LumberJocks

All Replies on Shopsmith Owners

  • Advertise with us
View MrWizard's profile

Shopsmith Owners

by MrWizard
posted 09-27-2010 09:07 PM


31 replies so far

View Gene Howe's profile

Gene Howe

11871 posts in 3969 days


#1 posted 09-27-2010 10:08 PM

Well, Wiz, I’ve used a Shopsmith MK V for over 30 years.
It’s remodeled 3 houses, built my shop, built numerous kitchens of cabinets and now, just builds boxes and gun cabinets.
If you haven’t done so already, you might take a gander at this forum, too.
Shopsmith Forum

-- Gene 'The true soldier fights not because he hates what is in front of him, but because he loves what is behind him.' G. K. Chesterton

View rkh2's profile

rkh2

12 posts in 3389 days


#2 posted 09-28-2010 01:22 AM

Welcome Wiz. I also am a Shopsmith user. I have a MK V 520 with the bandsaw, beltsander, jointer and use the universal tool rest for my turning and it is my primary tool. I have a small shop so it serves my needs quite well. I also have a DeWalt 735 planner and a DeWalt 12” double compound miter saw and a compliment of corded, battery and hand tools. I have had the Shopsmith for some 17 years or so and love it. What part of the world do you make sawdust in?

-- Ron from Lewisburg, TN

View DaveDelo's profile

DaveDelo

86 posts in 3435 days


#3 posted 09-28-2010 02:41 AM

Wiz,

I bought a 1955 greenie Shopsmith in good condition 2 years ago to have a cheap solution for a table saw because I had a flooring project. After discovering this was not a great way to bust up sheet goods, I decided to outfit my humble basement shop with dedicated single machines and have been able to accomplish the task for about the same money as would have been needed to buy all the other Shopsmith add-on’s & accessories or buy a new Shopsmith. The Shopsmith has been relegated to drill press status and does a great job for what I need it for. Maybe if I get into turning I’ll use it for that to learn on. Not dissing the Shopsmith at all, I’ve just found alternatives that work better for me.

View richgreer's profile

richgreer

4541 posts in 3615 days


#4 posted 09-28-2010 03:48 AM

I’m a former Shopsmith user who has evolved to using other machines. I still use the shopsmith for some miscellaneous tasks. In particular, I like the belt sander option and I use the band saw for more delicate work (with a Carter stabilizer).

Shopsmith provides you with a reasonably good lathe and a very good drill press and horizontal boring machine. I think it’s greatest weakness is as a table saw and, IMO, a good tablesaw is essential to a shop.

There is a place for Shopsmith, especially for shops with limited space. At one time I used it with all it’s accessories except the planer with my independent miter saw, router and planer for all my work.

-- Rich, Cedar Rapids, IA - I'm a woodworker. I don't create beauty, I reveal it.

View dusty2's profile

dusty2

323 posts in 3970 days


#5 posted 09-28-2010 09:48 PM

I too am a Shopsmith user and have been for over twenty years.

I originally bought mine so that I could have a shop in the limited spaces available in military housing facilities. Then, later, I moved into my own home and still only had the size of a two car garage. I could now expand but find absolutely no reason to do so. My Shopsmith does absolutely everything that I need.

-- Making Sawdust Safely

View Dan's profile

Dan

3653 posts in 3421 days


#6 posted 09-28-2010 10:54 PM

My dad has a Shopsmith Mark 7 I think. I grew up watching him use it and hes always praised it. Shopsmith used to have a store here in Grand Rapids, MI. He also got the power station and dust collector from SS.

ShopSmith is a great tool, especially for people who have smaller shops and don’t want all the different machines taking up space. The biggest problem with Shopsmith is once you get one you will never have to buy another. This hurts the company in the sense that the shopsmiths from 20 or 30 years ago are still running today. Why buy a brand new SS when there are lots of used ones on the market that still run great. Each attachment runs on the same motor so you never have to worry about the smaller tools burning out. If you do burn out your headstock on an old unit the newer headstock’s will fit the older models. So you have no need to replace the whole thing.

