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Is this lathe worth grabbing just for fun?

by Andybb
posted 01-12-2018 10:14 PM


37 replies so far

View MrUnix's profile (online now)

MrUnix

7502 posts in 2736 days


#1 posted 01-12-2018 10:39 PM

For $25, why not? Slap a teadmill motor on it and you have a nice little variable speed lathe for cheap. Don’t need a chuck, just some turning tools.

Cheers,
Brad

-- Brad in FL - In Dog I trust... everything else is questionable

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Andybb

2150 posts in 1141 days


#2 posted 01-12-2018 11:08 PM

Done. Thanks Brad.

As I said, I don’t know nuttin’ bout turnin’. Why don’t I need a chuck? And do I need a treadmill motor or will a regular motor with a VSC work? HP? Guess it’s time for Turning 101 for me.

-- Andy - Seattle USA

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socrbent

897 posts in 2807 days


#3 posted 01-12-2018 11:24 PM

Congrats on your purchase. Lots of turning can be done with out a chuck by turning between centers. A regular motor can be used even without a VSC. That is why there are different sized pulleys on the headstock. A VSC would simply made it simpler. Motor size depends on what you choose to turn. Look for a face plate as an inexpense way to expand what you can turn. There are tons of videos available to help you learn.

Your lathe looks just like one my dad taught me on about 60 years ago. Made a walnut lamp as a 4H project.

-- socrbent Ohio

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Loren

10477 posts in 4185 days


#4 posted 01-12-2018 11:27 PM

Those step pulleys were usually pared with
a motor with another step pulley on it. Any
washing machine type fractional horsepower
motor will do. They are all over the place, used
and cheap.

That’s a bargain. I’m looking for a secondhand
basic lathe right now and most of them are
asking way more money.

View Lazyman's profile

Lazyman

4085 posts in 1925 days


#5 posted 01-12-2018 11:28 PM

Here is a good recent forum topic with some info and links that will help you get started.

Any motor of about 1/2 HP and up will probably do. Treadmill motors are variable speed (which is nice) and you can get them free or cheap if you keep your eyes open for them, though you may have to haul away and disassemble someone’s old treadmill to get one.

Chucks are a nice to have for convenience but you can do 99% of what they do using face plates and other tried and true techniques that you’ll learn as you read about the various turning techniques.

-- Nathan, TX -- Hire the lazy man. He may not do as much work but that's because he will find a better way.

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Andybb

2150 posts in 1141 days


#6 posted 01-12-2018 11:35 PM

Cool. Motors I have. HF here I come. I’ll destroy these first.

Thanks Loren.
Lazyman—-thanks. You’re right. Great thread.

Looks like it’s a Montgomery Ward Powr-kraft made by Duro Metal Products. Damn! Another learning curve and hours of youtube to watch! (I love it) Looks like I’m all in for less than $75 even after making it purdy. Can’t be much to it other than some bearings if needed. Plenty of references on the vintage tool sites.

-- Andy - Seattle USA

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Andybb

2150 posts in 1141 days


#7 posted 01-12-2018 11:46 PM

.

-- Andy - Seattle USA

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MrUnix

7502 posts in 2736 days


#8 posted 01-13-2018 12:27 AM

I believe that lathe will only have one bearing (thrust bearing in headstock), and the spindle will be riding in bushings – notice the oil holes in the top of the spindle housing. Just use some good 20W non-detergent oil or similar (I use AW32 hydraulic oil). It would probably be a good idea to tear it apart so you can clean and inspect things first, but at the very least, make sure those bushings are well lubricated before running.

You don’t have to get a treadmill motor, it was just a suggestion and you can get them for free. A regular induction motor (1750 rpm) will work, but you will need to find a matching stepped pulley for it.

There are plenty of ways to do stuff without throwing money at it (See here: Woodturning on the cheap). Figure out what size/thread the spindle is and get yourself a thread tap for it (if you don’t already have one). Then you can make all the faceplates, threaded glueblocks, mandrels, jam chucks and other stuff you want for the price of scrap wood found in a construction site dumpster :)

Cheers,
Brad

-- Brad in FL - In Dog I trust... everything else is questionable

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Andybb

2150 posts in 1141 days


#9 posted 01-13-2018 12:50 AM

Thanks. Yeah I figured I’d tear it down and refurb it first. That’s half the fun for me.
Looks like this one from 1940.

Your thread looks to be just up my alley Brad. Thanks again.

Don’t know if I’ll become a “turner” but it’s nice to have the option of turning a leg or something if the need arises or looking at something and saying, “I can do that”.

