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New Incra I Box calibrations

by StoutSawdust
posted 01-22-2018 03:32 PM


17 replies so far

View Rich's profile (online now)

Rich

4396 posts in 949 days


#1 posted 01-22-2018 04:00 PM

Yep. I’ve commented on here many times that Incra makes great products, but they really oversell those KISS Calibration type concepts in their videos. I’ve yet to find anything of theirs that’s as easy to set up as they make it look. Your use of calipers is the right way to go.

-- Knowledge is not skill. Knowledge plus ten thousand times is skill. -- Shinichi Suzuki

View HorizontalMike's profile

HorizontalMike

7786 posts in 3273 days


#2 posted 01-22-2018 04:28 PM

I use the 1/4in setup bar when setting up my I-Box. Sure, a little fine adjustment will still be needed, but this will get you very close.
Buy a brass setup bar set, such as :
https://www.woodcraft.com/products/whiteside-5-piece-brass-set-up-gauges-4
or
https://www.rockler.com/precision-brass-setup-bars

-- HorizontalMike -- "Woodpeckers understand..."

View ScottM's profile

ScottM

726 posts in 2506 days


#3 posted 01-22-2018 04:33 PM

I’m really not sure how you got THAT far off. Send Incra an email and see what they may be able to suggest for “resetting” your adjustments. Those guys are great with product support.

View StoutSawdust's profile

StoutSawdust

12 posts in 484 days


#4 posted 01-22-2018 05:45 PM

Thanks guys, I will try to get a hold of Incra.

I’m definitely getting those setup gauges! Thanks for the link.

-- Success is the result of perfection, hard work, learning from failure, loyalty, and persistence.

View Rich's profile (online now)

Rich

4396 posts in 949 days


#5 posted 01-22-2018 06:01 PM

The problem with Incra’s method for setting it up is that there are two places where it’s very subjective. First, when you bring the jig’s fingers together you can’t tell absolutely when they are just touching, and there is a fraction of a turn of the red knob between what might be touching and when they are pressed together. Likewise, when you open them out to fit the kerf of your test cut, precisely how tight should they be? Again, there is a fraction of a turn of the red knob between a fit and a snug fit. All of that is enough to completely screw up the joint since turning the red knob also changes the distance from the fingers to the cutter — and the finger width on the board.

There are really only two factors involved since the kerf width is constant. One is the width of the jig’s fingers and how tight the boards fit over them, and the space from the outer finger face to the bit (I prefer using a router). I find that a good firm fit in the board kerfs is essential for consistency. If you can just drop the board onto them, there’s too much play. I like to set them so I have to push the board down onto it.

After that, the rest is easy. You can use your calipers to adjust the silver knob and get the perfect finger width and you’re done. I find I don’t even need to make a test cut. Before cutting expensive wood I do one on some scrap to be safe, but it’s always perfect.

The reason I like to use the router table is that when making the cuts, I only have to slide the jig a couple of inches for each pass.

Also, since I work almost exclusively with a 5/16” diameter bit, I don’t have to do any adjustments at all. Just drop the jig on the router table and cut away.

-- Knowledge is not skill. Knowledge plus ten thousand times is skill. -- Shinichi Suzuki

View newwoodbutcher's profile

newwoodbutcher

794 posts in 3209 days


#6 posted 01-22-2018 11:40 PM

I’ve been using the IBox jig with the Forrest 2-Piece flat bottom Finger Joint Set of blades for a few years now. I do a fair amount of finger joints I’m my projects. I set up the IBox jig when I first got it with the Kiss procedure and my Forrest finger joint blades stacked at 1/4”. I always make a test piece but haven’t Re-adjusted the jig since the first time and my finger joints are near perfect every time.

-- Ken

View StoutSawdust's profile

StoutSawdust

12 posts in 484 days


#7 posted 01-23-2018 01:06 AM

Since I’m still in the return window I’m going to exchange it. If the second one has the same micro adjust after the fact issue I will just live with it and call Incra.

Still getting those brass bar sets though!

-- Success is the result of perfection, hard work, learning from failure, loyalty, and persistence.

