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View jtrz's profile

Sharpening stone honing oil advice

by jtrz
posted 01-25-2018 09:47 PM


24 replies so far

View Andre's profile

Andre

2829 posts in 2344 days


#1 posted 01-25-2018 10:29 PM

3 in 1 works just fine, I did try some Norton, seems a little thinner?

-- Lifting one end of the plank.

View jtrz's profile

jtrz

166 posts in 1712 days


#2 posted 01-25-2018 10:38 PM

I’ve read that 3 in 1 in time will clog up the stone. I think they said because of its thickness.

I’ve read that mineral oil works really well. Some people mix it 50/50 with kerosene or I think mineral spirits.

I am new to oil stones so bear with me but what is best practice after you are finished sharpening? Wipe the stone off? Rinse it off?

Thanks for the reply

-- Jeff | Louisville, Ky

View Woodknack's profile

Woodknack

12927 posts in 2918 days


#3 posted 01-26-2018 01:30 AM

3N1 is lightweight machine oil, about 17W, IIRC. Be fine. I use combination of motor oil and kerosene as an all purpose lubricant.

-- Rick M, http://thewoodknack.blogspot.com/

View mel52's profile

mel52

1068 posts in 803 days


#4 posted 01-26-2018 01:54 AM

Anything that floats the metal residue of your sharpened edge off the stone should work. I have been using the oil that I put in my air tools. For some reason I have extra bottles of it and it seems to work good. When finished I put a little extra on the stone, rub it around with my finger and then wipe it off.

-- MEL, Kansas

View jtrz's profile

jtrz

166 posts in 1712 days


#5 posted 01-26-2018 01:58 AM

I guess I’ll just have to test them all out and see what works best for me. I actually have some of that oil for air compressors. I’ll sharpen a chisel or two tonight and let you all know how it turns out

Thanks

-- Jeff | Louisville, Ky

View MagicalMichael's profile

MagicalMichael

153 posts in 1055 days


#6 posted 01-26-2018 02:09 AM

As far as i can tell the only thing to avoid is something thick. I have tried hi end honing oil and also used very inexpensive lamp oil and haven’t been able to tell any difference.

Michael

-- michael

View Planeman40's profile

Planeman40

1453 posts in 3299 days


#7 posted 01-26-2018 02:58 AM

I’ve been using 3 in 1 oil for years with my Arkansas stones for years with no problem. I view the “3 in 1 oil clogs up the stone” an old wife’s tale.

-- Always remember: It is a mathematical certainty that half the people in this country are below average in intelligence!

View jtrz's profile

jtrz

166 posts in 1712 days


#8 posted 01-26-2018 03:53 AM

Planeman40
Do you mix the 3 in 1 with kerosene as well.

Is the point of mixing the 3 in 1 to dilute or thin it out or does kerosene have some chemical properties or something that make the solution more effective?

I don’t have any kerosene right now, is there anything else I can use in it’s place?
Is mixing the the oil with something else absolutely necessary?

Also, I noticed that the wood base the stone is glued to is unfinished and is already getting dirty. After I actually start using these stones the bases are going to be filthy. Am I crazy in thinking about putting some protective finish on them so they don’t get soaked with oil and tiny metal particles?

-- Jeff | Louisville, Ky

View Planeman40's profile

Planeman40

1453 posts in 3299 days


#9 posted 01-26-2018 04:13 AM

I can’t comment on the mixing with kerosene as I never do it . I just use 3 in 1 oil as it is. I have a number of Arkansas stones with one about a foot long that cost me around $80. I am a real fan of them and prefer them for my final sharpening before proceeding with stropping. I use other coarse stones prior to the Arkansas for shaping and coarse sharpening. As to the glued down stones, I try to avoid them for just the reason you mention. If the idea of a dirty oil soaked wood base bothers you, then by all means apply some varnish on them. However the dirty wood bases don’t hurt anything. As a side note, I have moved sway from water stones as they are very messy and their softness allows wear to destroy their shape. But they do sharpen well.

-- Always remember: It is a mathematical certainty that half the people in this country are below average in intelligence!

View OSU55's profile

OSU55

2441 posts in 2528 days


#10 posted 01-26-2018 01:08 PM

Used lamp oil for many years

View Andre's profile

Andre

2829 posts in 2344 days


#11 posted 01-26-2018 01:45 PM

Oil stones can be washed out with warm soapy water and plastic brush, flushed well then re-oiled after they dry. Some people spray them down with WD-40 or rinse in kerosene? Same as a water stone they will need to be flattened at some time in there life, sooner if you sharpen a lot of narrow chisels and form groves.

-- Lifting one end of the plank.

View Woodknack's profile

Woodknack

12927 posts in 2918 days


#12 posted 01-26-2018 06:30 PM

Before you get analysis paralysis, just grab some 3n1 and go for it.

