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Contrasting color in Pecan Logs

by Randy_ATX
posted 02-02-2018 01:17 PM


18 replies so far

View Tennessee's profile

Tennessee

2901 posts in 3049 days


#1 posted 02-02-2018 01:38 PM

I’m no tree fungus expert, but something is invading the tree, from the center out. The fine small black line on the outside edge of the dark area, that looks like fungal infestation. Either way, I’d think the tree was on a clock and needed to come down.

-- Tsunami Guitars and Custom Woodworking, Cleveland, TN

View bondogaposis's profile

bondogaposis

5553 posts in 2886 days


#2 posted 02-02-2018 01:44 PM

Beginning stages of spalting. Its caused by a fungus and probably why the trees have lost their vigor and are being removed.

-- Bondo Gaposis

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Sparks500

255 posts in 865 days


#3 posted 02-02-2018 01:46 PM

Save the scraps for the smoker!

-- A good day is any day that you're alive....

View soob's profile

soob

271 posts in 1743 days


#4 posted 02-02-2018 05:22 PM

It’s almost certainly rot. The issue is whether it’s soft or not. If it’s still hard you can use it. But it’s probably not going to be usable.

Pecan rots very easily.

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Randy_ATX

881 posts in 2977 days


#5 posted 02-02-2018 06:36 PM

Thanks for the replies so far. Funny thing is the discolored wood feels just as hard as the white part.

-- Randy -- Austin, TX by way of Northwest (Woodville), OH

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MrUnix

7499 posts in 2733 days


#6 posted 02-02-2018 06:44 PM

I’ve found a few logs like that before, although they were in red oak, not pecan. The dark center portion is just as hard, if not harder, than the surrounding wood. I’ve never given it much thought really – as long as it was sound wood. And it does look really nice when used in it’s entirety – like in these bowls:

Cheers,
Brad

-- Brad in FL - In Dog I trust... everything else is questionable

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soob

271 posts in 1743 days


#7 posted 02-02-2018 06:46 PM

Well, I’ve seen it a lot, too, and in my experience it’s usually mush. Test the hardness with a screwdriver or a small knife.

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Randy_ATX

881 posts in 2977 days


#8 posted 02-02-2018 09:36 PM

Those are great looking bowls, Brad. It does look like the same thing I am seeing.

Seems like I was lucky with a couple of these so far, as it has not progressed into an advanced rot in the few that were harvested. There are a few more to take down.

-- Randy -- Austin, TX by way of Northwest (Woodville), OH

View Gene Howe's profile

Gene Howe

11870 posts in 3963 days


#9 posted 02-02-2018 09:43 PM

If it’s sound, it’s gonna make some beautiful lumber.

-- Gene 'The true soldier fights not because he hates what is in front of him, but because he loves what is behind him.' G. K. Chesterton

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Randy_ATX

881 posts in 2977 days


#10 posted 02-02-2018 09:48 PM

Agreed, Gene. I cut this one into a 10’ log, and the color was up there too (10’ up from the stump).

-- Randy -- Austin, TX by way of Northwest (Woodville), OH

View Jim Jakosh's profile (online now)

Jim Jakosh

23514 posts in 3640 days


#11 posted 02-03-2018 12:16 AM

Looks like spalting. It will make a beautiful piece.

Jim

-- Jim Jakosh.....Practical Wood Products...........Learn something new every day!! Variety is the Spice of Life!!

View oldwood's profile

oldwood

162 posts in 1779 days


#12 posted 02-03-2018 03:00 AM

You are in for a treat!

View WDHLT15's profile

WDHLT15

1819 posts in 3011 days


#13 posted 02-03-2018 12:18 PM

It is the right color for heartwood. I believe that it is heartwood formation beginning. Heartwood in pecan can be very irregular. Some type of stress might have triggered it. In any case, heartwood in pecan can be dramatically figured with the brown and black colors.

-- Danny Located in Perry, GA. Forester. Wood-Mizer LT40HD35 Sawmill. Nyle L53 Dehumidification Kiln. hamsleyhardwood.com

View Redoak49's profile

Redoak49

4229 posts in 2523 days


#14 posted 02-03-2018 12:38 PM

Hickory and Pecan both have this and are closely related trees.

View Gene Howe's profile

Gene Howe

11870 posts in 3963 days


#15 posted 02-03-2018 02:38 PM

Thanks, Danny. There’s a source for pecan lumber here in AZ. I buy mesquite and Pistachio there. I’m gonna look for pecan like that next time I’m there.

-- Gene 'The true soldier fights not because he hates what is in front of him, but because he loves what is behind him.' G. K. Chesterton

View Lazyman's profile

Lazyman

4080 posts in 1922 days


#16 posted 02-03-2018 03:50 PM

That is just the heartwood. Heartwood forms when the cells die and stop transmitting water up the tree. This causes organic “stuff” to collect there and turns the dead cells a different color. Sometimes this makes them more resistant to rot but in other species, the heart wood losses its resistance and may actually start to rot because it is dead. Entire rings do not necessarily die at the same time so it is not uncommon to see that sort of irregular pattern in certain species.

Unless it is too punky, it’ll make some beautiful projects.

-- Nathan, TX -- Hire the lazy man. He may not do as much work but that's because he will find a better way.

View Randy_ATX's profile

Randy_ATX

881 posts in 2977 days


#17 posted 02-04-2018 12:55 AM

Thanks, Danny. That is some beautiful lumber you posted! I think you and Lazy are right – its the formation of heartwood. Neat stuff. Can’t wait to process it into lumber.

-- Randy -- Austin, TX by way of Northwest (Woodville), OH

View WDHLT15's profile

WDHLT15

1819 posts in 3011 days


#18 posted 02-04-2018 12:43 PM



Hickory and Pecan both have this and are closely related trees.

- Redoak49

Pecan is a hickory. Two types of hickory:

1). The true hickories. Leaflets 5 to 7. Nuts are round.
2). Pecan hickories. Leaflets more than 7. Nuts are flattened or elongated.

Hickory is in the walnut family. The wood of the true hickories and the pecan hickories is indistinguishable except for one tiny characteristic. The apotrachial parenchyma that runs between the pores is only present in the latewood in hickory. In pecan, there are some strands of apotrachial parenchyma in the outer portion of the earlywood. It takes magnification to see this.

You can see the parenchyma in the 4th photo on this excellent wood ID site in the pic that is in the lower right hand quadrant. The parenchyma are the little horizontal lines that run between the pores.

http://hobbithouseinc.com/personal/woodpics/hickory.htm

Sorry about the technical description, not trying to be a show-off or know-it-all. But that is what you have to see to tell the pecan hickories from the true hickories. BTW, parenchyma are living cells that are in the wood in trees. Most cells in wood are cells that conduct water. They are dead in that there is no nucleus or protoplasm. There are essentially transport vessels. The parenchyma are living cells with a nucleus and protoplasm that exist in tiny strands in the wood. Many radiate out like little ribbons from the center of the tree like spokes, and these are medullary rays. These rays, when sliced open a certain way when the wood is sawn create the ray fleck figure that you see in quartersawn oak like seen in this white oak board.

The tree uses parenchyma cells to store sugar made by the leaves during photosynthesis. It is these sugars in these cells that the dreaded beetles, like the lycid powderpost beetles that we all hate, feed on.

-- Danny Located in Perry, GA. Forester. Wood-Mizer LT40HD35 Sawmill. Nyle L53 Dehumidification Kiln. hamsleyhardwood.com

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