent based. It just means that it has catalyst added to it before you buy it. Usually you buy it and they add it right before they bring it to you.

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HammerSmith

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#30 posted 03-14-2018 02:03 AM



I mentioned the Mohawk spray toners in an earlier post. Maybe you missed it. You can find them here and see if any of the colors suit you. They aren t dead flat, but you can put dead flat over them.

Also, regarding clogged spray heads, you re in luck. Yours truly did a blog post about how I use cans of compressed air to clear them. You can see down in the comments how excited jbay was that he can finally keep his cans of sanding sealer clean.

- Rich

Thanks for the links Rich, but it’s kinda hard to get paint shipped out here… It has to go by boat, takes weeks, and the shipping is rarely free.

We do have a local Woodcraft store, so maybe I’ll stop in there and see what kind of options they have. But they’re pretty expensive sometimes..

Cheers

Jim

-- ~Jim

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Rich

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#31 posted 03-14-2018 02:15 AM

Thanks for the links Rich, but it s kinda hard to get paint shipped out here… It has to go by boat, takes weeks, and the shipping is rarely free.

We do have a local Woodcraft store, so maybe I ll stop in there and see what kind of options they have. But they re pretty expensive sometimes..

- HammerSmith

Got it. I didn’t see your location until you mentioned it.

-- Half of what we read or hear about finishing is right. We just don’t know which half! — Bob Flexner

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HammerSmith

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#32 posted 03-14-2018 02:18 AM


I used to work for a guy who used water based pre-cat Lacquer… I always figured the “pre-cat” was because it s water based… I do remember him saying that it takes less coats too..

Cheers

Jim

- HammerSmith

No, pre cat we re talking about is solvent based. It just means that it has catalyst added to it before you buy it. Usually you buy it and they add it right before they bring it to you.

- jbay

Roger that jbay, I heard of that kind too… But I don’t go through it fast enough to justify it..

This project might use a whole quart to get three or four coats, so maybe I’ll look into it more. ...But I really do like the old school lacquer… I guess it’s just a comfort zone thing for me, because it’s so easily repairable…

From what I understand, a coat of pre-cat lacquer won’t melt into the previous coat, like nitrocellulose will… right?

*That feature isn’t very important on this project since it’s not gonna be polished, so maybe I’ll look into it more.

Cheers,

Jim

-- ~Jim

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CharlesNeil

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#33 posted 03-14-2018 12:03 PM

to the orginial ops question .. its hard to say if thats too much flattener or not with out knowing volumes.
Basically a satin is about double a semi gloss and a flat is about 3x a semi gloss,
be sure to spray a test to be sure your getting what you want .. sneak up ont he flattening agent, by testing you can always add more
Any time I tint a finish i like to put a untinted topcoat over that , seems to be more durable

Pre-cat lacquers are basically regular old lacquer with a mild catalyst added to speed cure and they do seem to offer more durability in that the finish is harder .
There are different catalyst , Typically they are mix at the factory, but some do add the catalyst when purchased , Sherwin Williams high build is an example. As stated the added at purchase type the typical shelf like is about 3 to 4 months, depending on brand , but i have had them go longer with no issue .
The factory mixed products, i have had set for months and months , just like the regular lacquer with no issue .
Do not mix a regular lacquer with a precat .. there is a slight difference in additive chemistry .

There is no such thing as a water base lacquer .. its impossible .. Manufactures
NAME” it lacquer so old solvent users will identify with it . Water base finishes are basically mixtures of Acrylic, alkyd and urethane’s . Noted exception to the oil modified urethane’s , like General Finishes Endurovar and Minwax “oil modified urethane” .. bot which for all intent and purpose’s are oil finishes at the core.

The Pre- cat waterbase products are exactly the same situation .. the catalyst is added to speed cure ( crosslinking) ..

Post catalysted products are different, these use “hotter” catalyst and quickly chemically cure the finish , same for both water and solvent based products .
Most of these use an acid based catalyst and can be pretty nasty to handle, meaning you need pretty much full haz-mat apparel and serious air supplied respirators and NEVER use it in your home .. lots of ventilation , it can burn your eyes and cause respiratory infections quickly .
They make for a great,. hard durable and fast out the door finish .. Many you can do 3 coats in a day and ship with in 12 to 24 hours, with out printing or tape damage,.

