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Cabinet Saw Advice Needed

by codysmith1124
posted 02-14-2018 02:29 AM


35 replies so far

View ppg677's profile

ppg677

218 posts in 1365 days


#1 posted 02-14-2018 03:35 AM

In cabinet saws, SawStop is the way to go. I have a PCS 1.75 and never feel limited by the HP. In fact I keep a 50t blade on there even when ripping 8/4 hard wood.

View MrUnix's profile

MrUnix

7478 posts in 2708 days


#2 posted 02-14-2018 03:40 AM

I would have kept the PM66… you can’t find a better built saw today ;-)

Cheers,
Brad

-- Brad in FL - In Dog I trust... everything else is questionable

View Charlie H.'s profile

Charlie H.

388 posts in 1159 days


#3 posted 02-14-2018 03:51 AM

Congratulations on your retirement.
I just retired too and I think I want to spend lots of time woodworking.
I don’t think of myself as old, but the days of picking up a sheet of 3/4” plywood are history so my abilities are obviously diminished too.
My tablesaw doesn’t have any safety features either.
Its 1 3/4hp, I use regular blades and for the most part it does fine.
Cutting thick 2” hardwood can bog it down some.
I was gung-ho on replacing my saw with a sawstop but have decided to wait a year and see if woodworking really is my go to activity.
If I do replace the saw I am pretty sure I will go with a 3hp just so I get more of an upgrade than the flesh sensing tech.
Good luck to you.

-- Regards, Charlie in Rowlett, TX --------I talk to myself, because sometimes I need expert advice.---------

View msinc's profile

msinc

567 posts in 1012 days


#4 posted 02-14-2018 03:57 AM

I have to ask…is there a reason that you feel like you might all of a sudden cut your finger off? Here is my take on a sawstop, and remember, this is just my opinion and will no doubt make some fanboys bawl like a fat dog. The sawstop feature that actually shuts it down if you touch the blade is about $1000 worth of gear on the saw. So, you pay roughly $3K for it and for what the saw is actually for you got a $2K saw. If I thought I was $1000 certain I would cut off a finger I would find another hobby!!! Also, it cost around $100 to get the saw back up and running again and if I understand correctly another blade {more money…$75-$100 depending on the blade} also, if you accidentally touch the blade while it is running and the gizmo activates. That seems like a ridiculous amount of money to line up to spend just to own a table saw. The fanboy comeback is always, “what’s your finger worth??” They say this as if a table saw cannot be operated safely at all. Been at this since I was a kid in high school, 40 years ago and I have never even come close to a table saw accident. Might have saved a few arms and fingers on a radial arm saw…but a table saw is just not that inherently unsafe if at all.
Now, if you are an alcoholic and/or you habitually smoke a lot of dope then it might be a good idea…I know a lot of drunks and I know a few fellas that smoke that wacky weed…they all still have all ten fingers and toes.
Again, this is just my personal opinion, fan boys can get over it….or not, I could care less. But I suggest you put all your money towards a great saw not an unnecessary gizmo. On the other hand, if it makes you feel good then go for it.

View rcs47's profile

rcs47

210 posts in 3638 days


#5 posted 02-14-2018 04:42 AM

Happy retirement!
I’ve got the 1.75 HP contractor sawstop because they didn’t have the pro series when I got mine. I would have bought the pro if they had it because the motor hangs out on the contractor. I’m running 120V and I have cut 2.25” red oak. I adjust my push rate. I will change to 240V with the next house.

My Dad ran a 1 HP Unisaw @ 240V in his cabinet shop that we used for all lumber cutting. It would cut as fast as you could push the wood (our hardwood choices were ash, red birch, and alder). When he closed the shop after 40 years, he rewired the saw to 120V and it would not cut anything, just trip the breaker. He rewired it back to 240V, adding it to the garage and the old saw was back.

That’s my first recommendation – use 240V.

