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View Karda's profile

glue block help

by Karda
posted 01-26-2018 01:04 AM


10 replies so far

View Nubsnstubs's profile

Nubsnstubs

1534 posts in 2087 days


#1 posted 01-26-2018 04:18 AM

Make a rim chuck with a glue block attached. After the glue has set, put the face of the rim chuck up against the chuck jaws using the live center to hold it in place. Turn the block to fit your chuck. After fitting it to the chuck, turn it around, mount into your chuck. Measure the rim diameter of your bowl. If you have more than one bowl, start with the smallest. Transfer your size to the rim chuck and turn a groove as wide as the bowl thickness. After fitted, set the bowl rim into the groove (snug fit), and bring up the tailstock. Flatten, smooth or redo the bottom to fit a glue block. Pull the tailstock back, mount the glue block to the bottom, and bring up the tailstock to apply pressure for about 30 minutes. When the glue is set, remove the bowl from the rim chuck and let it set overnight. Re-turn the bowl. When finished, remount the rim chuck, and remove the glue block.

Get the next bowl, and do the same by measuring and fitting it the rim chuck. If it’s larger, just make the groove fit snug on the outside diameter of the rim of the bowl.

Simple. .............. Jerry (in Tucson)

-- Jerry (in Tucson) www.woodturnerstools.com

View Karda's profile

Karda

1482 posts in 911 days


#2 posted 01-26-2018 07:18 AM

Hi Jerry how are ya its be a while. I kinda get the idea but what is a rim chuck. what kinda of glue, carpenters CA or what thanks

View Andybb's profile

Andybb

1884 posts in 960 days


#3 posted 01-26-2018 07:37 AM

Just getting into turning but a lot of people seem to like hot glue for a secure hold.
video

-- Andy - Seattle USA

View Nubsnstubs's profile

Nubsnstubs

1534 posts in 2087 days


#4 posted 01-26-2018 05:21 PM

Mike, a rim chuck is a very large wooden face plate that will fit into your chuck that has a groove turned to fit the rim of your pieces for tenon removal.
I use MDF and a hardwood block no thicker than 3/4” thick. It could be as large as 6×6 square. More glue surface that way. After you get the block glued on with Titebond glue, it doesn’t matter what number you use, turn a 3/8” long tenon to fit your chuck.
When the tenon is fitted, mount it in your chuck, measure you bowl ID and OD, turn a groove to match. It should fit snug. Do what you need to do, and when finished, put it aside like you would do with any tool. Use it in the future for any and all of your turnings.
Since I invented the Chuck Plate, I don’t use a tenon on my Rim Chucks. I also invented the Tail Stock Steady that allows me to remove the tenons safely while still between centers. go back to my website to see what I’m talking about. www.woodturnerstools.com ….......... Jerry (in Tucson)

-- Jerry (in Tucson) www.woodturnerstools.com

View walnutles's profile

walnutles

13 posts in 554 days


#5 posted 01-26-2018 06:20 PM

You can glue chuck it in many ways, I turn the tenons off like this. Les

View LesB's profile

LesB

2075 posts in 3800 days


#6 posted 01-26-2018 06:27 PM

If you have a chuck on your lathe you could create a mounting dado in the piece using a router with a circle template cut to the proper size for you chuck jaws in a piece of plywood and put a template guide on the base of your router. Find the center of your blank, clamp the template over it (I do this across the corner of my work bench) and route a recess (dado) 3/16” to 1/4” deep into the piece being turned. Now you can mount it on you chuck.

I do this with almost all my work. For bowls I make the first dado cut on the side that will be the inside of the bowl. I then turn the bottom completely and cut a new dado there so I can turn the piece around and complete the inside and the sides if I did not do them while working on the bottom. When making the dado in the bottom of the piece I usually cut a ring just wide and deep enough for the chuck jaws, leaving the center of it a bit high and cutting some beads as a decoration.

This method works great for turning green wood where you rough out the blank to remove most of the wood then let it dry before finishing. It is easy to remount it after it is dry.

Other people use the tenon method of chuck mounting but then they have to remove the tenon when they are through and have no way to remount the piece later. I just refinished aa 15 year old salad bowl by simply mounting it on the lathe with this dado method.

One more comment. I do not trust hot glue enough to use on the lathe work, especially for larger pieces.
One other way of mounting a blank is by gluing it to a piece of waste (plywood) screwed to a mounting plate and the best way I have found for this is to apply a layer of wood glue to the blank then add a layer of newspaper or even better brown paper bag. Put another coat of glue on the paper and then (after finding the center) put the mounting blank on and clamp until it drys Then turn that side of the work. When your are done turning (it will look like Walnutles picture above) you can separate the work from the mounting piece very easily with a chisel. The paper pulls apart quite easily this way and then you can finish the work on the other side.

-- Les B, Oregon

View walnutles's profile

walnutles

13 posts in 554 days


#7 posted 01-26-2018 07:02 PM

I put a board up to the bowl keeping it in place with the tailstock then I use the hot melt gun to put a line of glue around the bowl. Remember to leave a gap and a tail end of glue that you can put your skew under and pull up to remove the glue.
I then cut a tennon in the board and remount the board in my chuck and turn the tennon off, i have just done this on a 20” fruit bowl.
You can also do this when remounting or returning bowls, but be carefull as a bad catch with a tool or an out of ballanced bowl can fly off if the glue fails so use the tailstock when you can. Les

View Karda's profile

Karda

1482 posts in 911 days


#8 posted 01-26-2018 08:38 PM

thanks for all your suggestions, I have a rim chuck of sorts. is 2 layers of 3/4 ply glued together. I make a recess for the rim then tape it down with strapping tape, per Capt. Eddie, it works. I never true glue how do you break the glue when done. Is there a special hot glue for this work or can you use the general craft store hot glue.
Also when you put the rim on the flat board when it is on the lathe to center thanks Mike

View walnutles's profile

walnutles

13 posts in 554 days


#9 posted 01-27-2018 06:07 PM

no special hot melt glue, I find that if you leave a small gap and a trail of glue leading away from your work you can prise the glue up with a skew and then just pull the glue off.
If the glue snaps or refuses to come off you might have to use your parting tool to cut away most of the glue to remove your bowl.

I will say that MDF is not the best thing to cut a recess in for your chuck as the MDF can fall apart so the way that you have been doing it with tape is good. Les

View Karda's profile

Karda

1482 posts in 911 days


#10 posted 02-03-2018 10:53 PM

sorry missed the last post, thanks for all of your suggestion, I sent away for a 100 watt glue gun. There are some thing tape won’t work for. I am always looking for other options I know I can find them here thanks Mike

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