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View Karda's profile

epoxy whitens on drying

by Karda
posted 02-07-2018 01:00 AM


20 replies so far

View swirt's profile

swirt

3870 posts in 3331 days


#1 posted 02-07-2018 02:29 AM

Amazing Clear Cast stays clear [amazon link]. It is slow setting so gives air bubbles more of a chance to get out.

It is hard to say whether yours turned white because it cures that way, or because it just cured fast and ended up with a lot of air bubbles.

-- Galootish log blog, http://www.timberframe-tools.com

View Snowbeast's profile

Snowbeast

101 posts in 1697 days


#2 posted 02-07-2018 03:24 AM

Can’t offer any advice on epoxy but I will offer a different approach to crack filling.

Try packing the crack/hole with fine sanding dust and then drenching with CA. It will harden nicely and turn a very dark brown or black. It can be sanded smooth and it’s very difficult to tell that a repair was made.

This works well with dark woods or knots but the crack line is visible on lighter woods. Can be used as an accent feature, if desired.

View johnstoneb's profile

johnstoneb

3100 posts in 2532 days


#3 posted 02-07-2018 03:27 AM

Pictures always help

-- Bruce, Boise, ID

View Karda's profile

Karda

1484 posts in 913 days


#4 posted 02-07-2018 04:39 AM

I thoght of that but I am working on a maple piece the knot is dark brown, no dust that color. Nothing can be that easy for me

View Rich's profile

Rich

4391 posts in 948 days


#5 posted 02-07-2018 05:06 AM

The sanding dust/CA glue method mentioned earlier works great. Be sure to use thin CA. You can also get colored pigments for your epoxy to help blend in with where you’re applying it. System Three makes some, or you can use Mixol pigments available at Woodcraft.

Finally, epoxy putty is available in many colors that can be blended to further extend the color range. They are stable and sand easily.

-- Knowledge is not skill. Knowledge plus ten thousand times is skill. -- Shinichi Suzuki

View Karda's profile

Karda

1484 posts in 913 days


#6 posted 02-07-2018 05:16 AM

i have been thinking of colored epoxy. I had a nice piece of eucalyptus with some large craks I used thick CA but black would have been nice withe the red patterned wood

View MrUnix's profile

MrUnix

7357 posts in 2558 days


#7 posted 02-07-2018 05:21 AM

For that dark brown knot, mix your epoxy well, then add in some used coffee grounds. You can tint epoxy with any number of things you may have around the house.

Cheers,
Brad

-- Brad in FL - In Dog I trust... everything else is questionable

View Rich's profile

Rich

4391 posts in 948 days


#8 posted 02-07-2018 05:27 AM


For that dark brown knot, mix your epoxy well, then add in some used coffee grounds. You can tint epoxy with any number of things you may have around the house.

- MrUnix

French or Italian roast?

-- Knowledge is not skill. Knowledge plus ten thousand times is skill. -- Shinichi Suzuki

View Karda's profile

Karda

1484 posts in 913 days


#9 posted 02-07-2018 05:48 AM

i would if I could but I don’t drink coffee at home. maybe can con the waitress out of some

View Rich's profile

Rich

4391 posts in 948 days


#10 posted 02-07-2018 05:56 AM


i would if I could but I don t drink coffee at home. maybe can con the waitress out of some

- Karda

You could go dumpster-diving out back of your local Denny’s. Just don’t get caught. It’d be hard to explain.

Edit: On second thought Starbucks might offer a wider array of grounds to choose from. It could become your signature look.

-- Knowledge is not skill. Knowledge plus ten thousand times is skill. -- Shinichi Suzuki

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MrUnix

7357 posts in 2558 days


#11 posted 02-07-2018 06:16 AM

i would if I could but I don t drink coffee at home. maybe can con the waitress out of some
- Karda

It doesn’t have to be used… I just hate wasting good coffee :)

You can color epoxy with just about anything. Chalk works well and can be had in a ton of different colors. Sawdust works as well, and will be darker than original. Metal shavings, crushed rock, various spices found in your cabinet, talcum powder, graphite (from pencil shavings), many paints, inks and dyes, shredded fabrics, aluminum foil, etc… just use your imagination and if unsure, test a small sample first.