-- Rick M, http://thewoodknack.blogspot.com/

View jopo's profile

jopo

45 posts in 1774 days


#13 posted 01-26-2018 06:48 PM



Before you get analysis paralysis, just grab some 3n1 and go for it.

- Rick_M


Analysis paralysis…I love that so much.

View bbasiaga's profile

bbasiaga

1243 posts in 2533 days


#14 posted 01-26-2018 08:08 PM

Hoppes gun oil, just the plain oil not the cleaning solvent, is pretty darn good as well. You can find it at a lot of sporting goods places like Bass Pro, Cabelas, Dicks, if you are not keen to go to a shooting store.

Brian

-- Part of engineering is to know when to put your calculator down and pick up your tools.

View Woodknack's profile

Woodknack

12927 posts in 2918 days


#15 posted 01-26-2018 08:37 PM

I read someone the other day talking about the difference between pre-internet and post internet woodworking. Pre-internet we would read a book and do that, or ask someone knowledgable and do that. Now we ask a hundred random people and get 50 different answers and can’t decide between them.

-- Rick M, http://thewoodknack.blogspot.com/

View Don W's profile

Don W

19368 posts in 3106 days


#16 posted 01-26-2018 10:13 PM

I use 50/50 mix of diesel and mineral oil.

-- http://timetestedtools.net - Collecting is an investment in the past, and the future.

View Gene Howe's profile (online now)

Gene Howe

11870 posts in 3967 days


#17 posted 01-26-2018 10:22 PM

Windex works just fine. On stone or diamond.

-- Gene 'The true soldier fights not because he hates what is in front of him, but because he loves what is behind him.' G. K. Chesterton

View jtrz's profile

jtrz

166 posts in 1712 days


#18 posted 01-26-2018 11:26 PM


Before you get analysis paralysis, just grab some 3n1 and go for it.

- Rick_M


I went ahead and used some 3 in 1. Seemed to work fine.

My stones are only 2” wide (couldn’t afford the 3” ones) but I was hoping to sharpen some of the irons from some planes I’m restoring. The block planes won’t be a problem but I have a no 5 bailey and a miller falls smoothing plane and their irons are over 2”. Is it a bad idea to try and do the final sharpening on a 2” stone?

I was also thinking about running the soles of my planes on the finer arkansas stones to polish them up a bit. I’m doing the actual flattening with sandpaper on a granite tile (works great BTW) but my finest sandpaper is 320 and I would like to go a bit finer. Again, bad idea?

-- Jeff | Louisville, Ky

View bandit571's profile

bandit571

23965 posts in 3222 days


#19 posted 01-26-2018 11:45 PM

iron too wide? Be like C. Schwarz, and do a figure 8 fro the side of the stone….

-- A Planer? I'M the planer, this is what I use

View mel52's profile

mel52

1068 posts in 803 days


#20 posted 01-26-2018 11:47 PM

I get wet/dry sandpaper at home depot or other places in a lot finer grits. I think I have some as high as 1000.

-- MEL, Kansas

View bbasiaga's profile

bbasiaga

1243 posts in 2533 days


#21 posted 01-27-2018 12:50 AM

I think 320 is fine for your plane sole. You can polish it up more, but it would just be for looks. Some argue the smoother it is, the more drag it has. I’m not sure if it works that way in practicality. EIther way, it will not affect the finish of your final surface.

Brian

-- Part of engineering is to know when to put your calculator down and pick up your tools.

View knockknock's profile

knockknock

473 posts in 2711 days


#22 posted 01-27-2018 01:03 AM

- Nothing magical about kerosene, it is thin and inexpensive, downside is it is volatile and irritates the skin of some people.

- 220 grit sandpaper for the sole of a plane is good enough, you can polish the sole higher, but it will get scratched in use anyway.

- 2 inch wide stones, sharpen free-hand, do the figure 8 like bandit suggested, or cock the blade 45 degrees when sharpening so the whole edge is on the stone (more stable this way with wide blades than straight across anyway).

-- 👀 --

View Woodknack's profile

Woodknack

12927 posts in 2918 days


#23 posted 01-27-2018 01:58 AM

I have never gone beyond 120 for a plane sole, not sure if it makes any difference. I spray tack the sandpaper to my tablesaw.

-- Rick M, http://thewoodknack.blogspot.com/

View Andre's profile

Andre

2829 posts in 2344 days


#24 posted 01-27-2018 06:40 PM

I have a roll of self adhesive 180 and 220 from auto body shop supplies stuck on jointer table or a granite slab.
Found the 220 works better on my wood planes to keep them flat. Too smooth and you will create suction problems!
A little wax on the soles and away you go!

-- Lifting one end of the plank.

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