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View el_mustango's profile

table saw kickback cause by the saw?

by el_mustango
posted 01-21-2018 06:49 PM


1 2 next »
71 replies

71 replies so far

View John Smith's profile

John Smith

2044 posts in 696 days


#1 posted 01-21-2018 06:56 PM

watching this one through “my good eye”

-- I am a painter. That's what I do. I paint things --

View Woodknack's profile

Woodknack

12924 posts in 2913 days


#2 posted 01-21-2018 07:06 PM

Kickback is user error and usually from using improperly dried wood or wet wood. Definitely tune up the saw and then learn basic safety rules and follow them. If using questionable wood, only cut halfway, by setting blade to half the Thickness, through on the first rip and see if the kerf closes.

https://www.tru.ca/hsafety/workinglearningsafely/work/tablesaw.html

-- Rick M, http://thewoodknack.blogspot.com/

View Bill White's profile

Bill White

5228 posts in 4494 days


#3 posted 01-21-2018 07:07 PM

Sounds as if ya need to do a bit of realignment. Blade should be even with the slot and fence. Some even “relieve” the trailing edge of the fence a bit (few thou.) to allow clearance.
This adjustment and the splitter will help big time.
Just my thoughts.
Bill

-- [email protected]

View Redoak49's profile

Redoak49

4226 posts in 2522 days


#4 posted 01-21-2018 07:09 PM

It is partially user error. Do not stand in back of the saw where a kicked back piece can get you. Stand to the side.

You need to find someone close to you than can give you some lessons before you kill yourself.

View WhyMe's profile

WhyMe

1182 posts in 2094 days


#5 posted 01-21-2018 07:12 PM

Since your measurement is from the outside miter slot away from the fence it indicates the blade is tighter to the fence on the rear than the front which will cause kickback. I assume your fence is in alignment with the right miter slot? It is better to take the measurements from the miter slot on the fence side.

View MrUnix's profile

MrUnix

7498 posts in 2732 days


#6 posted 01-21-2018 07:12 PM

If the fence is closer to the blade at the rear, you will get kick-back as it’s pinching the wood between the two. Your new used saw should be given a complete once over before using – clean, lube, align, etc… that will also give you a chance to examine the machine for any consumables that may need replacing like belts or bearings.

Cheers,
Brad

-- Brad in FL - In Dog I trust... everything else is questionable

View Aj2's profile

Aj2

2527 posts in 2331 days


#7 posted 01-21-2018 07:27 PM

Boards that are warped or twisted are more likely to give you trouble. I read in your post what the condition of the wood is milled flat and straight ? I do believe that a table should be in proper alinement but mostly for clean cutting and longer blade life.
I rip all rough wood on a bandsaw or anything that hasn’t been milled flat by me.

-- Aj

View AlaskaGuy's profile

AlaskaGuy

5414 posts in 2842 days


#8 posted 01-21-2018 07:29 PM

https://youtu.be/0WhnZS1p5Qg?t=110

-- Alaskan's for Global warming!

View 000's profile

000

2859 posts in 1432 days


#9 posted 01-21-2018 08:06 PM

I’ve never been a fan of standing in a certain place.

More of a fan of learning how to not have a kickback in the first place.

Of course your fence needs to be set up properly, I keep mine equal distance.
The next thing to learn is not to let go of your piece until you have gone past the blade.
If you push it all the way through how can you have kick back?

You can’t run a warped, crooked piece without the chance of trouble, so you have to learn when a piece can be a problem or not, before you cut it.

View Carloz's profile

Carloz

1147 posts in 1125 days


#10 posted 01-21-2018 08:07 PM

0.74mm is 15 times worse than acceptable. I am surprised you got only two kickbacks.
If you keep the workpiece pressed against the fence as you should, there is 0.74mm of wood at the back that overlap with the blade. It has more than enough support to grab the piece and raise it from the table.
However realigning the saw is very easy whether it has table mounted or cabinet mounted trunnions. You should have done it first thing after you bought the saw.

View Dr_T's profile

Dr_T

49 posts in 2325 days


#11 posted 01-21-2018 08:17 PM

el mustango,
Couple other things to think about and measure in addition to what has already been mentioned above:
1. Using the same setup, measure to the fence parallel to your blade front and back. Your blade can be aligned with the miter slot but not with the fence, which could contribute to the issues you are seeing.
2. Are you getting any play in the miter slot? If there is side-to-side travel of your runner in your miter slot, you may not be getting an accurate reading on your original measurement.