Cheers,
Brad

-- Brad in FL - In Dog I trust... everything else is questionable

View Karda's profile

Karda

1484 posts in 913 days


#12 posted 02-07-2018 06:17 AM

ok but what flavor is best.

View Rich's profile

Rich

4391 posts in 948 days


#13 posted 02-07-2018 06:38 AM


You can color epoxy with just about anything. Chalk works well and can be had in a ton of different colors. Sawdust works as well, and will be darker than original. Metal shavings, crushed rock, various spices found in your cabinet, talcum powder, graphite (from pencil shavings), many paints, inks and dyes, shredded fabrics, aluminum foil, etc… just use your imagination and if unsure, test a small sample first.

- MrUnix

Honestly, you’re joking, right? This is LumberJocks, not Martha Stewart.

Like I said, there are pigments for epoxy that you can blend to any color.

-- Knowledge is not skill. Knowledge plus ten thousand times is skill. -- Shinichi Suzuki

View MrUnix's profile

MrUnix

7357 posts in 2558 days


#14 posted 02-07-2018 06:45 AM

Honestly, you re joking, right?
- Rich

Nope.. dead serious – they all work and work well. Coffee however is probably the most common.

Cheers,
Brad

-- Brad in FL - In Dog I trust... everything else is questionable

View Tony_S's profile

Tony_S

965 posts in 3442 days


#15 posted 02-07-2018 11:28 AM

Your man card has officially been revoked Brad…..Go hang out at Marthajocks fer chrisakes!!
You can teach them how to change out the bearings on their food processors or something ;)

-- It is the mark of an educated mind to be able to entertain a thought without accepting it. Aristotle

View Nubsnstubs's profile

Nubsnstubs

1534 posts in 2089 days


#16 posted 02-07-2018 02:29 PM

Wow, picking on Brad!! he is the most helpful person here, and you want to rename him “Martha”. hehehe

We should be picking on Mike. He’s been here over a year now, and I can’t believe he hasn’t seen at least one post on filling cracks.

Mike, here is another suggestion. If the crack or hole is less than dowel sizes, drill through it and insert a dowel. cut it off, and if need be, drill another hole, repeat until the crack is filled with dowels. What happens when drilling through a crack, the two sides if they make contact with the dowel, the glue used stabilizes the crack and makes it solid. If you have a long crack, multiple dowels will look like a chain, giving it an feature additional feature…........ Jerry (in Tucson)

-- Jerry (in Tucson) www.woodturnerstools.com

View CharlesNeil's profile

CharlesNeil

2477 posts in 4229 days


#17 posted 02-07-2018 03:21 PM

Fast setting epoxies do that , air gets trapped in side from mixing, and doesnt escape before setting .
Slow setting is the best and even then exhale on it, or use a propane torch to flash over it , it will clear the “bubbles”

Dry ice flowing over will as well but a little impracticable

View Rich's profile

Rich

4391 posts in 948 days


#18 posted 02-07-2018 03:39 PM


Fast setting epoxies do that , air gets trapped in side from mixing, and doesnt escape before setting .
Slow setting is the best and even then exhale on it, or use a propane torch to flash over it , it will clear the “bubbles”

Dry ice flowing over will as well but a little impracticable

- CharlesNeil

I’ve used a heat gun and found it does bring up bubbles near the surface, but for a deeper pour there were still bubbles below. It might not matter for this application, but I do fills prior to milling mesquite and those little bubbles are a real headache to deal with when they get exposed by the planer or saw. Any effort spent to remove them to begin with is worth it.

I’ve had good luck using a vacuum system to remove the bubbles from the epoxy before I pour. I did a blog post on it yesterday:

http://lumberjocks.com/RichTaylor/blog/118617

-- Knowledge is not skill. Knowledge plus ten thousand times is skill. -- Shinichi Suzuki

View Karda's profile

Karda

1484 posts in 913 days


#19 posted 02-07-2018 04:55 PM

now don’t be to hard on him there us a little of Martha in all of us

View Gene Howe's profile

Gene Howe

11486 posts in 3787 days


#20 posted 02-07-2018 05:41 PM

For color, I just use acrylic artist’s paint in tubes. A few bucks at Wal*mart will get you enough varied colors to last a lifetime. Just a dab in 6oz of mix will get you a solid color.

-- Gene 'The true soldier fights not because he hates what is in front of him, but because he loves what is behind him.' G. K. Chesterton

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