View HorizontalMike's profile

HorizontalMike

7786 posts in 3273 days


#8 posted 01-23-2018 11:47 AM



Since I m still in the return window I m going to exchange it. If the second one has the same micro adjust after the fact issue I will just live with it and call Incra.

Still getting those brass bar sets though!

- StoutSawdust

IMO, hold off on returning it for an exchange. What you are showing/describing is NOT the fault of the jig, only an adjustment issue.

And as others have pointed out, use it on several pieces of scrap wood while tuning in on a perfect fit.

-- HorizontalMike -- "Woodpeckers understand..."

View Peteybadboy's profile

Peteybadboy

697 posts in 2309 days


#9 posted 01-23-2018 12:31 PM

I also use the ibox a lot. I use Freud box joint blades. I set it up once for 1/4 then again for 5/16? and have not touched it building several boxes. I must admit I ran back and forth watching the DVD to the table saw and back to get it right. I’m happy with it.

-- Petey

View Robert's profile

Robert

3368 posts in 1840 days


#10 posted 01-23-2018 03:01 PM

Everything is based on getting the space between the blade and register pin equal to the blade thickness.

The register pin spacing is something you learn by feel.

What I do is

1) make a couple cuts
2) re-adjust the pin so its pretty snug
3) adjust the space between pin and blade.

I also found you don’t need to make a whole side, just make a couple cuts and use a micrometer to measure the pin & dial it in to fit the kerf the way you want.

You’ll get it when you:

1) remember which way to turn the silver knob
2) remember to hold the red knob when you adjust the silver knob
3) REMEMBER TO LOOSEN THE *&^% SET SCREW

-- Everything is a prototype thats why its one of a kind!!

View ArtMann's profile

ArtMann

1365 posts in 1175 days


#11 posted 01-23-2018 03:11 PM

So. is there a consensus among owners and users that the jig works well? The advertised features of the thing make it appealing.

View HorizontalMike's profile

HorizontalMike

7786 posts in 3273 days


#12 posted 01-23-2018 03:28 PM



So. is there a consensus among owners and users that the jig works well? The advertised features of the thing make it appealing.
- ArtMann

YES, it does work well. It just takes a bit of practice learning how the “two” adjusting mechanisms-in-one works, locks, and how to hold one while adjusting the other.

-- HorizontalMike -- "Woodpeckers understand..."

View ScottM's profile

ScottM

726 posts in 2506 days


#13 posted 01-23-2018 03:54 PM


YES, it does work well. It just takes a bit of practice learning how the “two” adjusting mechanisms-in-one works, locks, and how to hold one while adjusting the other.

- HorizontalMike

And also using it often enough to remember!! That’s always my problem.

View Dan P's profile

Dan P

735 posts in 2251 days


#14 posted 01-23-2018 04:13 PM

Adding a second miter slot guide helps with accuracy.

-- Daniel P

View StoutSawdust's profile

StoutSawdust

12 posts in 484 days


#15 posted 01-23-2018 11:23 PM



So. is there a consensus among owners and users that the jig works well? The advertised features of the thing make it appealing.

- ArtMann

Yeah, it works well, I would still recommend it for sure. Still a smooth process for quick box joints, just not as smooth as the videos have you believe.

-- Success is the result of perfection, hard work, learning from failure, loyalty, and persistence.

View ArtMann's profile

ArtMann

1365 posts in 1175 days


#16 posted 01-24-2018 07:54 PM

Thanks guys for the advice! I am usually very good about adapting to and using new equipment that requires some subtle adjustment. I have a woodworking friend who received one as a gift but has never tried it. He prefers his Leigh jig that works on a router table. I think I can acquire it economically. Sorry to hijack the thread.

View StoutSawdust's profile

StoutSawdust

12 posts in 484 days


#17 posted 01-24-2018 09:26 PM



Thanks guys for the advice! I am usually very good about adapting to and using new equipment that requires some subtle adjustment. I have a woodworking friend who received one as a gift but has never tried it. He prefers his Leigh jig that works on a router table. I think I can acquire it economically. Sorry to hijack the thread.

- ArtMann


Well, hopefully he gives you a good deal! I decided to get the porter cable dovetail jig after my return but will pick up another one later.

-- Success is the result of perfection, hard work, learning from failure, loyalty, and persistence.

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