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Need help indentifying pallet wood I have

by Namewasdallas
posted 01-24-2018 05:36 PM


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View TheFridge's profile

TheFridge

10859 posts in 2027 days


#1 posted 01-24-2018 06:09 PM

Alder. 100%.

-- Shooting down the walls of heartache. Bang bang. I am. The warrior.

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Mike54Ohio

181 posts in 1019 days


#2 posted 01-24-2018 06:13 PM



Alder. 100%.

- TheFridge

LOL @ Fridge (the man the myth the legend)

-- It's only a dumb question if you ignore the correct answer

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ArtMann

1441 posts in 1357 days


#3 posted 01-24-2018 06:22 PM

That joke is so old it has dementia. It has been confusing to some people who aren’t in on the joke. I just want to advise the OP to ignore the previous two responses.

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BandsawJeff

52 posts in 741 days


#4 posted 01-24-2018 07:06 PM

Do you have a picture? You can tell if its red or white oak by looking at the end grain.

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Namewasdallas

26 posts in 665 days


#5 posted 01-24-2018 07:10 PM

Yeah I’ll take some pictures of what I have when I get home from work. I would like to make a small junk basket style thing with some of the oak and use my porter cable dovetail jig to do some through dovetails. Like I said I’m new to wood working it all started when I got a free old craftsman 1hp router and picked up a cheap craftsman 12” dovetail jig. Then came the desalt dwe7491rs table saw, upgraded Freud blade and bunch of other wood working tools. I really can’t justify spending the money on nice lumber till I really get it dialed in, as it’s not like welding we’re I can chop it off and grind it out.

View Aj2's profile

Aj2

2533 posts in 2338 days


#6 posted 01-24-2018 07:27 PM

It’s been mentioned here many times. Pallet wood is not always good for us to use not only is it low grade wood its often dirty and sometimes treated with insecticides. Why make your hobby harder and risk poisening yourself with foul dust.
There’s still no free lunch :(

-- Aj

View Ripper70's profile

Ripper70

1343 posts in 1449 days


#7 posted 01-24-2018 07:32 PM



It s been mentioned here many times. Pallet wood is not always good for us to use not only is it low grade wood it often dirty and sometimes treated with insecticides. Why make your hobby harder and risk poisening yourself with foul dust.
There s still no free lunch :(

- Aj2


AJ is correct on this. However, there are ways to determine pallet wood origins and if they’ve been treated chemically. Here is one example:

How To Tell If A Wood Pallet Is Safe For Reuse?

-- "You know, I'm such a great driver, it's incomprehensible that they took my license away." --Vince Ricardo

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LesB

2221 posts in 3984 days


#8 posted 01-24-2018 07:32 PM

I have trouble thinking the palettes are Alder, which is relatively soft, not particularly strong, and not particularly red in color, most milled in the Pacific Northwest….we have lots of it in Oregon. One clue could be where the palettes are being shipped from because they are usually made from the least expensive local wood. So if it Asia they are probably a low grade asian hard wood (I use to get Japanese motorcycle shipping crates that were low grade mahogany).
Pictures will help, show both flat grain and end grain.

Finally I find it is not the expense of the wood I use but my “precious” time in building the project that I value the most. Inexpensive wood does not make a good project better.

-- Les B, Oregon

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bondogaposis

5558 posts in 2892 days


#9 posted 01-24-2018 07:46 PM



Alder. 100%.

- TheFridge


Based on the pictures, I can’t say he is wrong.

-- Bondo Gaposis

View ArtMann's profile

ArtMann

1441 posts in 1357 days


#10 posted 01-25-2018 12:58 AM

In spite of the impracticality of using pallet wood for anything serious, it is just intriguing to me to take something that is worthless and make something desirable with it. It is like the appeal of panning for gold on our farm. If you work hard at it all day, you can find a substantial number of flecks – maybe $5 worth. It isn’t the absolute value that is appealing. It is the challenge. At least that is what appeals to me.

View Namewasdallas's profile

Namewasdallas

26 posts in 665 days


#11 posted 01-25-2018 10:57 AM

I’m new to this forum so I’m not sure if I’m posting pictures correctly as I’m on a iPhone. The pallets are coming out of NC from our ink vendor there stamped US, HT

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Namewasdallas

26 posts in 665 days


#12 posted 01-25-2018 10:58 AM

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Namewasdallas

26 posts in 665 days


#13 posted 01-25-2018 10:58 AM

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Namewasdallas

26 posts in 665 days


#14 posted 01-25-2018 10:59 AM

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Namewasdallas

26 posts in 665 days


#15 posted 01-25-2018 10:59 AM

This is the pallet runner that’s most different from the others it’s reddish in color and planes really nice but still seem heavy like oak