-- Andy - Seattle USA

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Woodknack

12927 posts in 2917 days


#10 posted 01-13-2018 08:07 AM

Looks like you lucked out, the spindle looks to be 3/4-16, same as old Craftsman lathes which means accessories and centers will be common and inexpensive. The bigger Duro used an uncommon spindle size which would have been annoying. I’m assuming it’s this one:

http://vintagemachinery.org/pubs/detail.aspx?id=846

-- Rick M, http://thewoodknack.blogspot.com/

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Andybb

2150 posts in 1141 days


#11 posted 01-13-2018 05:07 PM

Excellent, and thanks for the link. Very nostalgic.

The listing said it is missing its arbor. Not quite sure what that means yet as the lingo is all new to me. I’ll be picking it up in a few days and can inspect it then. Stand by for more pics and questions.

-- Andy - Seattle USA

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Andybb

2150 posts in 1141 days


#12 posted 01-13-2018 09:27 PM

Again, thanks to all.

Actually found a youtube series No Chuck, No Problem so I’ve got plenty to do without spending another dime.

-- Andy - Seattle USA

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MrUnix

7502 posts in 2736 days


#13 posted 01-13-2018 09:46 PM

Actually found a youtube series No Chuck, No Problem so I ve got plenty to do without spending another dime.
- Andybb

You got to remember that the lathe is an ancient tool that has been around for thousands of years… and the vast majority of that time, they didn’t have chucks (or live centers, or pre-made turning tools, or fancy sharpening systems, etc….). Yet, they were able to do some pretty amazing stuff anyway.

The video you linked to is one way to go about it using a faceplate. I’m not real fond of faceplates though. If you mount it directly to your workpiece, then you are left with holes in it when done (although not always), and if you are turning it thin, you have to worry about hitting the screws. Mounting a faceplate on a glueblock and then gluing it onto the workpiece never made sense to me either, when all you need to do is thread the glueblock and forget about the faceplate and screws entirely. I guess some people just like doing extra work :)

Here is one such example making a lidded box (actually two) using a threaded glueblock: No-chuck lidded box – as a follow on to my woodturning on the cheap thread :-O

Cheers,
Brad

-- Brad in FL - In Dog I trust... everything else is questionable

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Woodknack

12927 posts in 2917 days


#14 posted 01-13-2018 10:01 PM



Excellent, and thanks for the link. Very nostalgic.

The listing said it is missing its arbor. Not quite sure what that means yet as the lingo is all new to me. I ll be picking it up in a few days and can inspect it then. Stand by for more pics and questions.

- Andybb

Probably a work arbor, not a big loss.

-- Rick M, http://thewoodknack.blogspot.com/

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Andybb

2150 posts in 1141 days


#15 posted 01-13-2018 11:50 PM


Cheers,
Brad

Ah. It’s all becoming clearer. Seems like turning doesn’t require a lot of torque so threaded pieces of hardwood on the headstock are just as good as a face plate. Even easier than embedding a nut in the block as I’ve seen others do.

-- Andy - Seattle USA

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woodbutcherbynight

5974 posts in 2946 days


#16 posted 01-14-2018 12:15 AM

Having a lathe handy and knowing how to use it opens many doors for other projects or repairs. I have two and find them a excellent resource.

-- Live to tell the stories, they sound better that way.

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Clarkswoodworking

289 posts in 671 days


#17 posted 01-14-2018 10:17 PM

If you need any turning material or a slab or 2 let me know I am local and have access to low cost maple
Figured and quilted
Here is a sample

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Andybb

2150 posts in 1141 days


#18 posted 01-15-2018 06:57 AM

I got it home and here are some parts. Looks like it will clean/paint up nicely.

Even with the rust that’s on it the tailstock turns very smoothly.

This came out with the tailstock. Looks like what’s left of something very greasy. Probably the arbor they said was missing that Rick referred to. Tried tapping it out but didn’t want to force it. Sprayed it with WD40 and set it aside.

Here is the headstock. It doesn’t exactly freewheel on its own when you spin it but seems like it will be fine after a good refurb. Unless I miss my guess the metal tab would allow you to engage the pulley when you don’t want it to spin.

And these came with it.

-- Andy - Seattle USA

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Andybb

2150 posts in 1141 days


#19 posted 01-15-2018 05:06 PM

So, correct me if I’m wrong but I’m thinking that the piece in the tailstock is an arbor that had (if I’ve got the lingo right) a live center of some kind on the end of it and should be removable? And what is the preferred method for removing the piece from the headstock? Is #2 just on the end of another tapered arbor or does the shaft get immobilized and #1 should turn? Can’t really tell and can’t find a parts diagram. Seems like there has to be a way to remove the shaft to change the belt. May seem like silly questions but I am a total lathe noob and don’t want to break anything.