Hope you get your problem figured out, I know how disappointing it can be to get something and then figure out you can’t use it for some reason or another.

Dr T

View AlaskaGuy's profile

AlaskaGuy

5414 posts in 2842 days


#12 posted 01-21-2018 08:27 PM



I ve never been a fan of standing in a certain place.

More of a fan of learning how to not have a kickback in the first place.

Of course your fence needs to be set up properly, I keep mine equal distance.
The next thing to learn is not to let go of your piece until you have gone past the blade.
If you push it all the way through how can you have kick back?

You can t run a warped, crooked piece without the chance of trouble, so you have to learn when a piece can be a problem or not, before you cut it.

- jbay


Two things. You are a seasoned table saw user (not everyone is) 2, That’ like saying I don’t wear a seat belt because I drive safe.

Standing out of line of fire is just one layer of the whole process.

-- Alaskan's for Global warming!

View Ripper70's profile

Ripper70

1338 posts in 1442 days


#13 posted 01-21-2018 08:31 PM

I remember when you were shopping for this saw and said that you made several cuts on site and thought it performed beautifully. When you transported the saw home did you disassemble it and then reassemble when you got it home? Perhaps something got out of alignment?

It’s a Biesemeyer Fence, correct? If so, have a look at this video (if you haven’t discovered this already) on how to adjust the alignment of your fence.

-- "You know, I'm such a great driver, it's incomprehensible that they took my license away." --Vince Ricardo

View TheFridge's profile

TheFridge

10859 posts in 2019 days


#14 posted 01-21-2018 08:32 PM

Never assume everything is setup properly. Especially after transport.

-- Shooting down the walls of heartache. Bang bang. I am. The warrior.

View 000's profile

000

2859 posts in 1432 days


#15 posted 01-21-2018 09:39 PM

I ve never been a fan of standing in a certain place.

More of a fan of learning how to not have a kickback in the first place.

Of course your fence needs to be set up properly, I keep mine equal distance.
The next thing to learn is not to let go of your piece until you have gone past the blade.
If you push it all the way through how can you have kick back?

You can t run a warped, crooked piece without the chance of trouble, so you have to learn when a piece can be a problem or not, before you cut it.

- jbay

Two things. You are a seasoned table saw user (not everyone is) 2, That like saying I don t wear a seat belt because I drive safe.

Standing out of line of fire is just one layer of the whole process.

- AlaskaGuy


You can’t compare a table saw cut to driving a car.

Being a seasoned table saw user is why I’m trying to teach how not to have a kickback.
If you have flat true wood, saw is set up properly, push wood all the way past the blade and don’t let go of the wood, the chance of kickback should be nill.
There is no reason to concern yourself where to stand, except for the best position to make the cut properly.
Just my Opinion!

I know there are plenty of people more concerned with standing out of the way, waiting for the kickback.
If you have kickback on your mind you don’t have the confidence to start with, and probably will end up with a kickback. To each their own.

View JackDuren's profile

JackDuren

483 posts in 1493 days


#16 posted 01-21-2018 09:45 PM



Kickback is user error and usually from using improperly dried wood or wet wood. Definitely tune up the saw and then learn basic safety rules and follow them. If using questionable wood, only cut halfway, by setting blade to half the Thickness, through on the first rip and see if the kerf closes.

https://www.tru.ca/hsafety/workinglearningsafely/work/tablesaw.html

- Rick_M


It’s not always user error. Chit happens…

View 000's profile

000

2859 posts in 1432 days


#17 posted 01-21-2018 09:48 PM


It s not always user error. Chit happens…

- JackDuren

Disagree, It’s always user error. Give me an example of when it was the machines fault.

View AlaskaGuy's profile

AlaskaGuy

5414 posts in 2842 days


#18 posted 01-21-2018 09:58 PM

A perfect person who makes no errors. What a fairyland concept. I will stand out of the direct line of fire just in case.

-- Alaskan's for Global warming!