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Namewasdallas

26 posts in 665 days


#16 posted 01-25-2018 11:01 AM

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Namewasdallas

26 posts in 665 days


#17 posted 01-25-2018 11:01 AM

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Namewasdallas

26 posts in 665 days


#18 posted 01-25-2018 11:03 AM

Like I said I’m only using pallets to hone my skills,I’ve been doing this for maybe 3 months now. Here’s the step stool I made

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Namewasdallas

26 posts in 665 days


#19 posted 01-25-2018 11:04 AM

Made the step stool with a old 1hp craftsman router and dovetail jig,then I upgraded to the Bosch 2.25hp router fixed base and portercable dovetail jig which they both work better

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Namewasdallas

26 posts in 665 days


#20 posted 01-25-2018 11:08 AM

Here’s a link the book self I’m going to build but the shelf’s are going to have the boards going in a different direction as I have a bunch that are smaller already hand planed and sanded

https://www.google.com/search?q=pallet+bookshelf&rlz=1CDGOYI_enUS771US771&hl=en-US&prmd=isvn&source=lnms&tbm=isch&sa=X&ved=0ahUKEwiTwtKX_PLYAhXB44MKHRcgDEAQ_AUIESgB&biw=414&bih=660&dpr=3#imgrc=s_dgplfFMhe3gM:

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kaerlighedsbamsen

1309 posts in 2254 days


#21 posted 01-25-2018 11:39 AM

Picture 1: Oak
2: Not sure, image is out of focus. Could perhaps be ash
3: Oak
4: Could be anything, out of focus
5: Oak
6: Oak
Others might have wiser words to say regarding species. It seems you have got some fairly ok quality timber there.

When photographing wood for identification make sure to do:
- One image of the whole board
- A close up of grain
- A close up of end gran
This makes helping a lot easyer

Good luck!

-- "Do or Do not. There is no try." - Yoda

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WDHLT15

1819 posts in 3017 days


#22 posted 01-25-2018 12:56 PM

Oak
Hickory
Oak
Cherry
Oak
Oak.

-- Danny Located in Perry, GA. Forester. Wood-Mizer LT40HD35 Sawmill. Nyle L53 Dehumidification Kiln. hamsleyhardwood.com

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Tennessee

2901 posts in 3055 days


#23 posted 01-25-2018 01:31 PM

Danny looks to be the most accurate.

My problems with pallets is that any pallet made out of the US must be treated with insecticide to make sure we don’t import bugs from overseas.
I know these are from your ink supplier in New York, but were the pallets cut and built in New York? Something to think about. Sometimes they use pallets from an overseas supplier of a component they use in the final product.

Personally, I just don’t use them at all – too messy and risky.

To me, this falls under the same category as making lamps and selling them without final UL approval. You can get away with it, but if anything happens, you are the source and therefore liable.

-- Tsunami Guitars and Custom Woodworking, Cleveland, TN

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Namewasdallas

26 posts in 665 days


#24 posted 01-25-2018 02:27 PM

I thought I had listed I work in NY and our ink vendor is located out of NC there all stamped US and Heat treated. I’ve only seen a couple pallets that haven’t been heat treated and they come in with material to print labels from small vendors. We get in a average of 50 pallets a day for material off the trucks and Fasson who makes the material always uses US pallets that are Heat treated.

I deff can tell the oak pallets and the one I was thinking was hickory as well and I was almost positive that one is cherry. Most of the runners have a notch cut into them so I’m jointing the one edge flat and tossing them on the table saw to rip off the notch in them to be left with something like a 2×4. Which I will use to build the structure of the book case. I decided to take a couple oak runners with the notch to use as th feet of the shelf to give it a better look. I’ll keep you guys posted once I get everything hand planed and sanded then I’ll start cutting and putting it together.

I would have liked to use my Freud dado blade set to make the shelf’s but this wood isn’t all the same size.

I will get to use the dado blade set on this jewelry box I’m half way done with. Made it out of pine and did half blind dovetails on all 4 corners then cut a dado slot for the bottom of the box and used some what I think is birch veneered plywood from dresser drawers I had taken apart and saved. I just need to come up with a design for the top to the box I have some crown molding i ripped down and was thinking off tossing it on the miter saw t

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Namewasdallas

26 posts in 665 days


#25 posted 01-25-2018 02:28 PM

And making basically a picture frame top with a dado slot for some 1/8 veneered plywood

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tomsteve

976 posts in 1760 days


#26 posted 01-25-2018 04:38 PM



Alder. 100%.

