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View MrRon's profile

Non-carbide saw blades

by MrRon
posted 01-22-2018 06:32 PM


12 replies so far

View LesB's profile

LesB

2221 posts in 3982 days


#1 posted 01-22-2018 06:50 PM

I too have a collection of blades. I keep telling myself I will save them to use if I have to cut some “dirty” wood. But, I never do. Maybe there is a metallurgist out there who knows the make up of the steel.

First of all I think even the thinest would be to thick to use as cabinet scrapers but it could work as a stiff paint scraper type.
I’m curious as to how you intend to cut them; especially without over heating them in the process and removing the temper.

-- Les B, Oregon

View MrRon's profile

MrRon

5770 posts in 3783 days


#2 posted 01-22-2018 07:04 PM



I too have a collection of blades. I keep telling myself I will save them to use if I have to cut some “dirty” wood. But, I never do. Maybe there is a metallurgist out there who knows the make up of the steel.

First of all I think even the thinest would be to thick to use as cabinet scrapers but it could work as a stiff paint scraper type.
I m curious as to how you intend to cut them; especially without over heating them in the process and removing the temper.

- LesB


My son who shares my shop, has a plasma cutter. If I knew the material, I would be able to heat treat if necessary. Maybe a cabinet scraper is not such a good idea. Any ideas what I could make from them?

View John Smith's profile

John Smith

2047 posts in 702 days


#3 posted 01-22-2018 07:05 PM

you can cut saw blades with a angle grinder with a “stainless” grade metal cut-off blade.
carving tools are the #2 choice with skinning/gutting sportsmen’s knives being #1.
lots of videos on the ole YouTube about repurposing circular saw blades .

-- I am a painter. That's what I do. I paint things --

View Dutchy's profile

Dutchy

3430 posts in 2708 days


#4 posted 01-22-2018 07:09 PM

Normally these blades are made from CV steel, Chrome Vanadium steel

-- https://dutchypatterns.com/

View Woodknack's profile

Woodknack

12927 posts in 2919 days


#5 posted 01-22-2018 07:10 PM

Should be high carbon steel if they are any quality, a spark test will verify.

-- Rick M, http://thewoodknack.blogspot.com/

View Carloz's profile

Carloz

1147 posts in 1131 days


#6 posted 01-22-2018 08:19 PM

What is “scraper blades” ?
Cabinet scrapers are much thinner so you could bend them a bit.
But there is a lot more you can do from non-carbide ( <—- this is important) saw blades. Carbide tipped blades probably use much softer steel for the body and are not suitable for anything.
1. Ninja Throwing Stars
2. Dowel cutting plate.
3. Pry bar/Paint scrapers.
4. Resharpen.
5. Wall watch face.
6. Riving knives.
7. Corrugated metal cutters.
8. Disk sander.
9. Frisbee that keeps players much more focused than a regular plastic frisbee disk.
...

View Woodknack's profile

Woodknack

12927 posts in 2919 days


#7 posted 01-22-2018 08:30 PM



. Carbide tipped blades probably use much softer steel…
- Carloz

Some do, some don’t, you have to test each one.

-- Rick M, http://thewoodknack.blogspot.com/

View John Smith's profile

John Smith

2047 posts in 702 days


#8 posted 01-22-2018 09:30 PM

Rick – that is a nice little test sheet to keep in the shop…....
I’ve never seen it before. thanks for sharing !!

-- I am a painter. That's what I do. I paint things --

View Ripper70's profile

Ripper70

1343 posts in 1448 days


#9 posted 01-22-2018 09:45 PM

Not sure if any of your blades would be suitable for these suggestions but it’s worth checking out.

-- "You know, I'm such a great driver, it's incomprehensible that they took my license away." --Vince Ricardo

View MrRon's profile

MrRon

5770 posts in 3783 days


#10 posted 01-23-2018 01:21 AM

Thanks all for the suggestions. I tend to procrastinate on implementing projects due to the multiple projects going on at any one time. Right now, that would be low on my priority list. When I’m doing a project, something always comes up to side track what I’m working on at the moment. The dangers of retirement. I need more time. Actually the saw blade thing came up as I was doing a project which was cleaning and organizing my shop. The saw blades which lay dormant for I don’t know how many years appeared while in the organizing process. I am presently going through withdrawal as I try to decide what to keep and what to send to the dump. For every 2 things I want to get rid of, one manages to survive to live another day. I am the ultimate hoarder. Anyone who saves scraps of wood knows what I mean. It has to be a disease. I realize it is not rational, but with guidance from my “organized” son, I will try to straighten myself out.

View Lazyman's profile

Lazyman

4088 posts in 1927 days


#11 posted 01-23-2018 03:25 AM

Walter Sorrells has a good spark testing video showing what the sparks actually look like here. Once you see this, the diagram Rick shared makes a lot more sense. After seeing this I went around testing every type of steel laying around in my shop, including a few of my cheaper tools.

If you are interested in knife making, there are tons of youtube videos where people use old saw blades for knives.

-- Nathan, TX -- Hire the lazy man. He may not do as much work but that's because he will find a better way.

View Woodknack's profile

Woodknack

12927 posts in 2919 days


#12 posted 01-23-2018 03:49 AM

Good video Nathan.

Another tip, try annealing and re-hardening the steel from the sawblade because sometimes they use alloy steels that are very difficult to anneal or harden without a kiln.

-- Rick M, http://thewoodknack.blogspot.com/

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