Riving knife is #2. Sawstop has one. Many other saws have them too. Dad’s shop had a saw with a large table we used to break down sheets of plywood, but it was old, did not riving knife, from the 40’s, and 5 HP. This saw has thrown wood at me (you really get the arc on the bottom of the piece of wood from the blade like they show in the pictures, and it hurts), even thrown a piece 60’ breaking the front window.

The deciding factor for me on sawstop was my Dad. This was a man that had made his living using table saws for 40+ years, and he told me a story about nicking his fingers on the blade. The same guy that taught me how to use a saw without any guards in a production shop (the jointer had a guard, but nothing else). I was working in the shop at 10.

Side note – back in the 70s, I remember retired guys coming in to buy the odd piece of plywood. I would see them on a regular basis, then not see them for weeks. Then they would come in again missing their right thumb from pushing the wood through the blade. Sometimes just the tip, sometimes the whole thumb.

Back on topic – I don’t run a table saw every day the way I used to when I was working for my Dad. I’m not as young as I was when I was working for my Dad. My hands shake a little, usually when I don’t want them to shake. There might be someone around the saw when it’s running. So I got a sawstop – I don’t care about their politics.

A couple of points, buy at least one extra break cartridge for the regular and dado to have on hand just in case.

EVERY time you change the blade, check the blade to break space.

Talking to the shops that run sawstops, their trips have mainly been from people running out tapes to check measurements contacting the blade as it is spinning down. The circuit is still live until the blade stops.

Good luck in your retirement.

-- Doug - As my Dad taught me, you're not a cabinet maker until you can hide your mistakes.

View knotscott's profile

knotscott

8332 posts in 3884 days


#6 posted 02-14-2018 10:39 AM

The PM66 was one of the finest American style industrial cabinet saws ever made, so you’ll likely not want to step back much. The Saw Stop PCS is a very nice saw if you get the T-Glide fence upgrade. Even though it’s not a necessity, I’ll suggest sticking with the 3hp motor instead of getting a smaller one. There is a notable and significant difference in that upgrade, plus it’ll fit the budget, and you obviously have 220v….no reason not to. Having extra power never hurts, will allow you to dictate the pace, will be less sensitive to blade changes, and should lead to longer motor life. I’d hate to see you spend that much on a saw and feel like you settled for less than you wanted.

-- Happiness is like wetting your pants...everyone can see it, but only you can feel the warmth....

View avsmusic1's profile

avsmusic1

528 posts in 1194 days


#7 posted 02-14-2018 11:54 AM

What I’m thinking (and reading thus far in the comments) is, no, there isn’t a direct competitor w/ the safety mechanisms you’re looking for. I would vote for the 3hp just because I like the extra power for the rare occasions I may need it. I’m also guessing you’re PM was a 3 or 5hp model so you’re probably used to having it.

Since you’ve already made the call to sell the PM I’ll spare you any personal opinions on the sawstop vs PM comparison. I will, however, congratulate you on your retirement and I hope you have the opportunity to make some sawdust soon! Can’t wait to see some of your work

View Redoak49's profile

Redoak49

4182 posts in 2497 days


#8 posted 02-14-2018 12:08 PM

“Fanboys howl like a fat dog” sounds like someone is,a Sawstop hater.

The Sawstop is a very well built saw. I have one and it is solid with great fit and finish.

Part of my reasoning for getting the Sawstop was that I was getting older and wanted the increased safety.

I have the 3 hp PCS so I can not comment on the 1-3/4” hp. My son has the 1-3/4 hp one and has no issues. He bought one because his job relies on his fingers.

View msinc's profile

msinc

567 posts in 1012 days


#9 posted 02-14-2018 12:17 PM


“Fanboys howl like a fat dog” sounds like someone is,a Sawstop hater.

The Sawstop is a very well built saw. I have one and it is solid with great fit and finish.

Part of my reasoning for getting the Sawstop was that I was getting older and wanted the increased safety.

I have the 3 hp PCS so I can not comment on the 1-3/4” hp. My son has the 1-3/4 hp one and has no issues. He bought one because his job relies on his fingers.