- TheFridge

iwas thinkin clear alder until i saw the pictures

View Andybb's profile

Andybb

2168 posts in 1144 days


#27 posted 01-25-2018 04:50 PM

That is some of the nicest pallet wood I’ve seen. As long as you’re comfortable with the origin etc. you’re right. Great stuff to practice on and even use for some projects. Free is good! :-)


I’m new to this forum so I’m not sure if I’m posting pictures correctly as I’m on a iPhone. The pallets are coming out of NC from our ink vendor there stamped US, HT
- Namewasdallas

If you are using an iPhone you need to hold the phone horizontally and they should post correctly. Also, looking at the times of your posts, rather than making repeated new posts you have an hour to edit and add on to the posts you make.


That joke is so old it has dementia. It has been confusing to some people who aren t in on the joke. I just want to advise the OP to ignore the previous two responses.

- ArtMann


Oh! Now I get it. I asked about identifying some wood a few months back and TheFridge immediately responded “Alder 100%” and I’m thinking, OK! Well it wasn’t alder and I’m thinking, “But he was soooo sure right off the bat”. Shame on you for abusing us noobs. :-) But it is funny.

From the link mentioned above…Good info

-- Andy - Seattle USA

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alittleoff

541 posts in 1817 days


#28 posted 01-25-2018 05:50 PM

Oak
Sasafrass
Oak
Birch maybe
Oak
Oak.
I really don’t know.
Gerald

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diverlloyd

3684 posts in 2398 days


#29 posted 01-25-2018 06:58 PM

Oak on most.

It’s about time you guys get a new “joke”(it should be funny to be called a joke which it isn’t). It’s a shame that new people come on here asking for help and they have to deal with answers that others think are funny you guys are pretty sad period. Way to help out people new to the community.

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AlaskaGuy

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#30 posted 01-25-2018 07:13 PM

If you find something other than Alder I wouldn’t use it.

-- Alaskan's for Global warming!

View Aj2's profile

Aj2

2533 posts in 2338 days


#31 posted 01-25-2018 07:27 PM

You know what’s wierd some people” non woodworkers “actually think wood only comes in one color. You get what you deserve if you take anything serious on the Internet.
I remember when alder was called poor mans cherry.

-- Aj

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MT_Stringer

3183 posts in 3772 days


#32 posted 01-25-2018 07:34 PM

Some of the ones I have broken down had oak and poplar along with some other soft stuff. The pallets came from behind one of those dollar stores so imported from no telling where. No stains. Clean wood – most likely one time use only.

And I made this guy for a benefit auction. It sold for $125 so I was happy.

-- Handcrafted by Mike Henderson - Channelview, Texas

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jerkylips

495 posts in 3111 days


#33 posted 01-25-2018 07:35 PM



That joke is so old it has dementia. It has been confusing to some people who aren t in on the joke. I just want to advise the OP to ignore the previous two responses.

- ArtMann

some things get better with age, like wine…or milk.

View Namewasdallas's profile

Namewasdallas

26 posts in 665 days


#34 posted 01-26-2018 02:20 PM

I don’t get the joke but I’m sure in due time I will if I hang around you folks long enough. I’m debating if I should go to my local antique store and buy another vintage jack plane as the brand new old stock great neck I bought on eBay broke twice now the frog is garbage. Or if I should go buy a dewalt eletric hand plane. I would like a bench top jointer like the porter cable or a delta but the ones that are for sale are priced to high, the guy I work with has a older cast iron craftsman 6” jointer but I really don’t have the room for a belt drive setup.

The great neck plane is a POS the first thing that broke was the yoke pins being cast as one part instead of drilled with a cross bar. So I took it to work and drilled a hole and cut up a 1/8 drill bit as the cross bar which worked fine till the spot in the frog where the cross bar goes broke. Cheap pot metal was used.

The antique store has about 100 hand planes from wooden to cast iron ones it’s just finding one that the handles and blades are in good shape and useable. There somewhat expensive from 50-100 when I could snag a dewalt or portercable eletric planer for roughly the same price

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fuigb

564 posts in 3498 days


#35 posted 01-26-2018 10:33 PM

A down side to pallet wood is the likelihood that it has not been properly dried. When I found a source for hardwood pallets I made a kiln and am now rolling in more lumber than I can use in several years. No reason to apologize for using found wood.

-- - Crud. Go tell your mother that I need a Band-aid.