View Holbs's profile

Holbs

2249 posts in 2562 days


#19 posted 01-21-2018 10:33 PM

http://lumberjocks.com/topics/223177 my DIY table saw alignment tool

1.) measure and align saw blade to miter slot
2.) measure and align the same miter slot to fence
3.) for giggles, measure and align saw blade to fence

if all 3 are within acceptable parameters, it’s not a mechanical issue. If spooked out in fear of another kickback, try strips of plywood for a couple runs instead of hardwood/softwood as plywood is more stable

-- The Carpenter Bee is derived from the Ancient Greek word wood-cutter "xylokopos/ξυλοκὀπος"

View AZWoody's profile

AZWoody

1461 posts in 1757 days


#20 posted 01-21-2018 10:38 PM

Disagree, It s always user error. Give me an example of when it was the machines fault.

- jbay

There is no way that any user can know enough about the lumber to say that it’s only caused by user error.
Setting up the machine and having flat and square lumber is only part of the equation.

If you get a piece of lumber that’s case hardened, due to not being dried correctly, can be a source of a kickback if there is no riving knife or splitter.
Also, has no one here ever cut a piece of wood off a board and noticed the board is no longer straight?
Internal stresses can be released from a single cut and if it causes the stress to relieve into the blade, no matter how careful the operator is, it’s going to pinch at the back of the blade. So, also making sure you push all the way through is moot. The kickback will have already happened.

Unless the operator selected the log, milled it, dried it and made sure he has seen all steps of the lumber process, there is no way to blame operator error on all kickbacks and assuming there’s some method to avoiding it other than making sure a splitter is there and also making sure you use some kind of tool to help feed the wood through and not your hands.

Kickbacks are the leading cause of fingers being cut off as well. The kickback causes the hand to be pulled into the blade.

View John Smith's profile

John Smith

2044 posts in 696 days


#21 posted 01-21-2018 10:38 PM

why can’t we all just concede that a table saw is a very dangerous tool.
whether one takes chances to operate it in an unsafe manner or not,
the operator is the one that will suffer the consequences.
I, for one, will admit, that a lapse in judgement or a distraction for 1/10th of a Nano Second
can send you to the Emergency Room – regardless of how seasoned or experienced you think you are.
if you choose to work around the safety parameters, you better double check your insurance policy.
so far, my medical bills are approaching the $91,000.00 mark and still climbing.
your shop – your tools = your call.

http://lumberjocks.com/topics/252553

.

-- I am a painter. That's what I do. I paint things --

View patcollins's profile

patcollins

1687 posts in 3398 days


#22 posted 01-21-2018 10:49 PM

Where did you put the feather board? I have seen people put them where they cause the pinching and kickback.

View 000's profile

000

2859 posts in 1432 days


#23 posted 01-21-2018 10:58 PM


There is no way that any user can know enough about the lumber to say that it s only caused by user error.
Setting up the machine and having flat and square lumber is only part of the equation.

If you get a piece of lumber that s case hardened, due to not being dried correctly, can be a source of a kickback if there is no riving knife or splitter.
Also, has no one here ever cut a piece of wood off a board and noticed the board is no longer straight?
Internal stresses can be released from a single cut and if it causes the stress to relieve into the blade, no matter how careful the operator is, it s going to pinch at the back of the blade. So, also making sure you push all the way through is moot. The kickback will have already happened.

Unless the operator selected the log, milled it, dried it and made sure he has seen all steps of the lumber process, there is no way to blame operator error on all kickbacks and assuming there s some method to avoiding it other than making sure a splitter is there and also making sure you use some kind of tool to help feed the wood through and not your hands.

Kickbacks are the leading cause of fingers being cut off as well. The kickback causes the hand to be pulled into the blade.

- AZWoody

Of course there is more to it than just selecting flat wood.
You need to recognize when the wood is starting to pinch if internal stresses are being released, and you need to know what to do at that point. Many a times I have stopped, held my wood down, and had to shut off the saw.

Every situation when making a cut is different.
In reference to your scenarios Being able to recognize what is happening and making the correct decision at that point makes the difference.

I don’t consider myself perfect but I do have experience and I do use my table saw everyday and haven’t had a kickback that I can remember in over 23 years. I’m not naive enough to think that it can’t happen tomorrow but I do take the proper steps when making cuts to insure my odds are better.