- Redoak49

I don’t hate anything…well except for spending $1000 plus for something I just do not need. Glad you got one, glad you like it and especially glad you got what you wanted. If that’s what it takes to make someone feel comfortable using a saw then I certainly got no problems with it, but it is not for me. I was told that the saw had to be running for the gizmo to blow…now I read that it will do it if the saw is winding down and gets touched by a tape blade. $150.00 every time you touch the blade with a tape when spinning down??? Absolutely ridiculous….to me.

View ppg677's profile

ppg677

218 posts in 1365 days


#10 posted 02-14-2018 01:20 PM

FYI to the original poster—there is a lot if hate towards SawStop on here. It’s a $1000 insurance policy. It will probably never save your finger. A lot of lumberjockers here claim they don’t need it. But you’ll find plenty of people (like myself) who appreciate the airbags in the rare case you’re human and make a mental mistake.

IMHO, you’ve made a wise decision to get a safer saw (including one with a riving knife which is arguably the most important safety feature these days).

View Tennessee's profile

Tennessee

2901 posts in 3023 days


#11 posted 02-14-2018 01:44 PM

Codysmith, I am sure you are totally confused by now…
Truth is, a lot of people feel much safer with the Sawstop lineup, and that is fine for them.

Me, I just cannot afford one of them.
I run a humble Rigid 4512, (also much hated by a lot of people on here who got lemons), and it has been a horse for me for everything I do. Now that I am into segmented turnings, it is true and gives me what I want with my Incra Miter on it.

If you feel safer with a Sawstop, by all means get one. For me, I’ve been cutting wood with various tablesaws and radial arm saws since my teens. My first “table saw” was actually a circular saw mounted upside down in a cheap plywood table with a foot switch on it, the hand switch taped in the on position. I can remember the night I put a piece of wood right through the wall of my garage with my radial arm saw, trying to push wood through it. Got away from me, and off it went. I did know to stand off to the side, but my eyes never focused on it in flight. Just it punching the hole in my wall.

I do believe it is all about respect. My worst accidents have actually been on power sanders, where I thought in terms of how safe these must be, with no teeth, only to have the wood fly away and me push my fingers into 80 grit flying along. Takes just milliseconds to get down to bone, BTW…

I personally do not see a Sawstop in my future. Too much money for me, and every time I tripped the thing I would be without while I went out to spend more money on cartridges.

-- Tsunami Guitars and Custom Woodworking, Cleveland, TN

View PJKS's profile

PJKS

62 posts in 1030 days


#12 posted 02-14-2018 01:47 PM

Why would your tape measure be that close to your saw blade ??

-- Pat / Colorado

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Blindhog

132 posts in 1557 days


#13 posted 02-14-2018 01:55 PM

Congratulations on your retirement! I’ve been retired for a couple of years and will reach 70 this year (good lord willing and the creek don’t rise). While I like to think the ol’noggin still has some zip left, my physical skills have diminished, albeit very slightly. I look at it like my baseball play; I gave it up when the brain said, “glove down, but the body couldn’t respond quick enough to stop the ball from going between my legs”.
I purchased the 3hp PCS model from SawStop and have not been disappointed. Very high quality design and execution. I bought the PCS mobile base and love the ability to move the saw to provide space for different operations. My shop is a converted 3-car garage. My choice was based on product quality and the unique safety feature that can’t be underestimated. As my doctor told me, ” the last thing you want to do is have regret about not having this safety feature when you’re sitting in the emergency room with a Dixie cup full of fingers”.
Good luck in your shop build, enjoy the entire process. Remember, it’s the journey more than the destination.

