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All Replies on scoring cuts in veneered material, like melamine

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View toolie's profile

scoring cuts in veneered material, like melamine

by toolie
posted 01-14-2018 03:01 PM


8 replies so far

View Jim Finn's profile

Jim Finn

2753 posts in 3462 days


#1 posted 01-14-2018 03:45 PM

Have you tried applying tape, before cutting, top and bottom, on the cut line?

-- No PHD just a DD214

View Ripper70's profile

Ripper70

1343 posts in 1448 days


#2 posted 01-14-2018 03:51 PM

If you’re thinking of trying this with a full sheet of 3/4” material and only making a 1/16” or 1/32” scoring cut, the weight of the wood will probably heavy enough to offer adequate control of the cut. I think it could work. Having a second set of hands on the operator’s side of the table might be safer since you probably will need some outfeed support.

-- "You know, I'm such a great driver, it's incomprehensible that they took my license away." --Vince Ricardo

View waho6o9's profile

waho6o9

8786 posts in 3117 days


#3 posted 01-14-2018 06:17 PM

How about using a blade designed for melamine?

View Loren's profile

Loren

10477 posts in 4188 days


#4 posted 01-14-2018 06:26 PM

There was some discussion recently on the
Festool Owners Group of this topic. Various
methods were mentioned to reduce chipout
but there was a general agreement that
melamine got from commercial suppliers was
far less prone to it compared with big box
suppliers.

View BurlyBob's profile

BurlyBob

6640 posts in 2805 days


#5 posted 01-14-2018 06:31 PM

I’ve found that a very shallow cut on either side will reduce chipping to virtually nothing. Also when I make the final cut I never let the saw teeth extend past the surface of the material. I’m using a WW 2 thin kerf.

View AlaskaGuy's profile

AlaskaGuy

5414 posts in 2849 days


#6 posted 01-14-2018 06:54 PM



There was some discussion recently on the
Festool Owners Group of this topic. Various
methods were mentioned to reduce chipout
but there was a general agreement that
melamine got from commercial suppliers was
far less prone to it compared with big box
suppliers.

- Loren


+1 not all melamine is created equal.

-- Alaskan's for Global warming!

View toolie's profile

toolie

2172 posts in 3168 days


#7 posted 01-19-2018 03:09 PM



How about using a blade designed for melamine?

- waho6o9

I cant believe I overlooked something so obvious. I might even have that blade already! Thanks!

-- there's a solution to every problem.......you just have to be willing to find it.

View 000's profile

000

2859 posts in 1439 days


#8 posted 01-19-2018 09:19 PM

Typically, Melamine blades have a -5 degree (negative) hook.
They also need to be sharp or your losing the battle.

It’s all about the angle the teeth hit the surface.
I have cut miles of melamine and if the blade is to low it will chip out the top, too high and more chipping on the bottom. You need to find the happy medium.

When all else fails raise the blade about 1/16” and score the bottom first and raise the blade to about 3/4” above the surface to make the final cut. Your mileage may very, because as they have said above, different melamines have different qualities.

(Please don’t run your material backwards through the saw.)

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