View Tony_S's profile

Tony_S

1027 posts in 3616 days


#24 posted 01-21-2018 11:01 PM



If you get a piece of lumber that s case hardened, due to not being dried correctly, can be a source of a kickback if there is no riving knife or splitter.
- AZWoody

That’s user error.

-- It is the mark of an educated mind to be able to entertain a thought without accepting it. Aristotle

View bbasiaga's profile

bbasiaga

1243 posts in 2528 days


#25 posted 01-21-2018 11:29 PM

0.74mm is just less than 0.003”, which is right on the edge of spec for parallelism. Some saw manuals suggest 0.002, others as much as 0.004. Regardless, that is probably not the cause of your problem. As stated above, if you push your piece all the way past the blade then your very very slightly out of line blade will just continue to cut it without much ado.

It could be that your fence is pinched in and is forcing the board in to the blade. Check that as suggested above as well.

I am guessing the featherboard might be the culprit. If it is not fully in front of the blade, it is trouble. It will be pressing the offcut side in to the side of the blade, making it pinch the blade. It will then be thrown at you. Hard, as you have experienced. I don’t often use mine at the table saw, saving it for the bandsaw and router table.

Anyway, check those things out. Don’t expect your splitter to save you. It will help, but not solve any of those alignment issues.

Brian

-- Part of engineering is to know when to put your calculator down and pick up your tools.

View Tony_S's profile

Tony_S

1027 posts in 3616 days


#26 posted 01-21-2018 11:41 PM


0.74mm is just less than 0.003”, which is right on the edge of spec for parallelism.

- bbasiaga

One too many Zero’s Brian. He’s out almost 1/32” in less than 10”. That’s a mile out of spec. That’s probably a good part of the problem right there. Feather board might well be another.

-- It is the mark of an educated mind to be able to entertain a thought without accepting it. Aristotle

View 000's profile

000

2859 posts in 1432 days


#27 posted 01-21-2018 11:42 PM


0.74mm is just less than 0.003”,

Brian

- bbasiaga

0.74mm is .029

View alittleoff's profile

alittleoff

541 posts in 1810 days


#28 posted 01-21-2018 11:48 PM

Get the splitter installed, setup the saw and to really help out put a set of these on the fence also. Best money I ever spent.
Gerald

View el_mustango's profile

el_mustango

31 posts in 746 days


#29 posted 01-21-2018 11:55 PM

Thank you all for your responses.

Thank you especially to @Carloz for your answer that 0.74mm is 15 times worse than acceptable. This is exactly the info I was looking for.

Thanks also to @Dr_T—I will def measure to the fence parallel to the blade front and back. I will be making sure that everything is in perfect alignment with everything else before I ever run another piece of wood through it. The miter gauge fits perfectly in the miter slot, no play whatsoever. That’s why I decided to use the caliper and the miter slot to begin my measurements. Thanks also for the empathy.

@Ripper70 – yes we had to partially disassemble it to transport it. It is likely when it got out of alignment. Thanks for the link to the “Paralleling a Table Saw Fence” video—very helpful.

@Holbs—I will make sure that all three steps are complete and everything is within acceptable parameters. That being said, can someone tell me what those acceptable parameters are? Doing the math based on @Carloz’s statement, is it 0.05mm or less the acceptable tolerance?

I will just conclude by saying that unfortunately, I can’t blame it on the wood. I also accept user error blame, as (a) I had no splitter or riving knife, (b) didn’t make sure that everything was perfectly aligned after I transported it, and (c ) I was obviously not standing in a good spot. After seeing the responses and thinking about it further, it will def be spending some quality time really getting to know the “insides” of this saw and making sure everything is in perfect alignment.

In case anyone else comes upon this thread, here’s a good article on tuning up your table saw: http://www.woodmagazine.com/woodworking-tips/techniques/outfitting-woodworking-shop/tune-up-your-tablesaw

Finally – does anyone knows where I can purchase the actual splitter and guard that came standard on the saw? I contacted GI and they said: ” We’ve been sold-out of these for over a year now. I suggest you look with GRIZZLY or POWERNATIC in the USA, if they have an identical model (same factory).” I’ve looked through both their sites and can’t find it. Perhaps I’m not as bright I claimed above :-)

-- I'm a simple man. I like pretty dark-haired women and breakfast food.