-- Don't let perfection get in the way of plenty good enough

View BobHall's profile

BobHall

67 posts in 1794 days


#14 posted 02-14-2018 02:50 PM

Cody, let me add my congratulations on your retirement! I am few years out and share the dream of spending my retirement in a nice shop making stuff I love and not pecking on my keyboard because it pays well. If your main question was ” is there anything else like Sawstop?” then I’m pretty sure the answer is no. I suppose sooner or later their patents will begin to expire and others will pick up the technology, but you need one now, right? As an “old machine guy” I don’t have anything newer than the 1960s, but that is a choice I made. My saws are not as safe as a Sawstop, and that’s pretty much that! Personally I’d think about the cost more in terms of the replacement cartridge and blade and not the ”$1000” which still puts the Sawstop about the same cost as a Unisaw. Either price would seem like nothing at all if it saved me from even a minor injury. Get the big motor too by the way, so you won’t wonder if you need it. Have fun, make sawdust God Bless!

-- Bob "jack of all trades, master of none"

View AlmostRetired's profile

AlmostRetired

220 posts in 1223 days


#15 posted 02-14-2018 03:42 PM

Cody,

I wish that my screen name was more true about my retirement status. I’m about 3 years from retiring form the Navy after what will be 25 years. I started woodworking a few years ago and the family has gorwn into the hobby with me. I want tnothing to d with the above debate but based on safety for the family and I, and almost every review I read and received from word of mouth, the SawStop was the right way to go for me. I ended up with the PCS 3HP. The saw has been amazing for the amount of time I have had it and it does eas my nerves a little knowing the backup is there.

Roger

View rcs47's profile

rcs47

210 posts in 3638 days


#16 posted 02-14-2018 03:47 PM

Why would your tape measure be that close to your saw blade ??

—Pat / Colorado

The guys were saying workers would cut stock off using a miter gauge, then pull out their tape to check, hitting the blade during spin down – BANG.

I took that to heart and make sure the blade has stopped before I take out my tape.

-- Doug - As my Dad taught me, you're not a cabinet maker until you can hide your mistakes.

View Andre's profile

Andre

2794 posts in 2315 days


#17 posted 02-14-2018 04:15 PM

Workshop is a great way to spend retirement time, when you get a chance to get to it?
3 Grangirls demand a lot of my time.
I left the race 5 years ago, had built a workshop before I went on a budget.
Found a 1.75hp USA Delta that had not been assembled yet and really don’t think
I need more, like or want well? As other have stated saw runs nicer when you feed it
220V. and as stated before I knock down any sheets with a track saw, mine is yellow.
Every person has different needs and “wants” as I age I actually get more enjoyment
from hand tools, now just need to learn how to sharpen them hand saws!
Funny I have cut myself many times with hands saws but never on the table saw!

-- Lifting one end of the plank.

View Markmh1's profile

Markmh1

111 posts in 952 days


#18 posted 02-14-2018 04:30 PM

I had 1hp table saws most of my life and never had any issues. I just altered my speeds and feeds while using the optimum blade for the job. Those thin kerf blades really go.
When I decided to upgrade from my 1hp delta contractor, I looked at everything
I could find. I had it narrowed down between a PM2000 and a sawstop PCS. I didn’t believe the hype about the sawstop, I figured it to be a gimmick. I bought the absolute best saw I could find, IMO. I didn’t find the safety feature of the Sawstop to be $1K extra, or I wouldn’t have bought it.

My local hardware store had a 3hp in stock, this came with the 36” t-glide fence and better guard/dust collector. He didn’t charge me for delivery, so right there it was $200 less.

I’m glad I got the 3hp, this is much better than anything I’ve ever had before. As to the safety feature, my wife, doctor, and insurance agent were all thrilled I got a sawstop. I couldn’t believe all of them knew more about it than I did.
It must be true that God looks out for drunks and fools.

BTW, I’ve never tripped the stop. With a decent blade, thats a $150 excursion I don’t want to take.

Best of everything to you on your decision and your retirement.

Mark

View Fred Hargis's profile

Fred Hargis

5747 posts in 3002 days


#19 posted 02-14-2018 05:30 PM

I won’t get into the above debate about which saw, you’ve probably got more than you bargained for already. But I do want to congratulate you on retirement, and especially the woodworking start. When your retired it’s important to have a place to go and get out of your wife’s hair on occasion! (retired 16 years)

-- Our village hasn't lost it's idiot, he was elected to congress.