BTW.. I never use a sanding sealer , out side of the vinyl sealers , they re simply finish with sterates added to make them easier to sand and thus making them a softer finish, ‘
If you do use sanding sealers, make sure they are compatible with pre-cat and especially post cat products, general rule of thumb is if you use a sealer under a catalyzed finish it should be catalyzed as well.

There ya go, more than you wanted to know ..LOL

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000

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#34 posted 03-14-2018 05:59 PM

It is of My Opinion that the settlement is more than just a flattening agent. Lacquers, pre-cat lacquers are all made with several ingredients, flattening agents being just one of them. You can’t tell me that the flattening agent is the only ingredient that settles to the bottom. (you can tell me, but I don’t believe it)

Without any of the settlement mixed in, I think you are compromising the system. Will it work? Probably
Would you use it on a high end job, not me.

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CharlesNeil

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#35 posted 03-14-2018 06:30 PM

Then explain to me.why when you either mix or buy shellac or in this case gloss lacquer there is no residue in the bottom and why there is no rattle ball in anything solvent based that’s gloss..

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000

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#36 posted 03-14-2018 06:39 PM



Then explain to me.why when you either mix or buy shellac or in this case gloss lacquer there is no residue in the bottom and why there is no rattle ball in anything solvent based that s gloss..

- CharlesNeil

Not going to argue with you about it. Just my opinion.
If you think all the other ingredients stay mixed, that’s OK with me.

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CharlesNeil

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#37 posted 03-14-2018 07:03 PM

Then explain to me.why when you either mix or buy shellac or in this case gloss lacquer there is no residue in the bottom and why there is no rattle ball in anything solvent based that’s gloss..

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CharlesNeil

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#38 posted 03-14-2018 07:07 PM

Everything thst goes into lacquer or any solvent based product including shellac is dissolved.and will remain so.
Thats why you cant make a water based lacquer.the resins cant be dissolved by water.
Shellac is different.its dissolved in alcohol..
Alcohol and water get along well.

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CharlesNeil

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#39 posted 03-14-2018 07:14 PM

Finishes have placticers..elacticers .all sorts of additives.
The solid content on solvent products reflects the amount of actual resin used
Waterbase is an entirely different animal..and to work the solids have to higher..thus more expensive.
Having spent many hours and days in lab’s helping develop finishes..this is how it works.
Just saying

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HammerSmith

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#40 posted 03-14-2018 07:52 PM

Thanks for all the responses you guys… I wasn’t trying to start an argument, but some of this IS pretty funny :)

Regarding the residue at the bottom of a can of nitrocellulose lacquer, I’m absolutely sure that it’s just the flattening agent.

For pre-cat lacquer, all bets are off. I never bought any pre-cat myself, so I don’t know about that.

I just went out and looked on my shelf. There are three old quart-cans of “Minwax Brushing Lacquer”, all semi-gloss…

-One can has leftovers from a red tinted toner that I mixed about two years ago. There’s about an inch or so left in the bottom of that can. It still looks translucent-red, and there’s no skin on top. I can’t see the bottom of that one, but I’m sure it would get “thicker” if I stir it up.

-The second can has only a little bit left, and it’s clear all the way to the bottom of the can. No skin on top and zero residue on the bottom. It looks perfectly clear and homogenous.. I guess this is a re-used can where I poured the lacquer off the top of a semi-gloss to separate it from the flattening agent.

-The third can is about 3/4 full. This one looks perfectly clear and homogenous too, but it has plenty of the flattening agent resting at the bottom. If I stir that one up, I’m sure I wouldn’t be able to see the bottom.

I can’t even remember exactly how long it’s been since I opened any of these cans, but it must be about a year at least. The red toner is more like two years, if not more. I’m pretty sure that Nitrocellulose never goes bad, ever.

My main concern is, if I add too much additives, will that cause it to crack or peel later?

Thank again, cheers,

Jim

-- ~Jim

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HammerSmith

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#41 posted 03-14-2018 08:01 PM

~Basically a satin is about double a semi gloss and a flat is about 3x a semi gloss,
be sure to spray a test to be sure your getting what you want .. sneak up ont he flattening agent, by testing you can always add more
Any time I tint a finish i like to put a untinted topcoat over that , seems to be more durable

...