View el_mustango's profile

el_mustango

31 posts in 746 days


#30 posted 01-22-2018 12:00 AM

@alittleoff – i have to admit I don’t know what that is. Could you provide a link to more info?


Get the splitter installed, setup the saw and to really help out put a set of these on the fence also. Best money I ever spent.
Gerald

- alittleoff


-- I'm a simple man. I like pretty dark-haired women and breakfast food.

View Woodknack's profile

Woodknack

12924 posts in 2913 days


#31 posted 01-22-2018 12:21 AM


It s not always user error. Chit happens…
- JackDuren
Earthquakes? But even so, if you are following the guidelines I linked, your exposure to danger will be minimal. Focus on the the everyday things you can control, not the one in a million acts of god you can’t.

-- Rick M, http://thewoodknack.blogspot.com/

View Holbs's profile

Holbs

2249 posts in 2562 days


#32 posted 01-22-2018 12:41 AM

what is acceptable parameter of miter slot to blade? hmm.. as close to 0.000000001” as possible :)
My powermatic 66 is 0.001” over front of blade to rear of Sharkguard splitter. I’m happy with that.
I went with Sharkguard over those MG splitter tabs because wanted a blade guard, dust collection, and splitter in one unit.

-- The Carpenter Bee is derived from the Ancient Greek word wood-cutter "xylokopos/ξυλοκὀπος"

View ppg677's profile

ppg677

219 posts in 1389 days


#33 posted 01-22-2018 12:44 AM



why can t we all just concede that a table saw is a very dangerous tool.
whether one takes chances to operate it in an unsafe manner or not,
the operator is the one that will suffer the consequences.
I, for one, will admit, that a lapse in judgement or a distraction for 1/10th of a Nano Second
can send you to the Emergency Room – regardless of how seasoned or experienced you think you are.
if you choose to work around the safety parameters, you better double check your insurance policy.
so far, my medical bills are approaching the $91,000.00 mark and still climbing.
your shop – your tools = your call.

http://lumberjocks.com/topics/252553

.

- John Smith

How many HP is your saw? I only use 1.5hp saws and I feel they bind up and slow down a bit before the kickback occurs.

View John Smith's profile

John Smith

2044 posts in 696 days


#34 posted 01-22-2018 01:40 AM

PPG – the actual HP is not listed. it was a Skilsaw 3310 15amp with tons of torque.
I sold that man killer a couple of weeks ago and now have rejuvenated an old belt driven Craftsman Pro
with a 1.5 hp motor and am loving it….. all cast iron top and making a few sleds for it.
hopefully, the sleds will minimize any future injuries. you would not believe the safety awareness
that a person has after a terrible accident. I find that I am 3rd guessing myself and triple checking
all safety concerns prior to hitting the green button. [which is a good thang].

be safe boys n girls – be safe

-- I am a painter. That's what I do. I paint things --

View ppg677's profile

ppg677

219 posts in 1389 days


#35 posted 01-22-2018 01:54 AM



PPG – the actual HP is not listed. it was a Skilsaw 3310 15amp with tons of torque.
I sold that man killer a couple of weeks ago and now have rejuvenated an old belt driven Craftsman Pro
with a 1.5 hp motor and am loving it….. all cast iron top and making a few sleds for it.
hopefully, the sleds will minimize any future injuries. you would not believe the safety awareness
that a person has after a terrible accident. I find that I am 3rd guessing myself and triple checking
all safety concerns prior to hitting the green button. [which is a good thang].

be safe boys n girls – be safe

- John Smith

Thanks for the reminder! I bought a SawStop PCS 1.5 after I almost mindlessly put my hand into a spinning blade. But that won’t save me from kickback. I’ve never really experienced kickback. Just a couple very minor ones that didn’t really scare me.

View jonah's profile

jonah

2087 posts in 3832 days


#36 posted 01-22-2018 02:11 AM

Table saw kickback is never caused by the saw. It’s caused by the operator not knowing how to properly set up and use the saw.

Snarkiness aside, you need to align the blade, miter slots, and fence to within a thousandth of an inch or two. If there’s any crookedness, make it so the rear of the fence is farther from the blade, not closer.