View Trout121180's profile

Trout121180

44 posts in 616 days


#20 posted 02-14-2018 07:22 PM

Like most everyone else I won’t go to far in detail but I will share a little. I own a saw stop and couldn’t be happier. Also just so you know you can actually purchase a 3hp motor from sawstop later down the road and pay someone to install it and it wouldn’t be that much more than buying the 3hp out right. And you could sell the 1.75hp motor. This was told to me by an actual sawstop employee and maybe decided to go this route. So here are some bullets on why I chose saw stop.

1. Safety safety safety. Some people talk about how they have been doing this for 30 years and never had an accident. Therefore have no need for a saw stop. And they may be right. I try to be a little bit more humble and tell myself someone somewhere who is better than me with more experience than me has had a table saw injury/accident. No one thinks they are going to cut off there finger. If they did they wouldn’t have used the saw in the first place.

2. Customer service. I recommend calling them. My experience with them was amazing. I talked to a real person that owns a sawstop and knew the machine inside and out. I know that if I have a question the answer is only a phone call away.

3.Quality. Sawstop has things figured out. As soon as i opened the instruction booklet I knew I made the right choice. The instructions are so detailed even I was able to put my saw together with little problems. All the parts are labeled and organized perfectly. And they even tell you how to stand the saw up correctly. If they spent this much time and money to perfect the instructions and manual I believe the same tone and effort was put into the machine as well.

I could go on and on but I think you get the point. I have owned my saw for a year. Switching cartridges or putting the saw in bypass mode is quick and easy and doesn’t even slow me down. I love my saw and even if it didn’t have the safety feature I would be happy with the product I have. And that’s the gods honest truth!!

-- Luke “I thought I was wrong once, but I was mistaken.” “If you wait till the last minute it only takes a minute.”

View clin's profile

clin

1067 posts in 1505 days


#21 posted 02-14-2018 09:58 PM

Cody welcome to LJ’s and happy retirement.

I’ve had a 3HP SawStop PCS for a few years now. Couldn’t be happier with it. I was not even in the market for a saw, but upgrading the hand-me-down saw I had didn’t make sense. When it came to a new saw, I liked the SawStop and the wife said “get the one that won’t cut off your fingers.”

I’m unaware of any, available in the USA, saws with a blade brake feature. Of course newer saws will have riving knives/splitters and that’s a simple but major safety improvement.

In the grand scheme of things, the premium you pay for a SawStop is insignificant over the life of the saw. Of course that can be said about most purchases, so in the end only you can decide what is an isn’t worth it. I see it as a form of insurance. If other power tools and machines had similar features, I’d likely buy those as well.

Concerning power, I think you have to look at how you’ve used the saw you had, it’s power rating and performance, and what you think you will do in the future. I got the 3 HP figuring, in for a penny, in for a pound. It’s probably unlikely you would not be able to make a cut with a 1.75 HP saw, but it may be easier. So if large cuts are something you do rarely, I’d bet the 1.75 HP would do you just fine. If you often cut large stock, I’d lean towards the 3 HP.

I’m not sure I’d put to much thought into where the saw is made, if quality is your concern. High quality or crap can be made anywhere.

With a $3-$4k budget, you can get a fully loaded SawStop PCS, with 3 HP, T-glide fence, overarm dust collection etc. If you get a SawStop PCS and want a mobile base for it, get the ICS mobile base rather than the PCS mobile base. It’s more maneuverable with all 4 swiveling casters, vs two fixed and two swivel in the PCS base.

I’ve set my off one time trying to run a metal miter gauge though it. I was up and running within 10 minutes. Much of that time was me just scratching my head trying to figure out why my saw blade disappeared. If I ever trigger it with my fingers or hand, I’ll be smiling as I replace the blade and cartridge. Knowing the saw just paid for itself several times over.