They are so well built and due to fact that most all the parts and add ons work with all the models there is no need to ever have to buy another one… I guess thats why some tool companies make tools designed to break after a few years… They want you to buy a new one to keep them in business…

-- Dan - "Collector of Hand Planes"

View MrWizard's profile

MrWizard

145 posts in 3345 days


#7 posted 09-28-2010 11:32 PM

Thanks everyone for the reply’s. There are needs for every shop and being that mine is stil mostly a garage, space is limit. But Its also organization and we all have challenges with that I’m sure on some level. I’d love to have a huge work table in the middle of the floor that I can spread out and do run offs onto but not today. Maybe on my next property a huge barn would do it, Ive seen some sweet wood shops in barns over the years it just seems to be the place to connect with the wood. Half barn, half curing area, sorry im drooling now have to go clean up

View shipwright's profile

shipwright

8399 posts in 3339 days


#8 posted 09-29-2010 02:23 AM

Hi Gene, Dusty and rkh2. I’m new here but these guys know me from the SS forum. I have a dream 30’ x 40’ dedicated workshop in Canada equipped with everything from a shaper to a 25” dual drum sander and of course all the normal stuff but when we bought our winter place in AZ. I had only a semi enclosed carport and woodworking withdrawals. The answer for me was a used Mark V 510 that I quickly supplemented with the bandsaw, belt sander, jointer and planer. I didn’t stop there. I picked up and restored a 1950 10ER back home in Canada and if anyone doubts the precision available with SS I would point them to the miters and grain matches on my Oops! project, posted here. The critical (one chance is all you get) miters were all done on the 10ER. So was the lathe duplication work on the legs. Shopsmith, to me at least, represents the most quality woodworking equipment you can fit in a small space. Don’t expect production speed, but the quality and precision are as good as the man operating it.

Paul

-- Paul M ..............the early bird may get the worm but it’s the second mouse that gets the cheese! http://thecanadianschooloffrenchmarquetry.com/

View Gene Howe's profile

Gene Howe

11871 posts in 3969 days


#9 posted 09-29-2010 05:02 PM

Hi Paul. Good to see you here.

-- Gene 'The true soldier fights not because he hates what is in front of him, but because he loves what is behind him.' G. K. Chesterton

View MrToolHunter's profile

MrToolHunter

82 posts in 4215 days


#10 posted 09-29-2010 11:06 PM

I’ve had my Mark V 510 since October 1987 and love it. I wax the exposed metal parts and oil the speed adjuster every so often and it’s never had a maintenance issue. I’ve got a lot of tools, including a Delta 14” bandsaw, a Powermatic mortiser, a Delta Jointer, a PM66, a DeWalt 13” planer, etc. but the center of my shop is home for my Mark V. I used to be surprised that even with some fine individual tools that I prefer using the SS tools, but I’m over that now. Unless it’s an issue of capacity (and it rarely is) I would much rather do my work on my Shopsmith. The SS Bandsaw is killer, and I actually hate to have to use one of my other BS’s!

I was a beta tester of the new PowerPro electronic variable speed headstock, and I can’t wait to convert my MKV. Most people who are waiting for the new SSPP are looking forward to high-speed capabilities; but for me the low end and the additional HP is much more desired. Drilling with large Forstner bits, turning large diameters driving the bandsaw through 6” resawing, drilling metal and plastic, etc.

I’m also in the process of talking my bro-in-law to pass his Mark VII over to me since he doesn’t use it. I think it will go nicely in my shop with my SawSmiths.

-- http://www.MrToolHunter.com and http://www.Youtube.com/MrToolHunter

View SST's profile

SST

790 posts in 4736 days


#11 posted 11-29-2010 12:44 AM

I’ve got more Smiths than I know what to do with: 2 10er’s, a MK5 and a MK5 “shortie” that are active in my shop, and at least 3 more in storage waiting to re restored. I grew up with them, I love them, and I use them on all my woodworking. They are accurate and well built. The change over time only seems to be an issue for people who don’t own one.

-- Accuracy is not in your power tool, it's in you

View Paul Lajoie's profile

Paul Lajoie

137 posts in 3645 days


#12 posted 11-29-2010 01:52 AM

Hi Wiz, I also started woodworking on my mark5 over 20yrs ago, mostly cause of space and $. I’ve added single purpose tools as $ and skill level warrented. I still use it mostly as a table saw now and to power the bandsaw and jointer, but come spring time I plan on getting a sawstop tablesaw. I’ll keep the mark5 till I can afford to get a standalone bandsaw and jointer. I also picked up 10er that is at least 60yrs old, I cleand it up and it does all my drillpress work, no plans on getting rid of that. Just take the time to set up the SS as accurate as you can and remember a tool is only as accurate and safe as its operator.

Paul

View 8iowa's profile

8iowa

1591 posts in 4302 days


#13 posted 11-29-2010 01:53 AM

I started with a Shopsmith 500 in 1/2 of my garage back in 1983. Since then this machine has been upgraded, first to 510, then to 520, and now to the ultimate, the Power Pro. It’s to Shopsmith’s credit that they have always made it possible to upgrade an older machine, and there are a lot of 1950’s vintage Shopsmiths still “hummin” along with their third generation owners.