- CharlesNeil
~

Thanks Charles, that’s a good starting point reference :)

I’ll post pics and details when I try this. It’s a hanging thing that won’t need to be super durable since it will rarely be touched…

-- ~Jim

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Rich

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#42 posted 03-14-2018 08:04 PM

Hmmm. Now I’m wondering if that rattle ball in the Mohawk pre-cat gloss can is there for a reason. Could it have something to do with the fact that it’s catalyzed? Could there be settling going on in there? Inquiring minds want to know.

I’m tempted to de-pressurize the can and drain it into a mason jar so I can see what’s happening. I hate gloss anyway, and you all know I’m just crazy enough to do it.

-- Half of what we read or hear about finishing is right. We just don’t know which half! — Bob Flexner

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HammerSmith

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#43 posted 03-14-2018 08:06 PM

Lol Rich! Make sure you roll the video when you’re de-pressurizing that can! :)

-- ~Jim

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CharlesNeil

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#44 posted 03-14-2018 08:10 PM

Go for it.you will find nothing
Lest i repeat myself..anyyhing in a solvent finish is dissolved..except the flattner.
Its like the metallic flakes in a automotive finish
It diffuses light.iy has to be a solid.
Thats why alot of lower sheen oils streak so bad.
Oil is thin and when applied thin the flatteners dont have room to flow out.
Later

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Rich

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#45 posted 03-14-2018 08:13 PM


Lol Rich! Make sure you roll the video when you re de-pressurizing that can! :)

- HammerSmith

You mean I should’t use an ice pick? Nah, I figure if I invert it and let all of the gas out it should be safe to open (wearing goggles). Famous last words maybe, but the engineer in me needs to know.

-- Half of what we read or hear about finishing is right. We just don’t know which half! — Bob Flexner

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CharlesNeil

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#46 posted 03-14-2018 08:15 PM

Go for it.you will find nothing
Lest i repeat myself..anyyhing in a solvent finish is dissolved..except the flattner.
Its like the metallic flakes in a automotive finish
It diffuses light.iy has to be a solid.
Thats why alot of lower sheen oils streak so bad.
Oil is thin and when applied thin the flatteners dont have room to flow out.
Later

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CharlesNeil

2501 posts in 4715 days


#47 posted 03-14-2018 08:16 PM

I agree..rich is an expert on videos..
Im gone

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HammerSmith

429 posts in 929 days


#48 posted 03-14-2018 11:14 PM


Lol Rich! Make sure you roll the video when you re de-pressurizing that can! :)

- HammerSmith

You mean I should t use an ice pick? Nah, I figure if I invert it and let all of the gas out it should be safe to open (wearing goggles). Famous last words maybe, but the engineer in me needs to know.

- Rich

heheheheh, what about a pellet from across the yard? Might be more fun that way!

But really, if it’s “pre-cat” then I think you’ll find some separation inside. Maybe not be at first, because of the pressure in the can, but, if you let it sit for a while, my guess is it’ll start to get a skin on top eventually.

It would be an interesting experiment. Post it if you try it :)

Cheers,

Jim

-- ~Jim

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Rich

5851 posts in 1434 days


#49 posted 03-14-2018 11:32 PM


Go for it.you will find nothing

- CharlesNeil

Well Charles, I’m an engineer (retired). We do research and experiments to analyze things like this. I can’t see through a metal can, and I’m curious why there would be balls in a can of gloss lacquer.

Some people just assume they know everything. Like when someone says you can apply a coat of 1 lb cut shellac followed by a coat of 2 lb and then come back later and dye it with water based dye. I could have just said that’s dumb and left it at that, but instead, I tried it, since perhaps I was wrong. That’s what engineers do. And guess what? I was right, it was dumb.

As to why I get so irritated sometimes, it’s because people come here to learn, and when someone claiming to have 35 years of experience and claiming to be a teacher tells a novice woodworker something that won’t work, it’s about the worst thing they can do, since that person has no background to allow them to say hey, that doesn’t sound right. They’ll follow the advice blindly and when it doesn’t work, probably assume they did something wrong. Well, technically they did do something wrong, they listened to someone giving bad advice.

BTW, I’m not talking about you, your advice is stellar.

-- Half of what we read or hear about finishing is right. We just don’t know which half! — Bob Flexner

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Rich

5851 posts in 1434 days


#50 posted 03-14-2018 11:34 PM


I agree..rich is an expert on videos..
Im gone

- CharlesNeil

Still not over it I see…lol. Such petulance.

-- Half of what we read or hear about finishing is right. We just don’t know which half! — Bob Flexner

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