I however, treat the saw with all the same respect I would any machine.

Happy table saw shopping.

-- Clin

View Loren's profile

Loren

10477 posts in 4157 days


#22 posted 02-14-2018 10:04 PM

I like 12” saws and use a guard. I know
some people hate them but I don’t see the
value in the arguments against using one.

That said, some of the older guard designs
were wonky. Overarm guards and guards that
mount to a riving knife work quite well I’ve
found and seldom interfere with using the saw.

I guess I would see more value in the Sawstop
if the guard wasn’t there reminding me not to
touch the blade most of the time. Aside from
the brake, it’s just a 10” cabinet saw.

I have a small format slider. It’s pretty sweet.
Not something you could buy for $3-4k new
though.

View codysmith1124's profile

codysmith1124

3 posts in 611 days


#23 posted 02-14-2018 11:46 PM

Thanks all for the wonderful feedback. You’ve given me much to think about. Living in the cold Northeast I have a few weeks before I’ll get the itch to get back in my shop. I’ll use that time to continue my research. One problem for me is the lack of display models in my area. If I’m spending $3,500 I’d sure like to touch and feel what I might be buying. All my local sellers tell me they can order but they don’t have floor models.

What a great community to belong to, so much help available by just asking.

Thanks again for the input.

-- Kevin, https://kevinsmithwoodworking.wordpress.com/

View Mike_in_STL's profile

Mike_in_STL

993 posts in 1043 days


#24 posted 02-15-2018 12:13 AM

Get what you want, but with your budget, everyone is going to tell you to get a SawStop.

-- Sawdust makes me whole --Mike in STL

View coxhaus's profile

coxhaus

145 posts in 1403 days


#25 posted 02-15-2018 01:20 AM

Regardless of brand you never want to switch saws from a 3 hp to a 1.5 hp because you will not be happy. I switched from a Delta contractor saw to a Unisaw 3 hp and there is no comparison between the 2 saws. I would never go back.

View MrUnix's profile

MrUnix

7478 posts in 2708 days


#26 posted 02-15-2018 01:23 AM

Regardless of brand you never want to switch saws from a 3 hp to a 1.5 hp because you will not be happy.
- coxhaus

+1

And if you want a machine comparable to the PM66, then you need to be looking at the ICS, not the PCS. PCS is more comparable to a lighter PM1000, which would be a downgrade from your old machine IMO.

Cheers,
Brad

-- Brad in FL - In Dog I trust... everything else is questionable

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Knockonit

608 posts in 711 days


#27 posted 02-15-2018 01:49 AM

I’ve had a 3hp uni saw with uni fence for so long, not sure how i’d act with a new high dollar unit, lol.
I suspect a fella oughta buy what works for him, or her, and not look back. Problem is, IMO, assuming the saw will handle the safety issues will allow one to well. lets say not be as diligent, knowing that the saw is super duper special in that dept.
One thing i’ve learned having been in the const. and wood biz, for almost 50 years, safety, safety, and more. Accidents are usually a result of one being complacent with the situation, and being comfortable with the tool, I have always treated my tools well, but full well knowing they will bite, if I don’t do my part.

best of luck on a selection, kinda like buying shoes, won’t know till you’ve cut a mile of wood to see how it goes.
Rj in Az.

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avsmusic1

528 posts in 1194 days


#28 posted 02-15-2018 03:01 AM

Where in the NE are u located? The local wood crafts in CT have sawstop son the floor

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John_

213 posts in 2215 days


#29 posted 02-15-2018 03:05 AM

I don t hate anything…well except for spending $1000 plus for something I just do not need. Glad you got one, glad you like it and especially glad you got what you wanted. I…
- msinc

Reminds me of when I bought my last motorcycle. I had a choice of with or without ABS Brakes and the difference was just about $1,000… (I went without ABS by the way)

Cody – congratulations on your retirement :)

Things have changed over the years and I am not sure how or what your going to use your table saw for – but keep this in mind. TRACK SAW