Shopsmith deserves to be congratulated for engineering, testing, and introducing the new DVR motor headstock in the face of a downturned economy and a market flooded with Asian tools. Ingeniously, they have made it possible for us to install this new power plant and controller into the old headstock. With a speed range of 40 to 1, and torque sensing ability, the DVR headstock can rip 3” oak at 4000 rpm, turn large diameter panel router bits at 10,000 rpm, and then drill with 3” forstner bits at 250 rpm. I’m packing a lot of capability into my 192 sq. ft. here in Gainesville.

-- "Heaven is North of the Bridge"

View MrWizard's profile

MrWizard

145 posts in 3345 days


#14 posted 11-29-2010 03:08 AM

Wow,
It is really great to hear back from so many of you that use the Shopsmith unit(s). Because the main purpose was for me to get back into turning wood, any comments on what chucks to use or other third party turning tools. I really look forward to making some nice bowls for the family and even sell a couple if I get it right.
Best of the holidays to all and to all, “Ill be in the shop.”

View 8iowa's profile

8iowa

1591 posts in 4302 days


#15 posted 11-29-2010 03:22 AM

My son-in-law is much more into bowl turning than I am, He has a Stronghold chuck with the “jumbo” jaws. I have the Super Nova 2 and get good use out of it.

Actually, Shopsmith has several nice turning chisel sets in addition to the five standard chisels. The 4 piece bowl turning set (518733) will get you going at modest cost.

-- "Heaven is North of the Bridge"

View rkh2's profile

rkh2

12 posts in 3389 days


#16 posted 11-29-2010 03:45 AM

I have the talon chuck made by Oneway with an adaptor for the Shopsmith and also a set of jumbo jaws and have good results with them. I also have the 4 piece bowl turning set from Shopsmith and a bowl turning set from Sorby and there is not much difference between them. Both are made of HSS steel. I also have the universal tool rest system from Shopsmith which weighs 35 pounds and makes it so much eaiser to turn and gives added weight to make the Shopsmith more stable . I use it whenever I do any turning, from pens, lidded boxes, ornaments, captive ring items and especially bowls. It is item (555868), I also have the speed reducer for turning larger bowls and it is also good if I need to do any drilling with larger size forstner bits. They were well worth the investment. They occasionally are on sale at Shopsmith. Hope this will give you some of the information you were looking for.

-- Ron from Lewisburg, TN

View lou's profile

lou

343 posts in 3983 days


#17 posted 11-29-2010 04:26 AM

Hi MrWizard.I have a 510 i bought new in 85 and used it for years untill I went to individual tools.I still use some of the functions on it such as the disc sander ,horizontal boreing, the lathe and the tilting table come in real handy for certain things.You can do things on it that you cant do on other machines,so thats why i will keep it till the end.If you go to the ss web site, there is a lot of usefull info for you there .Enjoy. P.S.,I see Mr Gene Howe and Shopsmithtom are on board so any questions could be answeared by those two gentlemen.

View MrWizard's profile

MrWizard

145 posts in 3345 days


#18 posted 12-28-2010 10:57 PM

OK,
First off Happy Holidays to all of you Lumber Jocks out there. Santa Brought me some wonderful Pen blanks, even some Antler Blanks. ( From the deer that didn’t make the team this year!). Anyway, I was looking for info on a pen mandrel that will work for the Shop Smith, That don’t seem to show one in there store. But I have found one at Craft supply USA. Any preference No. 1 MT Adjustable Pen Mandrel or No. 2 MT Adjustable Pen Mandrel ? Trying to learn all I can to fill my need to turn wood, even attempting to do some craving when I can.

So Happy New Year to all, and Best wishes for 2011
And for rkh2, I’m currently in Central California.

View rkh2's profile

rkh2

12 posts in 3389 days


#19 posted 12-28-2010 11:45 PM

Mr Wizard, I have a pen mandrel that is designed for the Shopsmith and I use it for my pen turning. Here is a link for it.

http://www.pennstateind.com/store/PKM-CL.html

-- Ron from Lewisburg, TN

View MrWizard's profile

MrWizard

145 posts in 3345 days


#20 posted 12-29-2010 02:43 AM

Hey Thanks, The wife and I have spent a relaxing day learning about all the ways to make pens and pencils. The last thing I wanted to do was have to buy another machine for the shop that I don’t have room for, but luckily the Shop Smith will be able to do it all for me once again. There is some very nice stuff out there. I did visit Penn State IND (bookmarked for future use) and they have some great deals, but I was also able to find some close out deals at this web site. http://augumspenworks.com/.
Anyone who is interested in turning pens or the like should have a look see before all the goodies are gone.
Mainly had to find resources for the pen guts and workings. Very excited and can’t wait to start turning some pens and Pencils. For under $2.00 dollars I can create some beautiful writing devices and make back my money very easily.