And stop standing directly behind the flying wood.

View Carloz's profile

Carloz

1147 posts in 1125 days


#37 posted 01-22-2018 03:33 AM


you need to align the blade, ...and fence to within a thousandth of an inch or two…,

- jonah


Yeah, sure. Good luck with that!

View jonah's profile

jonah

2087 posts in 3832 days


#38 posted 01-22-2018 04:31 AM

It’s dead simple with a dial indicator and a t square fence.

View a1Jim's profile

a1Jim

117738 posts in 4110 days


#39 posted 01-22-2018 03:15 PM

To answer your question look here.

http://thesharkguard.com/products.html

View alittleoff's profile

alittleoff

541 posts in 1810 days


#40 posted 01-22-2018 03:22 PM

Jessem clear cut table saw stock guides link:

http://www.jessemdirect.com/product_p/04301.htm


@alittleoff – i have to admit I don t know what that is. Could you provide a link to more info?

Get the splitter installed, setup the saw and to really help out put a set of these on the fence also. Best money I ever spent.
Gerald

- alittleoff

- el_mustango


View Robert's profile

Robert

3553 posts in 2014 days


#41 posted 01-22-2018 04:02 PM

Set your fence .003 wider at back of cut and use Microjib splitter you will be fine.

Be sure to measure off the same tooth.

Move the fence a couple times and repeat the measurements to be sure something’s not wrong with fence.

-- Everything is a prototype thats why its one of a kind!!

View Markmh1's profile

Markmh1

111 posts in 977 days


#42 posted 01-22-2018 04:24 PM

.74 MM is .029” as was mentioned. My opinion is less than .003 is acceptable. IMO, the saw is unusable as is.

To convert MM to inches, multiply MM X .03937. This will take you anywhere you want to go. (We went to the moon in inches.)

Personally, I would align things with the table slot. You may have to invest in a dial indicator. An indicator that reads in .001 inches works well. These are not that expensive, the last one I bought was Japan made and cost around $30. Even if used infrequently, an indicator is good property.
Aligning the fence and blade with the slot will help with cross cutting too.

I run my blade differently than most others. For hardwoods, my blade projects about an inch above the workpiece. I watched a Forrester saw blade video, and this is what the demo guy recommended. He stated the blade runs cooler this way.
I’m also running a carbide tipped blade, not a Forrester yet. I’ve had enough of steel blades in my life. Steel blades dull quickly, burn, grab the work, and are noisy.

I hope this helps.

Mark

View el_mustango's profile

el_mustango

31 posts in 746 days


#43 posted 01-22-2018 09:41 PM

@john smith—kudos to you for going back to it. Honestly, I’m sure if I’m going to. In my head I know that once I fix the alignment issues I should be fine, but I’m not sure I can ever feel safe and enjoy using it again, I mean, I got off so easy. I huge bruised abrasion on my gut, but otherwise I’m fine. It easily could have pulled my hand into the blade or the piece that kickedbacked could have gotten my in the face and put me in the hospital, like you.

@aliitleoff – thanks! I will def look into those.

I will be making sure that the blade is aligned to within less than .003. Thank you all for your help.

-- I'm a simple man. I like pretty dark-haired women and breakfast food.

View NoSpace's profile

NoSpace

170 posts in 1774 days


#44 posted 01-23-2018 03:18 AM

A general comment: Stories like these make me glad that as a newbie, I bought an (outsourced built and tuned) saw off the shelf of big box store that came with a riving knife, ANTI-KICKBACK, and a blade guard. I used my DeWalt for a year without ever taking any of that stuff off, except for when using a very safe sled. I’d want to have significant experience with saw operation and feel before buying a used one from the 50s and fixing it up.

Specific comment: I’ve never had kickback (on table saw!), or felt I was in a dangerous situation, including the couple of times when it was hard to push the material through when I was learning the saw and realized I’d missed the notch and clamped the fence crooked, and it was pinching the wood at the back of the blade as it went through. Seems like something REALLY has to be wrong to shoot a hunk of wood so hard it leaves a bruise.

When kickback occurs, is there any warning, such as, the saw feels like it’s working to hard for the cut—feel it binding up?

