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All Replies on Update on Handy Drawer Clamp...Rust Question

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View BryanFaz's profile

Update on Handy Drawer Clamp...Rust Question

by BryanFaz
posted 01-22-2018 04:26 AM


11 replies so far

View MrUnix's profile

MrUnix

7361 posts in 2561 days


#1 posted 01-22-2018 05:08 AM

I would try wiping down the bare metal with a dilute phosphoric acid solution. Will convert any surface rust to a hard black coating (ferric phosphate) and help prevent future rust.

Cheers,
Brad

-- Brad in FL - In Dog I trust... everything else is questionable

View Walker's profile

Walker

158 posts in 835 days


#2 posted 01-22-2018 05:17 AM

I have no idea what that thing is, but I know I want one.

is that like a giant pipe clamp of sorts? If so how does it work, and why are there drawers? Another night I have to explain to my wife why I was up until 2am googling tools I can’t afford…

-- ~Walker

View BryanFaz's profile

BryanFaz

58 posts in 863 days


#3 posted 01-22-2018 05:40 AM

Not sure where to look for phosphoric acid solution (ha). Or how to work with it…carefully I’m sure. I wonder if the ferric phosphate coated would make the collar or housing that the clamping/moving end sits on tighter?. I’m sure its the wrong term, but the end opposite of the wheel moves…and 50-100 years ago this rascal was used as a furniture clamp. It has crushing strength. Anyway, the one end rides on these iron collars. Here is a picture of two of them, upside down. Someone can come up with the correct term:

I’m wondering if the coating would negatively impact how easy it glides? Might be worth a modest reduction if it reduced the rust.

Yes Walker…it basically is a large pipe clamp. It was sitting outside in my buddies farm…he acquired it roughly 10-15 years ago. He decided to restore it a few weeks ago and here it is. We added the drawers for functionality and looks.

View BryanFaz's profile

BryanFaz

58 posts in 863 days


#4 posted 01-22-2018 05:44 AM

Here’s a picture i found online of one…without the top, of course. The top of my friends clamp is removable when he needs to use the clamp…otherwise, it’s one heckuva shop table.

View BryanFaz's profile

BryanFaz

58 posts in 863 days


#5 posted 01-22-2018 05:48 AM

Brad, can you buy that phosphoric acid at a hardware store?

View MrUnix's profile

MrUnix

7361 posts in 2561 days


#6 posted 01-22-2018 05:53 AM

You can get it almost anywhere… hardware stores, tractor supply, any of the BORG’s… It’s about $15 for a gallon. Here is some Kleen-Strip stuff that you can get at home depot. I typically use that and dilute it 50/50 with distilled water. It’s not that harmful… same stuff in Coca-cola that you drink :)

Cheers,
Brad

-- Brad in FL - In Dog I trust... everything else is questionable

View BryanFaz's profile

BryanFaz

58 posts in 863 days


#7 posted 01-22-2018 05:56 AM

Well there ya go. Wonderful!! Sounds much worse. HA.

I will definitely give that a shot. Thanks a bunch!!!!!

View Woodknack's profile

Woodknack

12776 posts in 2742 days


#8 posted 01-22-2018 07:40 AM

Why is it rusting so aggressively despite being oiled? Is your shop really wet? Running a propane or natural gas heater? Condensation from being warm during the day and cold at night? Fresh concrete?

-- Rick M, http://thewoodknack.blogspot.com/

View jerryminer's profile

jerryminer

951 posts in 1804 days


#9 posted 01-22-2018 11:00 AM

The wood looks like Douglas Fir—which is prone to splintering.

-- Jerry, making sawdust professionally since 1976

View BryanFaz's profile

BryanFaz

58 posts in 863 days


#10 posted 01-22-2018 03:19 PM

Good question Rick_M. The shop is partially heated by a central air unit (heat pump) and it has an electric heater in the back room. the shop is roughly 15 years old. It has been quite cold…and we live in Western Kentucky, in the Ohio Valley. Pretty humid normally.

Douglas Fir? We thought it might be fir…but that was a guess. We certainly didn’t know what type of fir. Thanks jerryminer.

View bondogaposis's profile

bondogaposis

5370 posts in 2714 days


#11 posted 01-22-2018 03:25 PM

I’m guessing the wood is western red cedar, it is commonly used for cross ties on electric poles.

-- Bondo Gaposis

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