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View needshave's profile

What species are these

by needshave
posted 02-05-2018 06:17 AM


20 replies so far

View AlaskaGuy's profile

AlaskaGuy

5415 posts in 2852 days


#1 posted 02-05-2018 09:51 AM

I don’t know. But in 1850 there a pretty good chance they used a local wood source. I’m guessing the house isn’t located in the middle of death valley. Maybe you could give a location of the house. It may help track down the type of Alder it is.

-- Alaskan's for Global warming!

View knotscott's profile

knotscott

8343 posts in 3919 days


#2 posted 02-05-2018 10:27 AM

Kinda hard to tell, but I’d guess oak or chestnut for the top one.

-- Happiness is like wetting your pants...everyone can see it, but only you can feel the warmth....

View WDHLT15's profile

WDHLT15

1819 posts in 3019 days


#3 posted 02-05-2018 12:20 PM

Could also be ash.

-- Danny Located in Perry, GA. Forester. Wood-Mizer LT40HD35 Sawmill. Nyle L53 Dehumidification Kiln. hamsleyhardwood.com

View needshave's profile

needshave

177 posts in 2502 days


#4 posted 02-05-2018 03:18 PM

The boards are 6” wide, tongue and groove. All of the boards have a lot of knots (both pictures) dark red in color ( wood has been stained at some point) The board in the top picture can be seen from the basement, it is planed on the walking surface but rough sawn on the bottom seating surface. With the door casing out, the boards measure 1.25 in thickness. it holds up very well and appears, to me to wear like oak but look like a pine. It’s pretty hard.

The second board I can not see the bottom side of, but it is softer., plenty of knots all very solid and firm. Has a reddish look to the grain and knots. This floor may be an overlay.

The house is located in Central Ohio. I will try and get some better pictures.

View tomsteve's profile

tomsteve

979 posts in 1762 days


#5 posted 02-05-2018 03:29 PM



-the rest of the house is oak and heartwood /SYP

- needshave

id take a gander to guess ya have those 2 in the pics

View Alex Lane's profile

Alex Lane

552 posts in 4433 days


#6 posted 02-05-2018 03:29 PM

An old timer who worked on our 1919 house said the original trim may have been sassafras. All I know is that it turns any nail into a noodle if you don’t drill a pilot hole

-- Alex...builder of wooden wings for vintage sport biplanes...I'm your wingman :)

View TheFridge's profile

TheFridge

10859 posts in 2029 days


#7 posted 02-05-2018 04:17 PM

Ash alder.

-- Shooting down the walls of heartache. Bang bang. I am. The warrior.

View needshave's profile

needshave

177 posts in 2502 days


#8 posted 02-05-2018 10:08 PM

Fridge,

Do you think both of those are Alder?

View Ripper70's profile

Ripper70

1349 posts in 1452 days


#9 posted 02-05-2018 11:08 PM



Fridge,

Do you think both of those are Alder?

- needshave

To TheFridge, everything is Alder! To TheFridge “Alder World’s a Stage”!

-- "You know, I'm such a great driver, it's incomprehensible that they took my license away." --Vince Ricardo

View TheFridge's profile

TheFridge

10859 posts in 2029 days


#10 posted 02-05-2018 11:39 PM

Ashy alder of course

-- Shooting down the walls of heartache. Bang bang. I am. The warrior.

View firefighterontheside's profile (online now)

firefighterontheside

20639 posts in 2400 days


#11 posted 02-06-2018 12:14 AM

Top looks like oak, although one board could be walnut.
Bottom picture looks like white pine.

-- Bill M. "People change, walnut doesn't" by Gene.

View needshave's profile

needshave

177 posts in 2502 days


#12 posted 02-06-2018 12:16 AM

So I have been doing some research on ALder online. I personally have not seen it for sale at our local sawmill hardwood supplier. He sells wood primarily grown in this region. Research shows that it is primarily grown in the pacific northwest. Being in Ohio, and Built-in 1850, Alder may not been immediately available in this area, if what I read is true. I’m wondering if this might be an ash?

View needshave's profile

needshave

177 posts in 2502 days


#13 posted 02-06-2018 12:25 AM

Fire,

I think the second picture/boards is a pine. It has so many knots in it, it almost looks like knotty pine. It is quite beautiful though, has a very warm look to it. AS far as the first picture is concerned; all the boards are the same some boards do have a grain pattern similar to oak, but very knotty with red solid knots. I’m sure it was cut locally in the 1850’s and used. its a brick structure, but all the floor joists and roof members are oak and hickory.

View msinc's profile

msinc

567 posts in 1047 days


#14 posted 02-06-2018 12:42 AM

Top one is definitely white oak. The bottom also looks like oak to me, just a different color stain. It would be very helpful if you could sand the second one down to bare wood and take the photo a little closer.

View Desert_Woodworker's profile

Desert_Woodworker

1940 posts in 1758 days


#15 posted 02-06-2018 12:53 AM



Ash alder.

- TheFridge

The proper order is Alder Ash

-- Desert_Woodworker

View Mario's profile

Mario

186 posts in 3939 days


#16 posted 02-06-2018 01:19 AM

Ash for the first…...some sort of pine for the second

View needshave's profile

needshave

177 posts in 2502 days


#17 posted 02-06-2018 03:51 AM

This is a little better picture of the Kitchen floor or the second picture I showed in my original posting. 5.5” wide, lot of knots all very solid. Grain pattern and knots, to me, appears to be pine. The kitchen is one step down, depressed, from the rest of the house. So if this is pine, it could be an overlay to the original floor. But then again, maybe not.

Any more thoughts, since this picture is a little clearer?

View EricH4964's profile

EricH4964

11 posts in 659 days


#18 posted 02-06-2018 04:01 AM

My best guess was American Chestnut. I googled some photos and found the following site

http://atimber.com/american-chestnut/

It seems to match pretty good. Also going with white oak for the other as Desert_woodworker stated.

-- Semper Fi

View needshave's profile

needshave

177 posts in 2502 days


#19 posted 02-07-2018 03:12 PM

Eric,

I think you may be right. Talking with a local historian Chestnut was used in these old houses back in 1850. He showed me a local commercial space know as the Art Castle and it has floors that look exactly the same. They are documented as Chestnut. Thanks so much for your efforts. Appreciate the help of all.

View GR8HUNTER's profile

GR8HUNTER

6606 posts in 1256 days


#20 posted 02-07-2018 03:23 PM

the 1 is Red Ash Alder :<))

GO FRIDGE

-- Tony---- Reinholds,Pa.------ REMEMBER TO ALWAYS HAVE FUN

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