In the ‘old days’ it was pretty common to have a full size cabinet saw surrounded by about an acre of outfeed tables – but nowadays if your going to be working with sheet goods (plywood, etc) a decent track saw can make short work of it. Much better than pushing a heavy 4’x’8 sheet through a blade. (3/4” mdf is easily 90 lbs and 3/4” ply is around 70-75) As I get older, I just don’t feel like trying to wrestle with it anymore and my wife sure appreciates not having to ‘help me’ :)

With that being said, you can easily get a decent track saw with several different tracks for that $1,000. (something to think about)

View Redoak49's profile

Redoak49

4182 posts in 2497 days


#30 posted 02-15-2018 12:48 PM

As I said earlier, I love my Sawstop PCS. I have had it for a number of years and no regrets. You need to take a road trip and go see one. Spending that kind of money, you should put your hands on one. If you were closer you could see mine.

A track saw is a great thing. Being older, I can no longer put a large sheet of plywood across the saw. A good track saw is a great tool.

View Mike_D_S's profile

Mike_D_S

596 posts in 2723 days


#31 posted 02-15-2018 08:58 PM

Well, I’m not all that old, but I’ll echo a track saw being a great thing. While I can muscle a full sheet of ply across the saw and outfeed, it’s no fun and a lot of time I end up with a cut that’s not all that straight.

I’ve been sort of on the fence about saw upgrades. You’ve got lots of opinions about Sawstop above. But at the end of the day, you are buying insurance with a deductible. The insurance costs $1000 for a lifetime (of the saw) policy and the deductible per event is $70+tax.

So if you’re like me and you pay the extra $15/month for 250/500 car insurance and the extra $100/year for full contents replacement value for the house, then buy your insurance and be a happy, content dude enjoying the high quality saw.

I don’t plan to get in an accident or for my house to burn down, but if one of those things happens I don’t want any more stress than absolutely necessary. And Sawstop seems the low stress route if you can swing the budget.

Mike

-- No honey, that's not new, I've had that forever......

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coxhaus

145 posts in 1403 days


#32 posted 02-15-2018 11:24 PM


I ve been sort of on the fence about saw upgrades. You ve got lots of opinions about Sawstop above. But at the end of the day, you are buying insurance with a deductible. The insurance costs $1000 for a lifetime (of the saw) policy and the deductible per event is $70+tax.
- MikeDS

I am not sure I understand. I thought if the Sawstop trips you have to buy a new mechenisum and saw blade. Doesn’t that cost more than $70.

View Mike_in_STL's profile

Mike_in_STL

993 posts in 1043 days


#33 posted 02-15-2018 11:53 PM

^^^SIGNIFICANTLY, unless you use crap blades.^^^^

-- Sawdust makes me whole --Mike in STL

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Mike_D_S

596 posts in 2723 days


#34 posted 02-16-2018 01:15 AM

Agreed, I was just referring to the blade break, but you do have to add in your blade cost.

So call it $180 then and we’ll call it junking a good blade each time.

But even restated as a $180 deductible, for me the same logic applies. Even if I trip it accidentally 2 or 3 times over five or ten years. I still apply the insurance analogy, I’m committing to spending maybe $1500 compared to the low probability of spending $10k+ for hand surgery and the stress and hassle of dealing with a potential injury.

I do personally know a guy who had a table saw accident. It didn’t make me run out and buy a sawstop and it didn’t make me scared to use my saw, but it did reinforce that crap sometimes happens. My buddy is now that one guy in xx thousand who had an accident.

It really comes down to personal risk preference and budget.

-- No honey, that's not new, I've had that forever......

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mtnwalton

58 posts in 1535 days


#35 posted 02-16-2018 05:13 AM

i bought a Grizzly last fall after needing an upgrade for retirement. Very happy with it. Most everyone that has a Sawstop seem in love with them and they do have great reviews on their quality. I would caution you though that kickbacks can cause the most frequent injuries and Sawstop doesn’t prevent them any more than other saws.

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