-- Andy - Seattle USA

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Woodknack

12927 posts in 2917 days


#20 posted 01-15-2018 06:28 PM

1 should be part of the spindle and not removable by itself.
2 is the drive center and should be a machine taper, friction fit. There should be a hole through the spindle through which you insert a steel rod and drive out the center. If not a through hole then maybe with a drift key.

-- Rick M, http://thewoodknack.blogspot.com/

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Andybb

2150 posts in 1141 days


#21 posted 01-15-2018 06:46 PM


1 should be part of the spindle and not removable by itself.
2 is the drive center and should be a machine taper, friction fit. There should be a hole through the spindle through which you insert a steel rod and drive out the center. If not a through hole then maybe with a drift key.

- Rick_M


Thanks Rick. I’m at work now but it didn’t seem like the spindle was hollow. Am I correct in assuming that the piece in the tailstock is a broken live center with a machine taper and should also come out the same way? And how do I change the belt?

-- Andy - Seattle USA

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Woodknack

12927 posts in 2917 days


#22 posted 01-15-2018 07:50 PM

Tailstock centers are also usually tapers and on older lathes can be self ejecting, driven out with a rod, or driven out with a drift key. I’ve had all of them. Tapered centers can be difficult to remove even you soak them in WD 40. Once I had to take a tailstock to a garage and have a center pressed out with a hydraulic press. Guy said it was the highest pressure they had ever used. But it cam out without damage.

Belts are usually changed by removing the spindle. Usually there will be one or more left hand nuts on the out board side and one or more grub screws on the pulleys. The spindle might need a little persuasion from a mallet to come loose the first time.

-- Rick M, http://thewoodknack.blogspot.com/

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Woodknack

12927 posts in 2917 days


#23 posted 01-15-2018 08:02 PM

Something else I just remembered, it’s possible there are shims, they will look like flimsy washers, just keep track of where they come from and put them back. You probably won’t have any but just in case.

-- Rick M, http://thewoodknack.blogspot.com/

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Andybb

2150 posts in 1141 days


#24 posted 01-15-2018 08:26 PM

Excellent. Thanks. Looks like there is a hole in the shaft behind the “pointy center arbor thingy” that a drift key would fit in.

-- Andy - Seattle USA

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Woodknack

12927 posts in 2917 days


#25 posted 01-15-2018 08:28 PM

I don’t have a drift and use a screwdriver, lol. That may not work if it’s frozen with rust though.

-- Rick M, http://thewoodknack.blogspot.com/

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Andybb

2150 posts in 1141 days


#26 posted 01-15-2018 08:32 PM

I don’t have a drift either. Was planning on using a nail set or some other persuader. That may be my biggest challenge. I manage an auto dealership so no shortage of presses etc in my service dept. to get the tailstock apart.

-- Andy - Seattle USA

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Woodknack

12927 posts in 2917 days


#27 posted 01-15-2018 09:44 PM

Oh, and it’s probably obvious to you but it wasn’t to me, the headstock spindle comes out toward the tailstock, toward the inboard side. So once you get the nuts off and set screws loose, tap on the outboard side. Might as well replace the bearings while you’re in there.
http://thewoodknack.blogspot.com/p/bearing-guide.html

-- Rick M, http://thewoodknack.blogspot.com/

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Andybb

2150 posts in 1141 days


#28 posted 01-15-2018 11:47 PM

The suspense was killing me so I ran home and looked at the headstock spindle. It is hollow, but the arbor easily popped right out using the nail set. Depending on how much of a fight the spindle gives me I may just leave well enough alone but I’ll give it a go. We all know how that could go south in a hurry on a 70 year old tool. My shop foreman is gonna introduce Mr. Tailstock to Mr. Hydraulic press.

-- Andy - Seattle USA

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Nubsnstubs

1625 posts in 2267 days


#29 posted 01-16-2018 01:06 AM

In post 18, the last picture shows what are live center interchangeable centers. The 2 flat faced and the cup ring parts are what came with my live center I purchased back in 84-85. The threaded thing I don’t know about.
The first picture in that post looks like the live center shell with an arbor attached and in the quill.
The second picture looks like the live center shell. If it hasn’t been separated from the quill, toss it as you are missing the nose of the live center. Get a new one that will fit your lathe. Do not toss the interchangeable nose parts. Some people here could have a need for them.
The third picture looks like you are showing the inside of the quill. If so, is that the rest of the live center? If it is, knock it out, reassemble the quill into the tailstock, and you are closer to turning than you know…... .......... Jerry (in Tucson)

-- Jerry (in Tucson) www.woodturnerstools.com

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Andybb

2150 posts in 1141 days


#30 posted 01-16-2018 11:28 PM

Thanks again everybody. Amazed at how easily this thing came apart. Only one or two pumps on the press and the arbor popped right out. Probably would have without the press if I had secured it a little better at home. The serial number starts wit 34 which means it is from 1943.