Happy Holidays

View Robinson's profile

Robinson

52 posts in 3233 days


#21 posted 01-15-2011 10:29 PM

I have a few minutes so I thought I would ramble on a little here about Shopsmiths. What I am saying the guys from the Shopsmith forum have already heard but they are used to me rambling. :-)
The great Shopsmith debate churns on and will keep doing so but I just ignore the nay-sayers and do my own thing. You see, I know something that many don’t. I know that the Shopsmith is one of the most useful, flexible, versatile machines on the planet. Forget the 5 to 7 basic functions for now even though they are reason enough to have at least one SS.
There are hundreds of possible uses for a Shopsmith. It is an excellent unit to drive all manner of things at a wide range of speeds. My SS bandsaw is better than any I have ever owned. The 6” belt sander is great. The jointer while only 4” is first class. The jig saw is super tough. The list goes on but that is only the stuff that SS built. The SS is great as a buffer or grinder (with a guard) or any one of a whole herd of things that require or can benefit from having a good variable speed drive. For 20 years in addition to farming and several other enterprises I owned and operated a boot and shoe repair shop. When times got too busy I ended up going back to the store at night to catch up. I had enough extra stuff at home to do a little work at home but I did not have an extra shoe finishing machine. It is a very expensive machine (a new one today is over $40,000, and even old used one can be pricey as well as heavy and huge. I didn’t own a metal lathe back then so I had a local machinist make me a batch of shaft adapters for the various sanding, trimming, burnishing, buffing and brushing wheels that would fit the arbor of my (new at the time) Shopsmith. I would transport a big box of shoes home with me from our store and work on them at night using the SS. Of course not everybody has that type of need but I am just trying to point out the flexibility available if you can think outside of the box a little.
Several years ago I got a little serious about planning my “retirement” woodshop. I looked long and hard at what was available and what I already had. I had bought my first Shopsmith (a 510) new in 1988 (for around $2300 which included a number of accessory items) after 28 years of wishing for one. I bought my second one used at a farm auction for $200. It had a jointer which I didn’t need and a set of manuals I already had so I sold the jointer and manuals on Ebay for a fair amount more than what I paid for the SS. A friend in Ohio had a little headstock problem and decided to upgrade to the new one with more HP and kindly gave me his old one. I found its minor problem and decided to get some Ebay parts to make “something” out of it. At that point a monster was born… I had began to realize just how versatile those things were. I then decided to base my whole woodshop around Shopsmiths. Many buy them because of space restrictions but I have a large shop. Many say that they buy one (or won’t) in spite of the effort needed to make the setup change-overs. I on the other hand embrace the change-overs and see them not as a restriction but as extreme flexibility.
I started buying used Shopsmiths (by plan) like a dog killing rats. :-) Over the next year or so I bought over two dozen of them. At the moment I have 10 in my shop in one form or the other. I have recently decided that 10 may be too many now that I have built the double drill press out of 2 and am reducing them to 7 at least for now.
I did buy a Ridgid TS-3650 table saw which I love and I already had a 6” long bed jointer and an RAS. I also have had for some time a 5 HP Foley/Belsaw Planer/molder/rip-saw/sander. I also have a stand-alone scroll-saw and a Ridgid Oscillating belt/spindle sander. I still have a couple of other older table saws that may stay or go. I do have a good number of hand held power tools and hand tools but pretty much everything else is Shopsmith based. I am hoping to find the time to do some light production work and being able to keep some operations sat up will be important to me.
I have a small Woodmizer bandsaw mill and about 20 acres of woods.
With the woodshop, the horse boarding operation, my genealogy research and my antique tractors I should have enough to keep me off of the streets… Oh, yeah. I’m hoping to add a 4 post lift to the mechanics/metal shop very soon. I kind of like to keep busy.
:-)

-- Francis Robinson, Central Indiana, USA - - Shopsmith fanatic

View MrWizard's profile

MrWizard

145 posts in 3345 days


#22 posted 01-17-2011 09:46 PM

WOW, Thats Impressive! But I like that you found ways to use the SS for your business needs and it kept you from falling behind at the store. The idea may be far off but I hope to have a barn size shop one day, maybe at my cabin retreat. Keep going strong

View Dan Krager's profile

Dan Krager

4435 posts in 2775 days


#23 posted 11-24-2013 04:03 PM

You can add my name to the list of Shopsmith fans. I don’t currently own one, but I am a SuperShop owner and would not want to be without my multipurpose tool. It has gotten me out of the “I said yes I can. Now, how am I going to do that?” jam many times. I have an interesting array of accessories for it. I hope to be able to afford a second one before too long.
DanK

-- Dan Krager, Olney IL http://www.kragerwoodworking.weebly.com All my life I've wanted to be someone. I see now I should have been more specific.