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Namewasdallas

26 posts in 665 days


#36 posted 01-27-2018 03:50 AM

Got off jury duty today it was a 6+ week trial and it was only paying 40 bucks a day, so the minute I left I rushed over to the antique store and looked at all the hand planes they had a nice wooden Stanley plane for 40 bucks maybe 14-20” but I’m to nervous to spend money on one, so I picked up this really good shape stainley Bailey no.5 for 52$ out the door

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Namewasdallas

26 posts in 665 days


#37 posted 01-27-2018 03:51 AM

So I have 3 Stanley planes now I got the block plane from the dude I work with as a gift it was his grandfathers and bought the #4-5 from the antique store I have to say I love the -#5 it cuts like a beast and you can muscle through some shit with it

All I had to do was sharpen the blade most of the other planes they had the blades were torn up or the handles shit this was the best of the bunch they had a few 18+ inch planes but I didn’t see the need for one that large yet

View TheFridge's profile

TheFridge

10859 posts in 2027 days


#38 posted 01-27-2018 08:16 AM

They work great with alder.

-- Shooting down the walls of heartache. Bang bang. I am. The warrior.

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Namewasdallas

26 posts in 665 days


#39 posted 02-22-2018 05:25 PM

So it’s been a minute but I’ve been hand planing these slats and it got old so I found me a ridgid 6” jointer for 325 bucks the other day mint shape from a nice guy with a beautiful wood shop. So now I can edge joint all these and face joint both sides. I’ll take some pictures of this one pallet I think is poplar

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Namewasdallas

26 posts in 665 days


#40 posted 02-22-2018 05:26 PM

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Namewasdallas

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#41 posted 02-22-2018 05:27 PM

Just made a dust collector out of a 5 gallon bucket for my shop vac which works great as my shop bag was filling the bag to fast being a small 4 gallon ridgid

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JollyGreen67

1676 posts in 3303 days


#42 posted 02-22-2018 05:36 PM

Hope you are wearing an appropriate hazmat suit and respirator while creating all that saw dust anti-insect infused lumber ! :o(

-- When I was a kid I wanted to be older . . . . . this CRAP is not what I expected ! RIP 09/08/2018

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Smitty_Cabinetshop

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#43 posted 02-22-2018 06:10 PM

1) Yes, the Alder line has been a thing for some time now
2) It’s funny
3) Palette wood is anathema to some of you
4) It’s not funny that some palettes may be contaminated / harmful
5) The warnings (unlike the alder line) have been beaten to death

-- Don't anthropomorphize your handplanes. They hate it when you do that. -- OldTools Archive --

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JollyGreen67

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#44 posted 02-22-2018 10:10 PM

Maybe the warnings that have been beating to death will prevent a real death.

-- When I was a kid I wanted to be older . . . . . this CRAP is not what I expected ! RIP 09/08/2018

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MT_Stringer

3183 posts in 3772 days


#45 posted 02-23-2018 12:40 AM

A magnet will help your knives live a little longer. Good luck.

-- Handcrafted by Mike Henderson - Channelview, Texas

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Smitty_Cabinetshop

16239 posts in 3159 days


#46 posted 02-23-2018 12:46 AM

Jimbo, nothing prevents death. It’s one per customer, every time. Maybe lighten up a bit?

-- Don't anthropomorphize your handplanes. They hate it when you do that. -- OldTools Archive --

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bandit571

23976 posts in 3224 days


#47 posted 02-23-2018 02:25 AM

I didn’t know Heat Treated wood involved any Chemicals….....worked with pallet wood for a LONG time. Back then, it was the best way to get hardwood…..

The Amish around here saw their own logs, build their pallets, and ship then by the semi-trailer flatbed to all the factories in the area…...I did not see any kilns, no any barrels of “bugspray”...

-- A Planer? I'M the planer, this is what I use

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JollyGreen67

1676 posts in 3303 days


#48 posted 02-23-2018 09:48 PM

Smitty – I was jus remarking about the possibility of a demise while using pallet wood – do you know what’s in it – I don’t either.

Besides, I’m waiting for my Agent Orange Infused prostate cancer to send me down the short path that 12 of us were sprayed with out on the Laotian Frontier, of which 8 have already went down that path. Death to me is nothing but an end to a means.

-- When I was a kid I wanted to be older . . . . . this CRAP is not what I expected ! RIP 09/08/2018

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JollyGreen67

1676 posts in 3303 days


#49 posted 02-23-2018 09:50 PM

bandit571 – The Amish don’t use chemicals, only natural ingredients. What ever happens after they ship it off is the responsibility of the pallet company.

-- When I was a kid I wanted to be older . . . . . this CRAP is not what I expected ! RIP 09/08/2018

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fuigb

564 posts in 3498 days


#50 posted 02-23-2018 10:49 PM

Getting deep around here…

Rock on with the pallet wood, op: no need to fear if you’ve done your homework.

-- - Crud. Go tell your mother that I need a Band-aid.

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