Was there anything in common between the two kickbacks—the same kind of wood / same kind of cut?

what kind of cuts caused the issue, ripping/crosscut? Was the bulk of the piece against the fence, or on the far side of the blade and cutting off a smaller piece against the fence?

View jonah's profile

jonah

2087 posts in 3832 days


#45 posted 01-23-2018 04:53 AM

Not all kickbacks are the same, but many you can tell something is wrong before it happens. Sometimes if you have a really nasty piece of case-hardened or warped wood you can get a comparatively sudden pinch behind the blade.

I’ve stopped cuts plenty of times when something doesn’t feel or sound right. That’s why I always have the power switch near where I can bump it with my leg without letting go of the materials. Pushing right through such feelings is often the cause of kickback or other problems.

These kinds of problems are especially bad with cheaper saws that don’t hold their fence alignment that well (like my old TS3650).

View Carloz's profile

Carloz

1147 posts in 1125 days


#46 posted 01-23-2018 05:47 AM



It s dead simple with a dial indicator and a t square fence.

- jonah


Would not hurt to try before posting here if you actually have a saw (which I doubt now)
There are no fences that are so straight at all hights that would be under 0.003” . You can align it to 0.003” at one point but the spot next to it will be off twice that much so it makes it meaningless.

View lizardhead's profile

lizardhead

653 posts in 3375 days


#47 posted 01-23-2018 09:39 AM

I agree with jay. You need to be able to cut with confidence and to get that confidence you need experience and to get that experience you need to cut more wood. Not mentioned directly is the fact that the table needs to be aligned with the blade. Think like a saw, be like a saw, be one with the saw. I have given classes on woodworking and I can tell in a heartbeat whether or not a student has the skills needed for operating a table saw. If I have even an inkling of doubt, I will not allow them to proceed. No siree not on my watch. I have seen folks that know their way around the shop pretty well but a table saw scares them. And if it scares them, it frightens the hell out of me.

-- Good, Better, Best--Never let it rest---Always make your Good be Better & your Better Best

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lizardhead

653 posts in 3375 days


#48 posted 01-23-2018 09:45 AM

One more thing on the matter. I believe that repetitive cutting is a time when you must be most consistent with your attention, not the least. Repetitiveness yields a perfect time to haphazardly get a hand in the path of a blade.

-- Good, Better, Best--Never let it rest---Always make your Good be Better & your Better Best

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HorizontalMike

7801 posts in 3447 days


#49 posted 01-23-2018 11:04 AM



@alittleoff – i have to admit I don t know what that is. Could you provide a link to more info?

Get the splitter installed, setup the saw and to really help out put a set of these on the fence also. Best money I ever spent.
Gerald

- alittleoff
- el_mustango

They work very similarly to yellow board buddies in holding boards down and as feather-boards:

http://www.grizzly.com/products/Board-Buddies-For-Table-Saws-Yellow/W1104

-- HorizontalMike -- "Woodpeckers understand..."

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Ryndom

9 posts in 3808 days


#50 posted 01-23-2018 11:05 AM

You should be able to re-align the blade. Done it before on many different types of saw.

now I’ll echo a lot of the advice given already

Your kick-backs are not related to that alignment:
1) Set up fence so that it is either parallel with blade – or opens up a fraction
2) Stand so-that you can control the wood all the way through the cut – you don’t let go until wood is completely clear of blade
3) Use the right blade. Use a ripping blade for ripping – you should go with fewer teeth and maybe a thin blade, if your saw is under powered, I’m not a huge fan of the thin kerf blades, but might be worth a try.
4) Use a push stick that you can safely cut with the blade – and is big enough to keep your hands away from blade
5) Don’t use a push stick if you don’t have to, by that I mean if there is enough room for your hand to pass safely between fence and blade – you are better off without the push stick
6) If you are using a push stick, don’t use it until the end of the wood is all the way on the table – otherwise you end up pushing down on the end – and the other end goes up, and rides on top of the blade – and causes kick-back
7) Invite an experienced woodworker to hang out while you cut some wood – and ask his/her advice on your technique
8) Go to local lumber yard – buy a cheep sheet of 4×8 foam, put in a crappy blade, and rip until you know you can control the wood. If you cut up the sheet – and still feeling uncomfortable – go buy another sheet.

**

-- Rand Richards, [email protected]

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