View sras's profile

sras

5244 posts in 3670 days


#24 posted 12-20-2014 04:43 PM

Rather than start a new forum topic, I thought I would add on to this one. While “wandering around” on the internet, I found some cool items online for Shopsmith fans:

T-shirt

Mug

Another Tshirt

Another Mug

A little late for a gift, but pretty fun anyway…

-- Steve - Impatience is Expensive

View Dan Krager's profile

Dan Krager

4435 posts in 2775 days


#25 posted 12-20-2014 05:09 PM

Like!
ShopSmith helped me earn a living a long time ago…

DanK

-- Dan Krager, Olney IL http://www.kragerwoodworking.weebly.com All my life I've wanted to be someone. I see now I should have been more specific.

View Gene Howe's profile

Gene Howe

11871 posts in 3969 days


#26 posted 12-21-2014 05:45 PM

Same here, Dan. Lot’s kitchens came off that SS. A few house remodels and one house and shop.
I’ve got an early MKV and a shorty MKV.
When Jointech was still in business I bought their saw train and router table to fit on the SS. That made change overs a real bear. Hence the shorty.

-- Gene 'The true soldier fights not because he hates what is in front of him, but because he loves what is behind him.' G. K. Chesterton

View Lee Barker's profile

Lee Barker

2172 posts in 3391 days


#27 posted 09-09-2019 01:33 PM

I recall my 10ER’s tubes were removable. Now, working with a Mark V (Greenie), it looks like the ends are permanently mounted to the pipes. Am I wrong? I need some education here….and thanks.

-- "...in his brain, which is as dry as the remainder biscuit after a voyage, he hath strange places cramm'd with observation, the which he vents in mangled forms." --Shakespeare, "As You Like It"

View Dan Krager's profile

Dan Krager

4435 posts in 2775 days


#28 posted 09-09-2019 02:20 PM

I’ve only owned one Shopsmith and it was used in 1975, and it was the predecessor to the current Mark V. (The intervening Mark VII was discontinued). The tubes were removable on that machine. I don’t own one any more and perhaps they’ve changed on the new series.

Check on the underside of the castings holding the tubes for set screws.

DanK

-- Dan Krager, Olney IL http://www.kragerwoodworking.weebly.com All my life I've wanted to be someone. I see now I should have been more specific.

View OleGrump's profile

OleGrump

507 posts in 885 days


#29 posted 09-09-2019 04:59 PM

IMHO, Shopsmith is an excellent choice for anyone who has very limited shop space. One has access to several machines in one. I know, some folks are gonna whine about changing it out from one function to another. BUT, like with ANY small space shop, one just has to PLAN out their projects in steps. Even folks with dedicated machines in small shops have to mount them on casters and roll them out and into position to use them, so there’s no real difference.
Dad’s best friend had a shopsmith for decades, and it did everything he wanted to it to do for him, including rebuilding vintage buggies, surreys and horse drawn wagons.

-- OleGrump

View Brian Talbert's profile

Brian Talbert

37 posts in 611 days


#30 posted 09-10-2019 01:30 AM



... it looks like the ends are permanently mounted to the pipes. Am I wrong?

They are definitely removable. Take a look at this image. The lower bars are held in with pressure from the tube lock bar, identified as 16 and 3 in the diagram. The upper bars are held in place by set screws, 26 and 27 in the diagram.

-- www.instagram.com/w.brian.talbert/

View Lee Barker's profile

Lee Barker

2172 posts in 3391 days


#31 posted 09-10-2019 04:06 AM

Aha! Thank you. The ol’ tube lock bar only viewable from the ventral side trick, successfully pranked upon the ignorant self. Life is good. I appreciate the help!

-- "...in his brain, which is as dry as the remainder biscuit after a voyage, he hath strange places cramm'd with observation, the which he vents in mangled forms." --Shakespeare, "As You Like It"

Have your say...

You must be signed in to reply.

DISCLAIMER: Any posts on LJ are posted by individuals acting in their own right and do not necessarily reflect the views of LJ. LJ will not be held liable for the actions of any user.

Latest Projects | Latest Blog Entries | Latest Forum Topics

HomeRefurbers.com