Now for some chemical and wire brush cleaning and paint (unless I get lazy and it looks good af after some simple green and a good pressure washing). Will probably just repack the bearing that’s there for now since it’s an easy switch and I have no idea how often I’ll use this thing.

From what I can tell this should fit in the tailstock. Yes I know it’s from HF but I’m still under $75 spent on this thing after the cheap-ass HF turning tools. I could be turning by the end of the day if there are no surprises.

-- Andy - Seattle USA

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MrUnix

7502 posts in 2736 days


#31 posted 01-16-2018 11:35 PM

If it’s the lathe Rick pointed to, it has an MT1 taper not an MT2… so that one from HF won’t work. Verify the model you have first, as there were a couple that looked almost identical but had different swings. 14” one had MT2, smaller ones had MT1 according to the 1943 catalog.

Cheers,
Brad

-- Brad in FL - In Dog I trust... everything else is questionable

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Woodknack

12927 posts in 2917 days


#32 posted 01-17-2018 12:31 AM

It was Andy that identified the lathe but the spindle looks right.

-- Rick M, http://thewoodknack.blogspot.com/

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Andybb

2150 posts in 1141 days


#33 posted 01-17-2018 01:11 AM

You guys are awesome. I was just about to head to HF when I saw this. The arbor measures .485 at the fat end and .398 at the narrow end. Looks like Model #34FD889B. Guess I’m gonna have to paint it. :-)

Edit… It’s 12mm so I guess it’s an MT1 and it’s after 5pm here so I might be SOL for today, but I do have the “dead center” tip. I’ll take it with me just to be sure and at least grab the tools and consult Amazon Prime for the live center.

Amazon lists live centers for for mini-lathes as MT1 but the HF mini lathe says it’s an MT2. Still might get in under my $75 goal.

Amazon live centers

-- Andy - Seattle USA

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Nubsnstubs

1625 posts in 2267 days


#34 posted 01-17-2018 02:30 AM

If those interchangeable centers for your existing live center has not tapered but straight arbors, all you need to do is take the shell and a center to a bearing house. They should be able to match up a SEALED bearing to fit and you will be in business tomorrow. ........... Jerry (in Tucson)

-- Jerry (in Tucson) www.woodturnerstools.com

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MrUnix

7502 posts in 2736 days


#35 posted 01-17-2018 02:45 AM

I was just about to head to HF when I saw this.
- Andybb

Dimensions of Standard Tapers

You have an MT1 – measure it in inches not metric. Good thing you didn’t go to HF… not only would it not fit, but if it’s like our local HF (and the next one south of us), they don’t stock those centers – they are mail order only according to the manager of my local store.

If you can get the dead center to fit in the tailstock, then you are in business. You don’t have to have a live center to turn between centers, and that lathe originally shipped with a dead center only.

Cheers,
Brad

-- Brad in FL - In Dog I trust... everything else is questionable

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Andybb

2150 posts in 1141 days


#36 posted 01-17-2018 03:19 AM


they don t stock those centers – they are mail order only according to the manager of my local store.
Cheers,
Brad
- MrUnix

Too late, but you are right. Mail order only. The wife sent me out for prescription dog food so I stopped at HF. Then I forgot to get the turning tools. Just as well as idle hands will now have time to paint and make it purdy, mount a motor and fashion a glue block from some hard wood then grab a bearing from Grainger in the morning. The dead center does fit in the tailstock.

Delivery tomorrow

Cleaning up nicely. No surprises.

Still under $75.

As always, thanks.

-- Andy - Seattle USA

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Andybb

2150 posts in 1141 days


#37 posted 01-18-2018 04:02 AM

Well, it spins! There was an open box set of the $79.99 HSS HF turning tools with a nick in one of the handles that I got for $54 after the coupon so I grabbed ‘em and used one of the rough gouges as a test. Definitely needs a VSC or a treadmill motor. Changing pulleys is a PITA. Also can see the benefit of a live center for the tailstock. Putting enough pressure on it to keep the headstock engaged pushed the tailstock needle all the way in and heated up the end of the wood. But, like I said, it spins and square wood was made round. This was just a piece of 2×4. Will practice on a few more of those then switch to some scrap hardwood.

-- Andy - Seattle USA

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